Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 857 items for :

  • Just Published x
  • Nach Ebene eingrenzen: All x
Clear All
Editor-in-Chief:
Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now also published online is published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law. It is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to the acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the development of international law is viewed as being integral to Africa’s own development.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.

The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-african agencies.

Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of the African Yearbook of International Law.
Series Editor:
Informed by an anti-colonial spirit of resistance to injustices, this book series examines the ways and the degree to which the legacy of colonialism continues to influence the content of school curriculum, shape teachers’ teaching practices, and impact the outcome of the academic success of students, including students of color. Further, books published in this series illuminate the manner in which the legacy of colonialism remains one of the root causes of educational and socio-economic inequalities. This series also analyzes the ways and the extent to which such legacy has been responsible for many forms of classism that are race- and language-based. By so doing, this series illuminates the manner in which race intersects with class and language affecting the psychological, educational, cultural, and socio-economic conditions of historically and racially disenfranchised communities. All in all, this series highlights the ways and the degree to which the legacy of colonialism along with race-language-class- and gender-based discrimination continue to affect the existence of people, particularly people of color.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to the Aquisitions Editor, John Bennett.
The electronic version of the series Approaches to Translation Studies..

Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Series Editors: , , and
Arts, Creativities, and Learning Environments in Global Perspectives aims at investigating the encounters that can occur between the arts and creativities in various learning environments and cultural contexts. The series intends to explore the multiplicity of these approaches by presenting perspectives from diverse learning environments, not solely formal institutions like schools, universities, academies, and colleges, but also non-formal ones (cultural institutions, libraries, museums, theatres, orchestras, archives, organisations, and work-places) or informal ones (play and games, community projects, amateur art, and clubs). This means that a pluralistic view on the artS – indeed, plural – is being embraced by including artistic expressions from all genres and artistic encounters at all levels, including the arts-based, artist-led, arts-inspired, arts-integrated. We encourage contributions from all over the world, in order to challenge a well-established Western-centred understanding of creativity and art (singular). This series will strongly support global perspectives, cross-cultural studies, critical theories, creative dissemination and a broader re-framing of the role of the arts for learning and for society.