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Edited by Philip G. Altbach, Leslie A. Bozeman, Natia Janashia and Laura E. Rumbley

The field of higher education studies has expanded dramatically in recent years. This book provides a unique and comprehensive guide, including an inventory of 199 centers, programs, and institutes in the field, a essay analyzing the emergence and current status of higher education as an area of study, and a listing of 191 journals focusing on higher education. Together, these three resources constitute the more comprehensive overview of the field available anywhere. Philip G. Altbach’s essay ‘Research and training in higher education’ discusses the origins of the field, the central issues of concern in the research literature, and trends among centers and institutes focusing on higher education worldwide. The inventory, which constitutes most of the book, provides information on the centers and programs, including the names of staff members, focus of work, and relevant addresses and websites. The expansion in the number of journals in the field is illustrated in the journals listing, which provides information about editors, substantive focus, and addresses of journals throughout the world. This book is a unique resources and a benchmark for an emerging field.

Edited by Erkki Pehkonen, Maija Ahtee and Jari Lavonen

The Finnish students’success in the first PISA 2000 evaluation was a surprise to most of the Finns, and even people working in teacher education and educational administration had difficulties to believe that this situation would continue. Finland’s second success in the next PISA 2003 comparison has been very pleasing for teachers and teacher educators, and for education policymakers. The good results on the second time waked us to think seriously on possible reasons for the success. Several international journalists and expert delegations from different countries have asked these reasons while visiting in Finland. Since we had no commonly acceptable explanation to students’success, we decided at the University of Helsinki to put together a book “How Finns Learn Mathematics and Science?”, in order to give a commonly acceptable explanation to our students’success in the international PISA evaluations. The book tries to explain the Finnish teacher education and school system as well as Finnish children’s learning environment at the level of the comprehensive school, and thus give explanations for the Finnish PISA success. The book is a joint enterprise of Finnish teacher educators. The explanations for success given by altogether 40 authors can be classified into three groups: Teacher and teacher education, school and curriculum, and other factors, like the use of ICT and a developmental project LUMA. The main result is that there is not one clear explanation, although research-based teacher education seems to have some influence. But the true explanation may be a combination of several factors.

How should I know?

Preservice Teachers' Images of Knowing (by Heart ) in Mathematics and Science

Series:

Kathleen T. Nolan

Elementary preservice teachers’school experiences of mathematics and science have shaped their images of knowing, including what counts as knowledge and what it means to know (in) mathematics and science. In this book, preservice teachers’ voices challenge the hegemony of official everyday narratives relating to these images.
The book is written as a parody of a physical science textbook on the topic of light, presenting a kaleidoscope of elementary preservice teachers’ narratives of knowing (in) mathematics and science. These narratives are tied together by the metaphorical thread of the properties of light, but also held apart by the tensions and contradictions with/in such a critical epistemological exploration. Through a postmodern lens, the only grand narrative that could be imag(in)ed for this text is one in which the personal lived experience narratives of the participants mingle and interweave to create a sort of kaleidoscope of narratives. With each turn of a kaleidoscope, light’s reflection engenders new patterns and emergent designs. The narratives of this research text highlight patterns of exclusion, gendered messages, binary oppositions, and the particle nature and shadowy texture of knowing (in) mathematics and science. The presentation format of the book emphasizes the reflexive and polyphonic nature of the research design, illustrated through layers of spoken text with/in performative text with/in metaphorical text.
The metaphor of a kaleidoscope is an empowering possibility for a critical narrative written to both engage and provoke the reader into imag(in)ing a critical journey toward possibilities for a different “knowing by heart” in mathematics and science and for appreciating lived experience narratives with/in teacher education.

Series:

Patrick J. Lewis

If story is the basic principle of mind—then what are we doing in elementary schools? In this provocative exploration of narrative, the author writes from the idea that story is integral to the generation of meaning in human experience. Indeed, story plays a significant role in the formation of identity and the development of greater empathic understanding.
The text begins with a discussion of the epistemological and ontological nature of narrative in human understanding and then travels across the narrative landscape of the school setting. Through an examination of the impact of standards and accountability emphasis on curriculum, the author suggests current practice may be undermining student learning and engagement. Further, the author places oracy in temporary opposition to literacy, challenging us to rethink our assumptions about the role of literacy (ies) learning. Without negating the importance of literacy, attention is drawn to what is lost in chasing the assumed inherent good-ness of a text-based literacy and how this might hinder the growth of our children.
The value of narrative in developing teaching practice and promoting significant learning is brought to the foreground of the discussion, which naturally journeys into an exploration of curriculum raising serious questions about developmental approaches to curriculum construction. How we think but not in school will appeal to elementary teachers, early literacy teachers, teacher educators and those interested in narrative.

Mathematisation and Demathematisation

Social, Philosophical and Educational Ramifications

Edited by Uwe Gellert and Eva Jablonka

In this volume scholars from diverse strands of research have contributed their perspectives on a process of mathematisation, which renders social, economical or political relationships increasingly formal. At the same time, mathematical skills lose their importance as they become replaced by diverse technological tools; a process of demathematisation takes place. The computerization of financial transactions, calculation of taxes and fees, comparison of prices as well as orientation by means of GPS, visualisation of complex data and electronic voting systems—all these mathematical technologies increasingly penetrate the lifestyle of consumers. What are the perils and promises of this development? Who is in charge, who is affected, who is excluded?
A common concern of all the authors of this volume is an attempt to draw attention to issues related to the formatting power of mathematics and to its role as implicit knowledge, which results in a process of demathematisation. This process, having once received considerable attention, is now threatened to be eclipsed by the proliferation of a discussion of school mathematics, which shows a tendency of cutting off its own philosophical and political roots. Taken together, the contributions reveal a rather complex picture: They draw attention to the importance of clarifying epistemological, societal and ideological issues as a prerequisite for a discussion of curriculum.

Edited by Devorah Kalekin-Fishman and Pirkko Pitkänen

Conventional thinking maintains that people can belong to only one society and can be loyal to only one nation-state. In a world with rising rates of trans-national migration, however, the possibility of participation, belonging, and loyalty to more than one state is ever more evident. This has led to a rethinking of the notion of nation-based citizenship and increased tolerance toward holding citizenship in more than one country. In practice, over half of the world’s nation-states currently recognize some form of dual citizenship or dual nationality. This book focuses on clarifying and comparing how the rules of acquisition, maintenance, and revocation of dual citizenship have been modified and justified in eight states associated with the European Union: Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. The main question is: How have the rules of attribution, loss and/or acquisition of dual citizenship been modified and justified in these eight states? Viewed in the context of international covenants, legislation regarding dual and multiple citizenship is analyzed in terms of how it is made tangible in juridical, social, cultural, and educational domains.

Edited by Pirkko Pitkänen and Devorah Kalekin-Fishman

Once a rare phenomenon, multiple state membership and multinational citizenship has become almost commonplace with the rise in transnational mobility. This compilation analyses transnational participation focusing mainly on the interests of individual people and their transnational networks. The focus lies on the perceptions, attitudes, experiences and views on membership and participation of people with dual/multiple citizenship and individuals with multinational background who hold a single citizenship. Eight contributions present findings from the international research project Dual Citizenship, Governance and Education: A Challenge to the European Nation-State (DCE) conducted in 2002-2006 in Britain, France, Portugal, Germany, Finland, Greece, Estonia, and Israel.

Nietzsche, Ethics and Education

An Account of Difference

Series:

Peter Fitzsimons

Undermining the fundamental place of freedom, equality and universal reason, Nietzsche’s philosophy recognises that we occupy multiple and contradictory subject positions within social life. With no metaphysical realm of reason, no divine inspiration for morality, and no transcendental basis for human essence, we are left with the embodied, reflective and creative self as a source of ethics. From this perspective arises Nietzsche’s Übermensch, a continuous process of overcoming and becoming, interpreted as a metaphor for education that honours difference and incorporates otherness. The book explores the development of Nietzsche’s philosophy and its application to the problems of education, disturbing traditional liberal and democratic accounts of the relationship between individual and society. Threaded throughout is the author’s critique of the way educational institutions are driven by political and economic considerations, explored through notions of autonomy and subjectivity. The book is suitable for graduate students and academics wanting to engage either with postmodern interpretations of ethics in education, or with political philosophy in relation to development of self and community.

On Marx

An Introduction to the Revolutionary Intellect of Karl Marx

Series:

Paula Allman

On Marx introduces readers to the greatest intellect of the last millennium. Anyone who finds the 21st Century daunting, bewildering even frightening, or conversely, who has been too comfortable with the easy answers proffered by governments and the media, will discover that Marx provides unparalleled understanding and clarity as well as inspiration for engaging collectively in a type of praxis that holds the promise of both self and socio-economic transformation. We all live in the world of global capitalism, and no one has explained better than Marx how capitalism works, how it develops—now and in the future—and the consequences to be expected from the unfolding of its inner contradictions—from the growth of global poverty, the widening gap between the rich and the poor to the proliferation of endless war and environmental destruction.
On Marx also enables readers to distinguish between the real genius of Marx ‘s thought and a range of ideas that have been erroneously attributed to him and which, unfortunately, have clouded many people’s judgement of Marx. According to the author, if humanity is to have a chance for hope and ultimately peace and socio-economic justice, we need to open our minds to Marx—to give Marx a chance.

On the Outskirts of Engineering

Learning Identity, Gender, and Power via Engineering Practice

Series:

Karen L. Tonso

On the Outskirts of Engineering: Learning Identity, Gender, and Power via Engineering Practice falls at the intersection of research about women in sites of technical practice and ethnographic studies of learning in communities of practice. Grounded in long-term participation on student teams completing real-world projects for industry and government clients, Outskirts provides an insider look at forms of engineering practice—the cultural production of engineer identity, of the ways that gender is made real in such sites of practice, and of power relations that emerge in response to enculturated practices that organize everyday life. Outskirts contributes to understanding cultural obduracy and the movement of some men and most women to the outskirts of engineering.