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The Culture of Science Education

Its History in Person

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Edited by Kenneth Tobin and Wolff-Michael Roth

The Culture of Science Education: Its History in Person features the auto/biographies of the professional lives of 22 science educators from 11 countries situated in different places along the career ladder within an ongoing narrative of the cultural history of the field. Many contributors began to identify as science educators at about the time Sputnik was launched but others were not yet born. Hence the book articulates the making of a field with its twists and turns that define a career as a scholar in science education.
Through the eyes of the contributing scholars, the development of science education is seen in the United States and its spread to all parts of the world is tracked, leading to a current situation where some universities from overseas are exporting science education to the United States through graduate programs—especially doctoral degrees. Other key issues addressed are the conceptual personae, such as Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky, who have shaped the field of science education and how publishing in English in high-impact journals and obtaining external funds from private and governmental agencies have become driving forces in science education.
The Culture of Science Education: Its History in Person was written for science educators with an interest in the history of science education as it is experienced as lived culture. The book is intended as a reference book for scholars and as a text for graduate students involved in science education.

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Edited by Brett E. Shelton and David A. Wiley

A series of well argued but surprisingly entertaining articles go far to set the very foundations ofthe field of digital game based learning. This book is absolutely essential reading for anyone interested in games and learning and will be for years to come.
James Paul Gee, Mary Lou Fulton Presidential Professor of Literacy Studies, Arizona State University
Learning from serious games generates emotional discussions about the feasibility of games as effective learning devices. It is refreshing that the authors are committed to taking an empirical approach to the study of games and education—one of research and grounded theory, rather than advocacy. This volume in an important step in beginning to move beyond hype to a more firm foundation for the use of serious games.
M. David Merrill, Instructional Effectiveness Consultant, Visiting Professor Florida State University
This volume shows that serious inquiry into serious games is a real and valid pursuit. The book conveys that what we can gather about how people learn within computer-based games, and using games, contributes to how we go about designing new educational games, and using games in more formal learning environments. It offers a convergence of thoughts, perspectives, and ideals. . . that may not always agree, but lays all the cards on the table. It’s very useful to get all these perspectives in one place. The authors further substantiate that research into this emerging area is one of promise and one that yields important results—providing impact across industry and academia.
Clark Aldrich, Author of Simulations and the Future of Learning and Learning by Doing.

Doing Teacher-Research

A Handbook for Perplexed Practioners

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Wolff-Michael Roth

There are many teachers who think about doing research in their own classes and schools but who are perplexed by what appears to be involved. This book is intended for these perplexed practitioners, to provide them with an easily understandable narrative about the concrete praxis of doing research in their classrooms or in those of their teacher peers teaching next door or in the same school. The fundamental idea underlying this book is to provide an easily accessible but nevertheless intellectually honest text that allows teachers to increase their agency with respect to better understanding their praxis and the events in their classrooms by means of research.
The author draws on his experience of doing teacher-research while being a high school teacher and department head. Roth uses six concrete research studies that he has conducted alone or with peers to describe the salient parts of any teacher-researcher investigation including: what topic to study; issues of ethics and permissions from students, school, and parents; how and what sources to collect; how to structure resources; how to construct data from the materials; how to derive claims; and how to write a report/research study. Roth chose the case-based approach because cases provide the details necessary for understanding why and how he, as teacher-researcher, has made certain decisions, and what he would do differently today. Using this case-based approach, he allows readers to tie methods choices to situations that they likely are familiar with.

Enaction

Toward a Zen Mind in Learning and Teaching

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Domenico Masciotra, Wolff-Michael Roth and Denise Morel

This book is addressed to all those in the field of education or related fields, including teachers, teacher-trainers, consultants, and researchers, who are interested in exploring the question, “What does it mean to know, to learn and to teach?” Contrary to popular conceptions, an enactive perspective assumes that knowing and learning are not disembodied operations that take place solely in a person’s head. Rather, they are a function of the whole person who is firmly situated in the world and who acts in the world to transform it, just as she is transformed by it. The dynamic and transformational nature of knowing and learning are reflected in the relationship between the person and her world, a relationship that evolves through acting in and with the world rather than abstracting oneself from it. Knowing develops as a function of the person’s availability, that is, her full involvement and presence in the here- and-now. The aim of education is thus to foster the development of this relationship in a never-ending quest for deep interiority with the world.
Drawing on their experiences as teachers, curriculum developers, students, Zen practitioners, karateka, bicyclists, hobby mathematicians, and gardeners, the authors provide many concrete examples of what it means to think about knowing and learning in terms of enaction and how teachers and curriculum developers who take enactivism seriously might go about designing and implementing lessons.

The Ethics of Caring

Bridging Pedagogy and Utopia

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Tammy A. Shel

In a cold and heartless world, Tammy Shel’s The Ethics of Caring demonstrates that teaching can and should involve care for the student and a pedagogy of caring at the core of education. Combining philosophy with ethnography, Shel examines the definition of caring through the voices of five case studies of five teachers. The book demonstrates that despite the challenges they cope with, teachers can still make a difference in students’ lives and in society, by doing more than teach for the test. The book makes a significant contribution to the promotion of the ethics of caring in education and for humanity’s welfare.
Douglas Kellner
George F. Kneller Chair in the Philosophy of Education, UCLA
Tammy Shel’s study presented in this powerful book adds important dimensions to the understanding of "caring" in classrooms. Furthermore, the narrative and analysis of teachers, teaching, students, learning, and the contexts of schooling and communities provide for a deep theoretical and practical discussion of pedagogy vis-a-vis the larger purposes of education. The discussions of "caring, " as enacted in these cases, are a solid and sophisticated contribution to further comprehend its complexity and challenges, as well as an addition to the literature in the field. This book is a must read for students of teaching, for experienced practitioners, and for teacher educators who are interested in a humanistic, caring, and just education.
Jaime Grinberg
Professor, Educational Foundations, Montclair State University

Expanding Waistlines

An Educator's Guide to Childhood Obesity

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David Campos

Many health experts agree that childhood obesity is an epidemic in the modern world. In the United States alone, government data suggest that the number of overweight or obese children is nearly triple the number of 1980, and there are no signs that this incidence is decreasing. Information like this cannot be ignored or trivialized because excess weight can prove damaging to general wellness. Indeed, overweight or obese children and youth risk a wide range of medical complications. Extra pounds can also negatively impact their well-being, which can cause long-term mental health problems. In short, if the childhood obesity crisis is left forsaken, an unprecedented generation of youth will have a diminished quality of life.
Expanding Waistlines is ideal for child advocates and youth-serving professionals who seek to learn more about childhood obesity. A prominent feature of Expanding Waistlines is that each chapter poses a series of questions relevant to school personnel, such as:
• What can I do at my school and in my classroom?
• How should I approach my students who are overweight or obese?
• What are some key elements I should look for when evaluating a potential program?
Specifically, the book explores the factors that contribute to obesity in society and the associated risks of excess weight on children and youth. Subsequent chapters discuss how to promote healthy eating practices and regular physical activity at school and home. The final chapters report on specific resources. Expanding Waistlines also features the latest demographic data, BMI calculations and classifications, recommended guidelines for health, Wellness Policy requirements, and food label information.

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Edited by Roger L. Geiger, Carol L. Colbeck, Roger L. Williams and Christian K. Anderson

Public research universities are an integral part of American society. They play the leading role in educating future leaders in agriculture, engineering, the arts and sciences, humanities, business, education, and other professions. Public research universities generate the new products, processes, inventions, discoveries, insights, and interpretations that advance the human condition. The dominant centers of higher education in many states, public research universities are increasingly looked upon as major engines of economic development. And, through outreach, they harness their human and intellectual capital to serve their sponsoring societies. Yet state investment in public higher education is faltering and the role of public higher education is an area of ongoing debate. This flagging support, along with the growing perception that higher education is a private benefit rather than a public good, has put public research universities at a crossroads. With chapters by leading scholars, this book tackles these challenging issues—on learning resources; on competition; on the public and private benefits of public research universities; and on how best to create an environment for engaged learning. It brings into one collection informed arguments on the key issues facing the American public research university and serves as a valuable resource to students, scholars, and policy makers who are concerned about the future of these national assets.

Girls in a Goldfish Bowl

Moral Regulation, Ritual and the Use of Power amongst Inner City Girls

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Rosalyn George

What are the processes of exclusion and inclusion amongst girls’ friendship groups? Can friendship and bullying coexist? Is the leader in the class always the most popular member of the class? What is the role of the teacher in consolidating group friendships? How are culturally diverse friendships negotiated? What impact does the process of transition from primary to secondary school have on existing friendship networks? Through an exploration of the emotional and social dynamics of young girls’ friendship groups, this book addresses these and other questions, which are important in their lives. The girls that feature in this book are inner city preadolescent girls as they transfer from their inner city primary school to their secondary schools. The schools are all located within an urban context and represent the state and public sector of education. The girls encompass the diversity of ethnicities that are found within large urban communities and how they negotiate and manage their friendships across ethnic divisions is a key aspect of this book. By focussing on the constitution of the friendship groups, questions of ‘leadership’ and ‘popularity’, ‘race’ and ethnicity and ‘bullying’ are interrogated and their resonance for the ‘exclusionary’ and ‘inclusionary’ practices which often characterise friendship groups are examined.
This book highlights the emotional investment girls make in their friendships and will support teachers, youth workers and others working within educational contexts, in making visible this previously unattended aspect of young girls’ lives.

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Edited by Cushla Kapitzke and Michael A. Peters

Knowledge is about cultural power. Considering that it is both resource and product within the brave new world of fast capitalism, this collection argues for knowledge cultures that are mutually engaged and hence more culturally inclusive and socially productive. Globalized intellectual property regimes, the privatization of information, and their counterpoint, the information and creative commons movements, constitute productive sites for the exploration of epistemologies that talk with each other rather than at and past each other. Global Knowledge Cultures provides a collection of accessible essays by some of the world’s leading legal scholars, new media analysts, techno activists, library professionals, educators and philosophers. Issues canvassed by the authors include the ownership of knowledge, open content licensing, knowledge policy, the common-wealth of learning, transnational cultural governance, and information futures. Together, they call for sustained intercultural dialogue for more ethical knowledge cultures within contexts of fast knowledge capitalism.

Great Ideas in Science Education

Case Studies of Noted Living Science Educators

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Edited by Xiufeng Liu

Over the past four decades Science Education has emerged as a distinct field of research. This remarkable achievement is due to contributions by hundreds of science education researchers around the world. Today, we are in a position to apply a knowledge base that we can claim to be our own to inform science teaching and learning.
This book is a collection of case studies of select living science educators who have made significant contributions to the field of science education. It is a celebration of the science education field through the achievements of these individuals. This book presents major ideas of a few individuals who have been making great impact to the field of science education, through tracing their fruitful research careers and their contributions in science education. The case studies help readers develop an appreciation of how science education as a field has evolved, and of some great ideas the field has produced. These cases provide snapshots of the current science education knowledge base, and demonstrate the potential of this knowledge base for improving science teaching and learning.
This book is the perfect companion to The Culture of Science Education: Its History in Person by Kenneth Tobin, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, USA and Wolff-Michael Roth, University of Victoria, Canada previously published in this series. Together these two books offer a very personal and insightful view of the developments in the Science Education Field.