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Editor-in-Chief:
AVISTA Studies in the History of Medieval Technology, Science and Art is a wide-ranging and multi-disciplinary book series publishing scholarly work on a variety of aspects of technology, science, art, and architecture of the Middle Ages. The series publishes works that emphasize the interrelationship of these fields. In doing so, the series aims to promote a cross-disciplinary perspective, and submissions are encouraged from any field of study, including (but not limited to) history, art and architectural history, manuscript studies, literature, and history of science. Studies with a closer focus or works examining wider contexts and global developments are equally welcomed. The series publishes monographs, thematic edited volumes, and, on occasion, text editions and translations. All proposals from early career projects to those from established scholars are invited.

The series is published in affiliation with the Association Villard de Honnecourt for Interdisciplinary Study of Medieval Technology, Science and Art (AVISTA), an international society dedicated to the cross-disciplinary exploration of the linked fields of technology, science and art in the Middle Ages.

This series was published by Routledge until August 2020. For volumes published before August 2020, please contact Routledge.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Beihefte zum Daphnis
Editor:
Die Beihefte-Reihe zum Daphnis bringt Beiträge zu Rahmenthemen unter der Verantwortung dazu eingeladener Herausgeber.

From its foundation in 1972, Chloe as series related to the journal Daphnis was conceived as a platform for the publication of research into German literature and culture of the early modern period (14th-18th century). Since then it has developed to take on board interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives. It is considered today an outstanding international scholarly forum for research into the early modern period. From a comparative point of view it examines the relationship between German literatures and cultural history and the culture of other European (and non-European) countries in the period, as well as such phenomena as cultural transfer. It addresses problems pertaining to the early new high German language and to Neo-Latin literature, as well as to new research fields such as intermediality, performance theories or gender studies.
With its double blind peer-review procedures, Chloe is a platform which welcomes previously unpublished contributions in German or English.

Die Reihe Chloe ist seit 1972 als Organ zur Erforschung der deutschen Literatur(en) und Kultur(en) der Frühen Neuzeit (14.-18.Jh) konzipiert worden. Seit ihrer Gründung hat sie sich im Sinne einer breiteren Interdisziplinarität und interkulturellen Perspektive entwickelt und ausdifferenziert. Heute gilt sie als ein international anerkanntes wissenschaftliches Forum für Frühneuzeitforschung. Sie berücksichtigt unter komparatistischem Aspekt die Beziehungen der deutschen Literatur und Kultur zu den europäischen (auch außereuropäischen) Kulturen dieses Zeitraums und Phänomene des Kulturtransfers. Hinzu kommen aktuelle Fragestellungen der frühneuhochdeutschen Sprache, der neulateinischen Literatur wie auch neuere Forschungsfelder der Intermedialität, Performanz, Gender Studies u.a. Im Rahmen der jährlich vorgesehenen vier Hefte sind inhaltlich geschlossene Themenhefte möglich und werden von Gastherausgebern verantwortet. Im Chloe werden noch unveröffentlichte Beiträge in deutscher und englischer Sprache.


Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Natural law changed its character in the post-Reformation period, mainly because it became an academic discipline. This institutionalisation happened first in Protestant countries but increasingly also in Catholic areas. In the hands of philosophers and jurists rather than theologians the subject served a wide variety of purposes in domestic, colonial, imperial and international politics, in judicial administration, legislation and reform, in social analysis and in the inculcation of social ethics. Although concerned with the foundations of morality, law and politics, early modern natural law was far from a coherent philosophical theory, but rather the framework for fundamental disputes. What kind of natural law was adopted in a given place and period was often a matter of local controversy in state, church and university. At the same time, natural law was characterised by extensive transnational networks.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editors or the Publisher at Brill, Alessandra Giliberto.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Editors: and
This series provides a forum for high-quality scholarly work - original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources, translations - on the cultures, economies and societies of a vast area of Eastern Europe, from the fall of the Hunnic empire of Attila to the fall of Constantinople. It advances the revision of earlier historiography, either on the entire area or certain regions.

A wide range of disciplines are included: all historical subjects, every branch of archaeology, language, art history and architecture, sculpture and numismatics, with focuses on regional variations and cultural identities, the interaction between internal and external factors, and the diversity of the local responses to external stimuli. The series is also interested in how the medieval past has been viewed, used, and (re)constructed in east-central and eastern Europe up until the twentieth century.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editors, Professor Florin Curta and Professor Dušan Zupka, or the Publisher at Brill Dr Kate Hammond .

All books published in the series undergo double-blind peer review.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Established 50 years ago by the late Georges Vajda, the series Études sur le judaïsme médiéval, while specialising in Rabbanite and Qaraite texts in Hebrew, Judaeo-Arabic and Judaeo-Persian, publishes scholarly monographs, collective volumes, conference proceedings, as well as editions and translation in all areas of Medieval Jewish literature, philosophy, science, exegesis, ethics, polemics, mysticism and Genizah studies, focusing on the philological and philosophical approach. The series also publishes two separate subseries, Cambridge Genizah and Karaite Texts and Studies.

The series published an average of 3,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
This is a peer-reviewed book series that seeks to understand the process of European expansion, interchange and connectivity in a global context in the early modern and modern period. It will seek to understand this transformative process and period in cultural, economic, social, and ideological terms in Africa, the Indian Ocean, Central and East Asia and the Pacific Rim. This series will provide a forum for varied scholarly work - original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources translations - on these exciting global mixtures and their impact on culture, politics and society in the period from the Portuguese navigators of the late fifteenth century until the end of ‘Company’ rule in British India in the mid-nineteenth century. It will move beyond the traditional isolated and nation bound historiographical emphases of this field which have isolated continents and nation-states and toward a broader intellectual terrain, encouraging whenever possible non-European perspectives. It will also encourage a wider disciplinary approach to early modern studies. Themes in this series will include the exchange of ideas and products, especially through the medium of trading companies; the exchange of religions and traditions; the transfer of technologies; the development of new forms of political, social and economic policy, as well as identity formation. It will seek out studies that employ diverse forms of analysis from all scholarly disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, history, (including the history of science), linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, and religious studies. In addition, it will include works translated from French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor George Bryan Souza or the Publisher at Brill Alessandra Giliberto.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
The European Association for American Studies Series
Series Editor:
European Perspectives on the United States: The European Association for American Studies Series is published under the auspices and with the editorial involvement of the European Association for American Studies. This peer-reviewed series provides a broad reflection of the state of American Studies in Europe. While the series prioritizes academic works that accentuate the importance of transnationality and interdisciplinarity in the study of the United States, it aims to properly recognize the diverse and relevant European achievements in the main disciplines of American Studies, to include but not limited to literary studies, cultural studies, film and media studies, history, and the social sciences. Benefiting from the varied professional alignments of European Americanists, European Perspectives on the United States will initiate new directions of dialogue in American Studies by opening the field to voices from across nations and continents.

European Perspectives on the United States has value for a wide and diverse range of academics and postdoctoral and postgraduate research students representing an array of disciplines within the humanities and social sciences. The series is intended to serve as an inclusive resource for researchers and readers with a multi-/interdisciplinary focus in American Studies. Given the central importance of American Studies in relation to key questions of global import relating to climate, migration, borders, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, terrorism, and many other topics, the series serves as a much-needed forum to foster dialogue and cooperation within and between spheres of inquiry and activity.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
Author:
This study of the pioneer mission to the Zulu people differs from others in South African mission studies by offering a more nuanced understanding of the relationship between mission and church during the formatives stages in the making of an African Christian community, both in America and in British Natal. Critical scholars continue to view the Western mission enterprise as an adjunct if not a tool of colonialism or at best a clash of cultures between white mission powerbrokers and powerless black Christian acolytes. The author argues that they were partners from the beginning, and in this endeavor the Christian identities of the missionaries as well as the Zulu were changed forever.