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Serious Educational Games

From Theory to Practice

Edited by Leonard Annetta

Serious Educational Games: From Theory to Practice focuses on experiences and lessons learned through the design, creation and research in the Serious Education Games Movement. Serious Games is a term coined for the movement that started in 2003 for using commercial video game technology for teaching and learning purposes. This book presents a collection of work that bridges the theory behind Serious Educational games and cutting edge research coming from many aspects in the field. The authors all have experienced Serious Games in education in their research and/or through personal game play.
While the literature base for educational games is growing at alarming rates, a theoretical framework by which future research will be conducted and practical examples of established work and work that continues to is the crux of this volume. This book is not all encompassing of the work being done with educational games but rather it provides lessons from the field in tangible projects. This book takes the reader through why Serious Games need to be used in K-12 education, the theory underlying why games work for teaching and learning, and how Serious Games are being used and researched.

Service Integration in Schools

Research and Policy Discourses, Practices and Future Prospects

Edited by Joan Forbes and Cate Watson

This is an important and timely collection in which recent research and interpretations are reported and debated. The papers provide a scholarly analysis of a range of significant issues, complexities and recurring themes. They provide theoretical, empirical and practical perspectives on what is involved in co-working and explore the ambiguities, contradictions and fragmentations in a new policy area that cuts across the remits previously held by a number of government departments. Overall, the papers provide a considered and wide-ranging critique of the key research and policy discourses that seek to influence the reformation of services and to remodel interprofessional and interagency working practices. In particular, the collection examines the ways in which the integration of services is operating in practice in the discrete policy contexts of the UK countries; the leadership and management of collaborative working and workforce remodelling; and whether, in addressing the hard questions of the form/s that future school services should take, there are any ‘global solutions’ from new research or from other places that might fruitfully be applied. In addressing these policy developments the collection has multiple readerships in mind and seeks to be both academic and policy relevant.

Social Justice Education for Teachers

Paulo Freire and the Possible Dream

Edited by Carlos Alberto Torres and Pedro Noguera

Social Justice Education for Teachers: Paulo Freire and the Possible Dream is a book that will help teachers in their commitment to and praxis of an education for social justice. The book traces the reception of Freire’s ideas in the USA, Canada, Latin America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia and provides some glimpses of topical yet seminal interventions in the philosophy of education, including studies of the relationships between Freire and Rousseau, Freire and Dewey, or Freire and Gramsci. In addition it addresses how Freire’s ideas could be implemented in urban education, both in the industrialized and developing world, and how the debates about globalization today need to addressed also with the politics of liberation as a possible dream. Three of the authors, Moacir Gadotti, Carlos Alberto Torres, and José Eustaquio Romão with the help of Paulo Freire, created the first Paulo Freire Institute in São Paulo, Brazil in 1991, and worked very closely with Freire for more than two decades, while the remaining scholars/activist are noted Freirean scholars and urban educators devoting their research, teaching and political activism to promote tools of conviviality and models of policy that will make this a better world, a less ugly world, a world, in the words of Freire, where it will be easier to love.

Symbolic Movement

Critique and Spirituality in Sociology of Education

Series:

Philip Wexler

This is a book about sociology of education—past, present and future.
In the first section the author chronicles and specifies the changes in the field, in a reflexive sociology of education, tracing the path out of liberalism, through radicalism and postmodernism, to an emergent new age stance in understanding education in society. Section two looks in more detail how these movements have actually worked in education and society.
The third section places the historical, macrosocial analysis of education and society on the smaller, more everyday screen of school life. Based on the author’s studies in high school, the question of identity and education is the fulcrum for a series of concrete studies or school portraits, which connect public social change and more personal, everyday life and identity with the social process of schooling.
The final section probes the new age theme. Questions of spirituality, rationality, magic, mysticism and sublimation are related to changes both in education and in sociology of education. What does it mean to do educational research in a re-sacralized, mystical society? And, does a new theory of sociology of education emerge on a Weberian rather than Durkheimian-functionalist or Marxist-radical view of the directions and reversals that begin in modernity and become more evident in our times?

Edited by Gerald Kulm

This book presents a coherent collection of research studies on teacher knowledge and its relation to instruction and learning in middle-grades mathematics. The authors provide comprehensive literature reviews on specific components of mathematics knowledge for teaching that have been found to be important for effective instruction. Based on the analysis of video data collected over a six-year project, the chapters present new and accessible research on the learning of fractions, early concepts of algebra, and basic statistics and probability.

The three sections of the book contain chapters that address research on the development of mathematics knowledge for teaching at the undergraduate level, instructional practices of middle-grades teachers, and the implications of teacher knowledge of mathematics for student learning. The chapters are written by members of a research team led by the Editor that has been working for the past six years to develop practical and useful theories and findings on variables that affect teaching and learning of middle grades mathematics.

Mathematics knowledge for teaching is a topic of great current interest. This book is a valuable resource for mathematics education researchers, graduate students, and teacher educators. In addition, professional developers and school district supervisor and curriculum leaders will find the concrete examples of effective teaching strategies useful for teacher workshops.

Edited by Gillian Judson

This book offers a detailed examination of imagination in learning. Teachers working with the ideas of Imaginative Education in their classrooms provide examples that cover multiple curricular areas and span elementary through secondary school contexts. “Imagination” has moved in recent years from being considered some kind of educational frill to a recognized main workhorse of teaching and learning. It is this new perspective that this book celebrates and exemplifies. The book is divided between teachers’ and researchers’ voices, both exploring a range of ways in which the imagination can be used in everyday classrooms to enhance learning and increase the satisfactions of teaching. This book demonstrates how engaging the imagination lies at the core of effective education.

Rosalind E. Hurworth

Over the past two decades there has been a plethora of book for students about how to tackle Qualitative Research (QR), but absolutely nothing on how to teach it! This book attempts to redress the imbalance by presenting a history of what is known about QR teaching, as well as to bring alive current QR teaching and learning through a set of Australian and British case studies. Courses visited were located within a variety of disciplines (including Education, Sociology, Anthropology, Nursing, Psychology, Communications and Evaluation), were taught by both experienced and inexperienced lecturers, were either presented alone or in pairs, took place in a range of institutions. lasted from seven weeks to a year and involved from 15 to over 100 students.
It emerged, however that, no matter what the context, several common issues were raised such as: Should you teach theory, practice or both? How do you determine a curriculum for a QR course? What is the best way to manage student projects? How should students of QR be assessed? In what ways can the constraints of University structures be confronted? and How can lecturer deficiencies in training and experience be overcome? To answer such questions, Professor Hurworth draws deftly from personal observations and rich conversations with both lecturers and students from all the courses described. As a result many practical ideas for moving the teaching and learning of QR forward, are suggested.

Teaching Scientific Inquiry

Recommendations for Research and Implementation

Edited by Richard A. Duschl and Richard E. Grandy

What are scientific inquiry practices like today? How should schools approach inquiry in science education? Teaching Science Inquiry presents the scholarly papers and practical conversations that emerged from the exchanges at a two-day conference of distinctive North American ‘science studies’ and ‘learning science’scholars. The conference goal: forge consensus views about images of inquiry that could inform teaching science through inquiry. The conference outcomes: recommendations for “Enhanced Scientific Method”, “Extended Immersion Units of Instruction”, and “Teacher Professional Development Models”. The edited volume will appeal to individuals interested in science learning as well as the design of learning environments. Scholars, policy makers, teacher educators and teachers will find this volume’s recommendations provocative and insightful. Twentieth century scientific advances with new tools, technologies, and theories have changed what it means to do science, to engage in scientific inquiry and to describe science as a way of knowing. Advances in ‘science studies’ disciplines are updating views about the nature of scientific inquiry. Advances in the cognitive and ‘learning sciences’ are altering understandings about knowledge acquisition, meaning making, and conditions for school learning. The conference papers, commentaries and panel reflections advance novel views about both children’s learning and the nature of science.

Teaching Through the Ill Body

A Spiritual and Aesthetic Approach to Pedagogy and Illness

Series:

Marla Morris

This book raises questions around pedagogy and illness. Morris explores two large issues that run through the text. What does the ill body teach? What does the teacher do through the ill body? The body has something to teach while teaching through the ill body. This book is theoretically framed by connections between spirituality and aesthetics. As the great spiritual traditions teach, our responsibility as teachers is to help others, especially those who are marginalized. What is lacking in our educational discourse is a discussion of the responsibility we all have to help those who get sick and not marginalize them. More specifically, pedagogical and curricular questions are fleshed out through working in the area of curriculum studies, depth psychology and the medical humanities. These three disciplines have something in common: autobiography. But in the field of curriculum studies autobiographies/ pathographies of sickness are few and far between. This book is meant to fill that gap in the educational literature. This pathography is a study that explores the mysteries of suffering, storytelling, memory, and poesis. Compassion, woundedness, vulnerability, testimony and authenticity are all issues Morris raises here. Teachers, scholars, depth psychologists and medical educators might be particularly interested in this intensely felt narrative about what it is like for teachers to teach while suffering from chronic illness.

Series:

Edited by Ray Land, Jan H.F. Meyer and Jan Smith

Threshold Concepts within the Disciplines brings together leading writers from various disciplines and national contexts in an important and readable volume for all those concerned with teaching and learning in higher education.
The foundational principle of threshold concepts is that there are, in each discipline, ‘conceptual gateways’ or ‘portals’ that must be negotiated to arrive at important new understandings. In crossing the portal, transformation occurs, both in knowledge and subjectivity. Such transformation involves troublesome knowledge, a key concern for contributors to this book, who identify threshold concepts in their own fields and suggest how to deal with them.
Part One extends and enhances the threshold concept framework, containing chapters that articulate its qualities, its links to other social theories of learning and other traditions in educational research.
Part Two encompasses the disciplinary heart of the book with contributions from a diversity of areas including computing, engineering, biology, design, modern languages, education and economics. In the many empirical case studies educators show how they have used the threshold concept framework to inform and evaluate their teaching contexts. Other chapters emphasise the equally important ‘being and becoming’ dimension of learning.
Part Three suggests pedagogic directions for those at the centre of the education project with contributions focusing on the socialisation of academics and their continuing quest to be effective teachers.
The book will be of interest to disciplinary teachers, educational researchers and educational developers. It also is of relevance to issues in quality assurance and professional accreditation.