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James Bay Cree Students and Higher Education

Issues of Identity and Culture Shock

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Christopher Darius Stonebanks

This book examines the continuing challenges of lingering colonial cultural imperialism on the James Bay Cree, through an examination of the relationship between Cree students and the current “mainstream higher education” system. Culture shock and identity formation are central themes as the book investigates the uneven relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous authority in North America, dispelling notions of living in a “post-colonial” context. Well suited to a number of interests, such as Multiculturalism, Native/Indigenous studies, Sociology, Curriculum Studies, Cultural Comparative Education, Qualitative Research and more, readers will gain an understanding or simply benefit from a confirmation and validation of the complexities regarding “Native education”.

Leadership for Learning

International Perspectives

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Edited by John Macbeath and YC Cheng

The impact of globalization is being felt in numerous spheres of educational policy and practice, in rapid growth of information and communication technologies, in economic transformation, and international market competition, all of which conspire to create new demands and place new pressures on school leadership.
Drawing on examples from 12 countries in different parts of the world. The Editors have brought
together 28 renowned scholars in Europe, Australia, North America, and Asia-Pacific countries to contribute to this book. The first six chapters address key themes and provide the framework for the 12 country reports which follow. With the aim of increasing international understanding and teasing out issues of transfer and application across cultural and linguistic boundaries, we have chosen national reports which cover a range of countries representing a diversity of culture and contextual backgrounds. We believe, these chapters and the book as a whole, can provide important theoretical, policy and practical implications that will inform the debate about the future of education and of schooling. While each of these country narratives underscore the importance of context, at the same time there are insights and values held in common.

Leonardo's Vision

A Guide to Collective Thinking and Action

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Valerie A. Brown

Military Pedagogies

And why they matter

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Edited by Tone Kvernbekk, Harold Simpson and Michael A. Peters

Armed conflict is an inescapable reality in the world today. Military institutions and their activities both in peacetime and in wartime are a fact of life in western democracies and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Preparation of the men and women who are sent by their governments to fight or keep the peace is a life and death matter for those charged with the education and training of the Armed Forces. The development of military pedagogies is an attempt to address and reconcile the principles of education and military necessity. The enduring requirement is for an operationally effective yet ethically acceptable military organisation that is accountable to the society that it serves and to global ethical standards. This book provides new perspectives on the role of education in the Armed Forces of a democratic state. The wide ranging perspectives offered reflect the contributors who are from diverse professional backgrounds including serving military officers, academics and educators employed in military academies as well as social scientists. This book is aimed at those interested in policy and practice although it also provides more theoretical analyses that will interest academics and the general public.

Neighborhoods of the Plantation

War, Politics and Education

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Kaustuv Roy

The plantation is a slave society, a means and a system of usurpation of life energies and bodily productive capacities in the service of endless bankruptcy on the one hand and elite persuasions on the other. The book argues, in part, that war or State organized violence is one of the most efficient means of the elite transfer; the wreckage through war and destruction of ordinary livability opens up the human as organic compounds in the turning of human life into global plantation assets. More importantly, the book argues that this is possible only by means of certain ontological and epistemological deployments that make war on the human-ecological inevitable and even acceptable. This is where pedagogy comes in. The temporal being, the spatial being, and the linguistic being of the human-ecological are explored as three dimensions of captivity as well as the means of escape. The book rejects the politics of power as inimical to the very becoming of the human and posits the politics of strength as a new possibility that breaks with the plantation system of organized violence and vampiric wealth production.

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Peter Roberts and Michael A. Peters

This book addresses key developments in higher education and research policy over the past decade. The authors pay particular attention to policy changes in New Zealand following the formation of a Labour-Alliance coalition government in 1999. From 1999 to 2008, a version of ‘Third Way’ politics has been applied in the New Zealand context. A key government goal has been to advance New Zealand as a ‘knowledge society and economy’, and education at the tertiary level has been seen as crucial in achieving this. Neoliberalism, Higher Education and Research considers the relationship between neoliberalism and the Third Way, discusses international trends in knowledge capitalism, examines performance-based research funding, critiques the rhetoric of ‘quality’ and ‘relevance’ in recent higher education policy, and assesses possibilities for critical citizenship and intellectual life in the 21st century. Much can be learned from the New Zealand experience in reflecting on policy developments in other countries, and this book will be of interest to all who ponder the future of knowledge and education in a globalised world.

Nomadic Education

Variations on a Theme by Deleuze and Guattari

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Edited by Inna Semetsky

“This comprehensive and thoughtful volume is the first book to investigate, assess and apply a philosophy of education drawn from the great French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. It contains powerful and beautiful essays by some of the most influential Deleuze and Guattari commentators (the chapters by Bogue, Colebrook, May and Semetsky, and Genosko are particularly rewarding). The book provides very useful situations within the philosophy of education and some interesting experimental developments of Deleuze’s work, notably in terms of new technologies and original methods. This is then an indispensable work on Deleuze and education. It covers the historical background and begins shaping debates for future research in this exciting and growing area.” —Professor James Williams, Professor of European Philosophy, School of Humanities, University of Dundee, author of Gilles Deleuze’s Difference and Repetition: A Critical Introduction and Guide and The Transversal Thought of Gilles Deleuze: Encounters and Influences

“Deleuze always said that education was an erotic, voluptuous experience, perhaps the most important experience we can have. This collection captures that excitement and challenges what we think about how Deleuze should be taught and just as importantly what he taught.” —Ian Buchanan, Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory, Cardiff University, author of Deleuze and Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus and founding editor of Deleuze Studies

“Here are thirteen encounters with Deleuze’s work that not only testify of the creativity and newness of Deleuze’s own writing but that, by taking these ideas into the field of education, raise new questions, signal new problems, and provide genuinely new ways of educational thinking and being. A rich source of inspiration for anyone who believes that education should not be about the reproduction of what already exists but should be committed to what is to become.” —Gert Biesta, University of Stirling, author of Beyond Learning: Democratic Education for a Human Future; co-editor of Derrida & Education

Power, Pedagogy and Praxis

Social Justice in the Globalized Classroom

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Edited by Shannon A. Moore and Richard C. Mitchell

The aim of the text is to respond to gaps in an emergent discourse running along minority/majority world fault lines through various perspectives linking globalization, education and human rights. The editors’standpoint allows the consideration of equity in education as the foremost expression of social justice in this era of economic and technological globalization regardless of political or cultural contexts. This project continues the tradition of critical social pedagogy in creating common ground that accesses new approaches to political and classroom-based relations of power and praxis.

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Edited by Julia Resnik

"What impact does globalization have on the production of educational knowledge, and on the way scholars envisage education systems and education in general?
Western education systems are being transformed, and their role redefined, in light of the processes of globalization: education targets are being reshaped in response to global economic needs; education systems are rated according to international rankings and education itself has been packaged into a commodity that can be commercialized worldwide. In addition, globalization prompts more intimate contact with different types of societies, cultures and knowledge that defy our “universal” foundations and research tools. Has educational knowledge developed in a way that enables us to disentangle the new education configurations? In order to respond to this question this edited volume addresses four major challenges:
to understand the denationalization of education and the need to re-conceptualize this transformation.
to uncover the agents and the tools of educational globalization, such as the knowledge producers, international organizations and role of statistics.
to explore the implications of the emerging international educational institutions and international curricula.
to understand non-western education and integrating it into western educational knowledge.
These challenges are located at the core of the production of educational knowledge and are treated from a variety of viewpoints: sociological quantitative and qualitative scholarship, ethnographic accounts, socio-historical perspectives and philosophical reflections.
This book contributes to critical thinking about globalization and educational knowledge and, at the same time, opens our spirits to the theoretical opportunities and educational enrichment that the globalization era offers. This is a compelling collection for anthropologists, sociologists, educational researchers, and anyone who seeks to understand the need of new modes of thinking about education in the global era.
CONTRIBUTORS: Robert Arnove, Aaron Benavot, Eyal Ben Ari, Roser Cussó, Yossi Dahan, Roger Dale, Oren Lallo, Julia Lerner, Orna Naftali, Julia Resnik, Susan Robertson, Philip Wexler and Yossi Yonah.

Professional Care and Vocation

Cultivating Ethical Sensibilities in Teaching

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Timothy W. Wineberg

This book integrates the traditional understanding of a profession—a calling to selfless service for the public good, through the pursuit of a learned art—with that of vocation—work that offers a deep sense of personal fulfilment, meaning, and identity. Professions are moral endeavours since they require vulnerable individuals to trust in the competence and integrity of someone who professes to care for them. Currently, most versions of professional ethics narrowly focus upon standards of conduct or upon ethical dilemmas. Yet these are rarely compelling enough to change us—they are not morally formative.
This volume takes a different tack to doing ethics. It explicitly targets the moral development of educators. This is crucial because as we develop our sensibilities of perception and qualities of character, we can better interpret practice situations and respond fittingly. Moreover, this approach to ethics seeks to reconceptualize our professional obligation: to embody it in more adequate metaphors, and to revitalize its relational dimension. In this view, our task as educators is to seek out those relational metaphors, images, and narratives of practice which are profound enough to shape our self-perceptions and to fund our moral formation. This book explores five ethical spheres—sacrifice, community, craft, tradition, and moral imagination—and five respective pedagogical images which illuminate the nature of professional care—servant, moral friend, mentor, covenantor, and moral companion. When critically engaged and appropriated, these rich metaphorical images provide clarity, order, and meaning to our perceptions and powerful imperatives for our own moral development.