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Volume Editors: Ruth Frehner and Ursula Zeller
This is the first-time publication of long-lost letters by a crucial figure in modernist publishing. Carefully edited and extensively contextualised, they document Beach’s unwavering, all-embracing support for Joyce’s art by publishing his controversial Ulysses in Paris in 1922 and other efforts such as getting fragments of Work in Progress published. They also reveal her difficulties with his uncompromising and demanding personality, as it is vividly illustrated in the Frankfurter Zeitung affair. The edition moreover includes all extant letters to Paul Léon, her successor after their break-up following severe disagreements over the American edition of Ulysses. Joyceans and scholars of modernism will find this an indispensable resource for further research.
The articles in The Bounds of Myth, edited by Gustavo Esparza and Nassim Bravo, shed light on the internal shapes of the mythological discourse, showing the way in which myth borders religion, science, literature, theology, i.e., other forms of rationality. The contributing authors of the volume claim that myth is a valid form of thought and that the former evolves within other forms of discourse, even though its composition is independent and even precedes the latter.
The articles collected here demonstrate the importance of myth as a form of thought that is in constant development, a feature that shows in turn that in spite of its remote and archaic origin, myth remains a valuable and relevant tool to interpret our own culture.

Contributors are: Nassim Bravo, Claudio Calabrese, Teresa Enríquez, Gustavo Esparza, Ethel Junco, Enrique Martínez, Cecilia Sabido and Jon Stewart.
Experimental forms in Argentina, 1955-1968
Author: Elize Mazadiego
Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art reconceptualizes mid-twentieth-century avant-garde practices in Argentina with a focus on the changing material status of the art object in relation to the country’s intense period of modernization. Elize Mazadiego presents Oscar Masotta’s notion of dematerialization as a concept for interpreting experimental art practices that negated the object’s primacy, while identifying their promise within the sociopolitical transformations of the 1950s and 1960s. She argues that, in abandoning the traditional art object, the avant-garde developed new materialities rooted in Buenos Aires’ changing social life. A critical examination of art’s materiality and its social role within Argentina, this important study paves the way for broader investigations of postwar Latin American art.
Author: Gino Zaccaria
In his book The Enigma of Art. On the provenance of Artistic Creation Gino Zaccaria offers a philosophical meditation on the issue of art in light of its original sense. The book shows how this sense can be fully understood provided that our thinking, on the one hand, returns to the ancient Greek world where it must heed, in particular, the voice and hints of the goddess Athena, and, on the other hand, listens to “artist-thinkers” close to our current epoch, like Cézanne, Boccioni or van Gogh. What will finally appear will not be an abstract notion of art, but its enigma; that is to say, the promise of a conversion of art itself towards its "other beginning".
Insights into Latinx Identity in the Twenty-First Century
In Latinidad at the Crossroad: Insights into Latinx identity in the Twenty-First Century Gerke and González Rodríguez provide flashing glimpses into the ways in which Latinas/os struggle to forge their multiracial and multicultural identities within their own communities and in mainstream U.S. society. This volume encompasses an interdisciplinary perspective on the complex range of latinidades that confronts stereotypical connotations, and simultaneously advocates a more flexible (re)definition that may overcome static collective representations of identity, ethnicity and belonging. Well-positioned in the current political context, the notion of latinidad is examined as a complex sociological phenomenon of identity-construction which is affected by outside influences and is used as a powerful linguistic, cultural and ideological weapon to denounce oppression and deconstruct stereotypes. Including chapters from foundational and influential scholars, this collection moves towards a dynamic exploration of how Latinx are remapping their identity positions in twenty-first century America.

Contributors: Francisco A. Lomelí, José Antonio Gurpegui, Esther Álvarez López, Ylce Irizarry, Luisa María González Rodríguez, Ewa Antoszek, Fernando Aquino.
Author: Delphine Calle
Dans Racine et les trois publics de l’amour Delphine Calle analyse la séduction du théâtre racinien à partir des débats sur les passions du XVIIe siècle français. Concupiscence ou pur amour, amour-propre ou désir de plaire, l’amour est au cœur de la tragédie racinienne : moteur de l’action tragique, il émeut le public. Celui-ci est triple : le protagoniste amoureux est non seulement scruté par les spectateurs dans la salle, passionnés par la passion, il s’expose devant le personnage qu’il aime et paraît devant le tribunal de sa propre conscience. À l’instar des moralistes du XVIIe siècle, grands censeurs du théâtre, ce livre établit le parallèle entre les expériences amoureuse et théâtrale, pour mieux percer la dramaturgie de l’amour chez Racine.

In Racine et les trois publics de l’amour Delphine Calle unravels the seductive power of Racinian tragedy by turning to the 17th-century French debates on love. Whether it is staged as concupiscence or pure love, as self-love or the desire to please, love is at the heart of Racinian theatre: it sparks tragic action and moves its spectators. These spectators are threefold: the tragic lover is not only scrutinized by the real audience, who is passionate about passion, he also feels the gaze of his loved one and of his own conscience, that questions the value of his love. Following the 17th- century moralist theatre critics, this monograph aligns amorous and theatrical experiences, in order to reveal Racine’s dramaturgy of love.
Thinking the Cinemakeover in the Film-Philosophy Debate
What is ‘the good’ of the film experience? And how does the budding field of ‘film as philosophy’ answer this question? Charting new routes for film ethics, Martin P. Rossouw develops a critical account of the transformational ethics at work within the ‘film as philosophy’ debate. Whenever philosophers claim that films can do philosophy, they also persistently put forward edifying practical effects – potential transformations of thought and experience – as the benefit of viewing such films. Through rigorous appraisals of key arguments, and with reference to the cinema of Terrence Malick, Rossouw pieces together the idea of an inner makeover through cinema – a cinemakeover – which casts a distinct vision of film spectatorship as a practice of self-transformation.