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Towards Globo Sapiens

Transforming Learners in Higher Education

Series:

Patricia Kelly

Global and local studies show that the present growth-based approach to development is unsustainable. If we are serious about surviving the 21st century we will need graduates who are not simply 'globally portable' or even 'globally competent', but also wise global citizens, Globo sapiens. This book contributes to what educators need to know, do and be in order to support transformative learning.
The book is based on work with large, socially and culturally diverse, first-year engineering students at an Australian university of technology. It shows that reflective journals, with appropriate planning and support, can be one pillar of a transformative pedagogy which can encourage significant and even transformative attitude change in relation to gender, culture and the environment. It also offers evidence of improved communication skills and other tangible changes to counter common criticisms that such work is "airy-fairy" and irrelevant.
The author combines communication theory with critical futures thinking to provide layered understandings of how transformative learning affected students’ thinking, learning and behaviour. So the book is both a case-study and a detailed response to the personal and professional challenges that educators all over the world will face as they try to guide students in sustainable directions.

Towards Humane Technologies

Biotechnology, New Media and Ethics

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Edited by Naomi Sunderland, Phil Graham, Peter Isaacs and Bernard McKenna

What are the ethical and political implications when the very foundations of life—things of awe and spiritual significance—are translated into products accessible to few people? This book critically analyses this historic recontextualisation. Through mediation—when meaning moves ‘from one text to another, from one discourse to another’—biotechnology is transformed into analysable data and into public discourses.
The unique book links biotechnology with media and citizenship.
As with any ‘commodity’, biological products have been commodified. Because enormous speculative investment rests on this, risk will be understated and benefit will be overstated. Benefits will be unfairly distributed. Already, the bioprospecting of Southern megadiverse nations, legally sanctioned by U. S. property rights conventions, has led to wealth and health benefits in the North.
Crucial to this development are biotechnological discourses that shift meanings from a “language of life” into technocratic discourses, infused with neo-liberal economic assumptions that promise progress and benefits for all. Crucial in this is the mass media’s representation of biotechnology for an audience with poor scientific literacy. Yet, even apparently benign biotechnology spawned by the Human Genome Project such as prenatal screening has eugenic possibilities, and genetic codes for illness are eagerly sought by insurance companies seeking to exclude certain people.
These issues raise important questions about a citizenship that is founded on moral responsibility for the wellbeing of society now and into the future. After all, biotechnology is very much concerned with the essence of life itself. This book provides a space for alternative and dissident voices beyond the hype that surrounds biotechnology.

Towards Scientific Literacy

A Teachers' Guide to the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science

Derek Hodson

This book is a guide for teachers, student teachers, teacher educators, science education researchers and curriculum developers who wish to get to grips with the vast and complex literature encompassing the history of science, philosophy of science and sociology of science (HPS). A number of books cover essentially the same ground, but what makes this book unique is that it is written from the perspective of science education. The author’s purpose is twofold. First, to identify, clarify and critique elements in the HPS literature that are of key importance in developing students’scientific and technological literacy, as defined in the opening chapter of the book. Second, to enhance teachers’ capacity to build and present curricula that afford a much higher profile to HPS than has been traditional. The significance of the book can be judged from the prominence given to nature of science understanding in much recent international debate and writing in science education and in the plethora of influential reports on science and technology education published around the world that identify HPS knowledge and understanding as central components of 21st century science education.

Transformative Teaching

Promoting Transformation Through Literature, the Arts, and Jungian Psychology

Darrell Dobson

This is a book that supports teachers, teacher educators and educational researchers as they strive for ways to make their work more authentic, more meaningful, and therefore more spiritual. Dobson describes the practices of exemplary teachers, offers a theoretical framework for transformative teaching, and includes useful examples that the reader can readily include in her own teaching and/or research. Dobson offers two innovative methods of teacher reflectivity (Interacting Narratives and Archetypal Reflectivity) and an original methodology of teaching literature and the arts that draws on the insights of depth psychology. Interwoven throughout the book is Dobson’s own story, that of an ‘at-risk’student who was deeply affected by his high school experiences with drama and literature.
The book will be of interest to teachers in all fields but particularly in literature and the arts. It will appeal to teacher educators, educational researchers, those interested in analytical psychology, those interested in narrative approaches to teacher education, and those interested in narrative approaches to educational research. It will be useful in courses that focus on the construction of teachers’ professional knowledge and reflective practices as well as methodology classes in literature, drama, and all the arts. The book will also be of interest in qualitative, arts-based research methodology classes.

The War Against the Professions

The Impact of Politics and Economics on the Idea of University

Series:

Judith J. Slater, David M. Callejo Pérez and Stephen M. Fain

The modern American university has, for more than a century, been the frontier where those who aspired to social and economic advancement ventured. Initially, the guides for the aspirants were the professors, who having earned the trust of both the general public and practitioners, provided the necessary foundation for entry into the profession. It was understood that what took place in the academy was an introductory experience as all professions require some form of supervised practical experience prior to being admitted into the profession. Research done by members of the academy served as the primary source of knowledge advancing the professions. Finally, those who were engaged in these acts of knowledge production were actively involved establishing pre-professional curriculum, teaching and evaluation, and they were held in high regard for this work.
The final quarter of the twentieth-century marked a shift in the general attitude toward the professorate and the academy. Trust was replaced with accountability and the high regard once enjoyed was undermined by suspicion. The traditional model of the academy once seen as a community of scholars was replaced by a new corporate mind-set. Production became more important than inquiry. These shifts resulted in a university where students were trained in response to the needs of others who defined the frontier for them. This shift responds to the mitra of the day.

Why Interculturalisation?

A Response to the Internationalisation of Higher Education in the Global Knowledge Economy

Series:

Xiaoping Jiang

This amazing, highly readable book breaks a new ground in revealing the dominant theories and policies that have had profound effects on the strategies to accommodate cultural diversity on university campus. Few have researched intercultural communication from macro to micro perspectives and applied a multidisciplinary approach by drawing on research from disciplines such as sociology, economics, politics, social psychology, management, communication, culture and language. This book has outlined an emerging concept of some considerable significance, interculturalisation, from a variety of contemporary perspectives, and indicated its conceptual potential in understanding the impact of higher education on globalisation, internationalisation and the knowledge economy. The book has also provided a critical assessment of the issues in globalisation and the internationalisation of higher education such as the homogenisation of cultures and the dominance of economic imperatives. In general, this book represents an original application of specialist literatures that develops certain theorisations and understandings together for the first time in a new constellation. Hence, the book provides an excellent contribution to the current interest in globalisation across disciplines, particularly to the research in intercultural communication.
It should be of great interest to philosophers, educators and researchers in the intercultural studies. This book is a significant and powerful work that is sure to invigorate interesting discussions of higher education and particularly intercultural education for years to come.
The publication of this book announces the emergence of an original approach to intercultural communication that scholars around the world will soon to appreciate.

Zakia Belhachmi

From a rationale of multiculturalism and a based on systemic approach grounded in the Arab-Islamic tradition, this book integrates history, education, science, and feminism to understand the implications of culture in social change, cultural identity, and cultural exchange. Dr. Belhachmi’s praxis maintains the relationship between socio-political movements, and their corollary scientific movements to explain women’s role in social change of the Arab-Islamic world; thus linking the region’s past and the present in a historical continuum. In one masterful move, she immediately engages into a discovery -journey of the 13 century old Arab-Islamic socio-cultural and intellectual history; thus exploring the independent Arab-Islamic Worldview of development, modernism, science, education, and discusses the corollary socio-political and reform movements that integrated women in the region’s governance over time. Thus, she not only highlights women’s involvement in social change as a recurrent cyclical phenomenon in the region, but also chronicles the women-led independent 120 years of Arab-Islamic feminist science.
Above all, Dr. Belhachmi offers an innovative operational three-levelled model of analysis of education and feminist practice that reconciles particularism and universalism, and yields to systemic analyses of women in education cross-culturally. In doing so, the book shifts focus from the “woman’s question” into the more radical issues of “women’s science” in the Arab-Islamic culture; illustrating with the work of al-Sa'dawi (Egypt) and Mernissi (Morocco). As such this study is both a groundbreaking epistemological study on the role Arab-Muslim women and social change over time, and an essential textbook on women in contemporary Arab-Islamic education, and social sciences.
In a tour de force, Dr. Belhachmi reclaims Arab-Islamic feminist scientific legacy as organic to the region’s institutional memory and its collective cultural reference, while restoring to Arab-Muslim women feminists; including herself, their epistemic space within the contemporary multi-discursive practice/space of international feminism.; thus offering us a timely pioneering book on Arab-Islamic feminist epistemology. Equally, she provides us with a new scientific framework for self-representation and cultural exchange much needed both in international education and “a new feminist international order.”
In brief, this is an original scholarly work that provides us with creative empowerment methods, qualitative methodologies and holistic conceptual tools; thus enabling us to re-think our “rapport to knowledge” and the place of knowledge itself and how its related research strategies can move us beyond the pitfalls of cultural relativism and scientism. As such, this is an invaluable addition to the literature on the Middle East and North Africa region (MENA) that will benefit the layman tremendously; and a must reference for specialists and students alike.

Beyond the Modern-Postmodern Struggle in Education

Toward Counter-Education and Enduring Improvisation

Series:

Ilan Gur-Ze'ev

"This book is an attempt to historically and conceptually address the present human condition and the current specific role of education as a distinctively creative symbolic violence. In doing so, the book reevaluates the various manifestations and conflicting alternatives to normalizing education. The author suggests a unique, Diasporic, counter-education that transcends modern politics, postmodern philosophical assumptions and spiritual telos towards an impetus for the re-birth of what the author refers to as the "enduring improviser". It is a first step towards a new critical language that addresses the challenges of globalizing capitalism, of the cyberspace, of racism and of the new antisemitism that springs from postcolonialism. The book calls for a creative rearticulation of the relations between the aesthetic, the ethical, the intellectual and the bodily dimensions of the cosmos and human life. It is an invitation for a new Diasporic religiosity, one which turns courageously towards the exile of the gods. It addresses the ever-strengthening-and-tempting-sophistication of the anti-humanistic dimensions of "our" postmodern pleasure machine, of pre-modern "redemption" projects and of modern deceiving offers for "emancipation". The book is of special relevance for students of critical sociology, critical philosophy, Jewish philosophy, cultural studies, feminist studies, education—and for all friends of the free spirit.

Censorship! ...or Selection?

Confronting a Curriculum of Orthodoxy through Pluralistic Models

Series:

Shaheen Shariff and Leanne Johnny

This book is a must read for academics, policy-makers and teachers who grapple with policy and pedagogical decisions about what to include or exclude in schools that cater to diverse stakeholders. Much has been written about controversial, litigious school censorship controversies relating to text and library books. Post-September 11th, these have expanded to banning of religious clothing and symbols. Court challenges emerge in the context of a global and political media backdrop that consistently reinforces anti-Muslim sentiment. The re-emergence of an extreme right-wing religious backlash against liberal civil liberties that endorse homosexuality, feminism, religious and racial equality create formidable dilemmas for educators, further complicated by the blurred boundaries of free expression, safety and privacy in cyber-space, as students increasingly communicate on-line. Shariff and Johnny argue that censorship is deeply rooted in hegemonic perspectives that sustain neo-colonial privilege and silence the social, historical and intellectual contributions of some students. This “curriculum of orthodoxy” supports discriminatory political/media stereotypes of non-Caucasian ethnic groups through “selection” that is in fact “censorship.” The authors introduce a Critical Legal Literacy model for teacher education that combines legal and digital literacies with critical educational pedagogy to help educators meet contemporary challenges through pluralistic, ethical and educational decisions.

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Edited by Klas Roth and Nicholas C. Burbules

This book offers an examination into the meanings of citizenship in the contemporary world, and trends that are forcing a rethinking of the concept in today’s nation-states. These changing meanings, in turn, give rise to new understandings of, and approaches to, citizenship education. The underlying values of participation, deliberation, and loyalty or patriotism that define different notions of citizenship are under strain in a world increasingly defined by global processes, by the rise of transnational or supranational institutions, and by interconnections that bring different cultures and value systems into closer contact with each other.
What does this new citizen look like? What does this new citizen need to know, or need to be able to do? To whom, and to what, is this new citizen loyal? One way to think about this new citizen is as a cosmopolitan”, a citizen of the world more than of any particular nation-state; another way to think about it is in terms of different kinds or levels of affiliation, existing simultaneously (to nation and to regional alliance, such as the European Union, for example). These conditions of citizenship, and of citizenship education, are rapidly changing and diverse - and in some instances they come into conflict.
This collection of essays an outstanding international group of scholars examines the tensions between national, transnational, and postnational conceptions of citizenship, brought back always to the grounded question of citizenship education and how to go about it. The authors illuminate the complexity and subtlety of these issues, and offer helpful guidance for rethinking the meanings and values that inform our educational endeavours.