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Navigating Uncertainty

Sensemaking for Educational Leaders

Shelley Hasinoff and David Mandzuk

In Navigating Uncertainty: Sensemaking for Educational Leaders, the authors introduce a 5-step sensemaking approach for managing the kinds of challenging problems, dilemmas and crises that occur daily in educational systems. Drawing on complexity theory, social capital, and sensemaking, they make the case that educational leaders can no longer rely on traditional scientific principles or their own instincts to manage complex problems but need a new way to think about their certainties and their relationships. The authors illustrate their approach with scenarios, based on the real-life experiences of principals, superintendents and deans and provide several innovative tools to help educational leaders better understand and navigate the uncertainties they face every day in their jobs.

The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World

Resources and Challenges Related to the Professional Work of Teaching

Edited by Hannele Niemi, Auli Toom, Arto Kallioniemi and Jari Lavonen

The teacher's role is changing rapidly throughout the world. Traditional ways of working as a teacher are being challenged and teachers are faced with new areas of expertise they need to manage as educational professionals. These characteristics, challenges, and changes in the teacher’s role have been identified internationally and are both conceptual and practical. Teachers’ work now includes much more than teaching in classrooms and has expanded to designing new learning environments, collaboration and networking with others and mentoring colleagues. The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World addresses the significance of considering these issues, researching them, and emphasising the importance of actively influencing and protecting the parameters of the teacher role.

Communicating Effectively and Meaningfully with Diverse Families

An Action Oriented Approach for Early Childhood Educators

Katia González and Rhoda Frumkin

Communicating Effectively and Meaningfully with Diverse Families: An Action Oriented Approach for Early Childhood Educators provides readers with opportunities to critically reflect upon the impact of culturally responsive practices and intercultural communication when communicating and collaborating with families. With a special focus on inclusive practices and ways to effectively develop partnerships with families, pedagogical strategies are provided highlighting specific case studies. The impact of critical reflection is also explored in this valuable monograph.

Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice

International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching

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Edited by Leon R. de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis

In Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice: International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching, Leon de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis provide new thinking, ideas and practices concerned with philosophically, pedagogically and actively developing arts learning and teaching. Interrogating successes and challenges for creativity education locally/globally/glocally, and using illustrative cases and examples drawn from education, practice and research, they explore unique local practices, agendas, glocalised perspectives and ways arts learning develops diverse creativities in order to produce new approaches and creative ecologies through inter- and cross-disciplinary teaching practices interconnecting beyond arts domains. This book highlights innovative approaches and perspectives to activating and promoting diverse creativities as new forms of authorship and analytic approaches within arts practice and education, along with the production of adaptable, sustainable pedagogies that promote and produce diverse creativities differently. This book will help educators, artists, and researchers understand and fully utilise ways they can transform their thinking and practice and keep their learning and teaching on the move.



Contributors are: Christine Bottrell, Pamela Burnard, Peter Cook. Susan Davis, Elizabeth Dobson, Leon R. de Bruin, Tatjana Dragovic, Martin Fautley, Robyn Heckenberg, Susanne Jasilek, Fiona King, Sharon Lierse, Shari Lindblom, Megan McPherson, Sarah Jane Moore, Amy Mortimer, Alison O'Grady, Mark Selkrig, Susan Wright.

Edited by Emmanuel Jean-Francois

This volume highlights patterns with transnational applications or facets that are nationally/culturally situated. The chapters provide insights on strategies and technologies for teaching and learning that are being used across the world in various unique national/cultural contexts. The perspectives reflect innovations in teaching and learning from Africa, Asia and the Middle East, Europe, Latin America, and North America.

Topics covered include: transnational innovative teaching, innovative learning technologies, electronic portfolio and self-directed learning, on-line teaching and learning in in-service teacher education, dual language learner, outcome-based education, E-learning and simulation, democratic assessment, deliberative dialoguing as a teaching/learning strategy, and smart glasses digital strategy for learning.

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.

A Man Comes from Someplace

Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time. Second Edition

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Judith Pearl Summerfield

A Man Comes from Someplace is a story of a lost world, a story in history of a multi-generational Jewish family from a shtetl in Ukraine before WWI. As cultural study, the narrative draws upon the oral stories of the author’s father, family letters, eyewitness accounts, immigration papers, etc., and cultural research. The narrative becomes a transformative space to re-present story as performance, a meta-narrative, and an auto-ethnography for the author to reflect upon the effects of the stories on her own life, as daughter of a survivor, and as teacher/scholar. Summerfield raises questions about immigration, survival, resilience, place and identity, how story functions as antidote to trauma, a means of making sense of the world, and as resistance, the refusal to be silenced or erased, the insistence we know the past and remember those who came before. In 2011, she found her way back to the place her family came from in Ukraine. The book is now being read by students in their ESL classes in Novokoonstantinov, Ukraine.

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Edited by Mark A. Fabrizi

Horror Literature and Dark Fantasy: Challenging Genres is a collection of scholarly essays intended to address the parent whose unreasoning opposition to horror entails its removal from a school curriculum, the school administrator who sees little or no redeeming literary value in horror, and the teacher who wants to use horror to teach critical literacy skills but does not know how to do so effectively. The essays herein are intended to offer opportunities for teachers in secondary schools and higher education to enrich their classes through a non-canonical approach to literary study. This book is a deliberate attempt to enlarge the conversation surrounding works of horror and argue for their inclusion into school curricula to teach students critical literacy skills.

Looking Back and Living Forward

Indigenous Research Rising Up

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Edited by Jennifer Markides and Laura Forsythe

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.

Writing Hope Strategies for Writing Success in Secondary Schools

A Strengths-Based Approach to Teaching Writing

Nicole Sieben

This book provides ways of thinking about the teaching of writing in secondary schools (with applications to college writing) and shares research-based strategies for immediate use in the classroom. The strengths-based, classroom-tested, student-centered writing hope strategies shared within the Writing Hope Framework (WHF) are designed to allow students to work within their own unique writing processes and insert their individual writers’ voices and styles authentically. The Writing Hope Framework allows students to choose which strategies and stages of the writing process they wish to engage in for purposeful writing goal attainment; it recognizes unique writing approaches and accounts for these differences in curricular design and implementation. Teachers can assess the writing abilities and self-beliefs of the students in their classes using a variety of strategies provided and then guide students in their pathways selection processes for writing.
Given the nature of this research and its application, it is the intention of this book to bring readers through a process of hope that can facilitate life hope and writing hope in the classroom for and with students. Hope is not exclusively for the already hopeful students; it is also, and perhaps more critically, for those students who do not presently see hope in their lives but who can. Every student is capable of hope if it is facilitated effectively and purposefully.