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Buying your Way into Heaven

Education and Corruption in International Perspective

Series:

Edited by Stephen P. Heyneman

Education is commonly thought to be a haven for the young. No matter how unstable the polity, no matter how dismal the prospects for the economy, education investments are often treated as sacrosanct. This is one reason for the popularity of education as part of foreign aid. Who could object to providing more opportunity for young people to study? Recently however, it has been discovered that education systems can be as corrupt as other parts of government and the economy; and that values of fairness and impartiality, once thought to be universal characteristics of education systems, can be supplanted by the interests of specific individuals, families and ethnic groups. Education corruption has now been found in all regions of the world, but it manifests itself in different ways. How do these differ from one region to another? What should be done to minimize education corruption? And what should be done to protect universities and employers in areas situated where there is little corruption from the products of those parts of the world where education corruption is the norm. This book will explain the meaning of education corruption and how it works; it will provide illustrations from Asia, Africa, Southeastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and it will propose actions and policies on the part of regional and international agencies to counter-act what is now likely to become a new and unexpected global crisis.

A Carpenter's Daughter

A Working-Class Woman in Higher Education

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Renny Christopher

A Carpenter’s Daughter is the story of the difficulties and rewards of the educational system for one who was not meant to go through it. The single most reliable predictor of whether someone will earn a BA is whether at least one of their parents has one-yet, today, there are an increasing number of first-generation college students. A Carpenter’s Daughter is both a memoir of the author’s experiences growing up, going to school, and becoming an academic and a thoughtful commentary on the meaning of class in American culture. By connecting her own story with ideas from scholarly works on class and identity, Christopher shows how her individual experiences reflect common struggles that people of working-class background face when their education, profession, income, and lifestyles change. This work reminds us forcefully that "moving up" isn't necessarily good and that changing one’s class isn't as simple as going to class or even becoming the teacher of the class.—Sherry Linkon, author of Teaching Working Class The work is stellar, merging the tangled and complex webs of social mobility through education in ways that leave lots of loose ends dangling just the way it should. No pretty bows adorning carefully wrapped packages here. No straight and narrow trajectory toward a mainstream version of success. Instead, readers will be pulled along by nuanced narratives portraying the warped nature of society’s construction of success and a careful crafting of the book in its entirety as a disjointed text presenting shards of a life that can never be visible in a tidied-up tale.—Stephanie Jones, University of Georgia

Challenges Bequeathed

Taking up the challenges of Dwayne Huebner

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Edited by Patrick J. Lewis and Jennifer Tupper

In this thoughtful and provocative collection of essays, a group of scholars from varied backgrounds and interests have each taken up the educational challenges bequeathed by Dwayne Huebner in his 1996 essay, “Challenges Bequeathed”.
Huebner encouraged educators to surpass the technical foundations of education, affirm the significance of the imagination, use the world’s intellectual traditions and achievements, engage in public discourse about education, and speak out for children and youth. Each author has extended, and in some ways transcended, the discussion of these five challenges yet still draw upon the considerable contribution Dwayne Huebner has made to the field of education.
The writers in this volume grapple with the complexities of teaching and learning as always in process and as always relational; of schools as sites of creative and imaginative acts of knowing and being.
The book begins with Huebner’s 1996 essay wherein he delineates the challenges for educators, as he perceived them. Readers are invited to begin with this chapter. However, after taking in Professor Huebner’s “prescience, his ability to see, years in advance of everyone else, what is deeply at work in present times, where it is headed, and what needs to be done about it…” (Smith, this volume) we encourage readers to dip into this volume randomly rather than in sequential order. While doing so, it is important to be mindful that “these challenges do not exist in isolation of each other; rather they are inextricably linked in myriad ways. Each one of these challenges requires consideration of classroom spaces, the individuals who occupy these spaces, and how these spaces are influenced by external forces” (Tupper, this volume).
We invite you to take up a challenge.

The Civic Gospel

A Political Cartography of Christianity

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William M. Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

This book is a result of the times in which we are living. These times demand a response. When the authors began to write this book, it was not popular to dissent against the Bush administration. In fact, dissent was and still is equated with terrorism. Now, it might seem that the tide is turning and maybe after the 2008 election some of this nightmare we have been experiencing will change. At least that is the optimistic view. But there are small traces that the struggle the authors discuss in this book will continue well into the 21st century.
The intermingling of the political and the religious is still swirling in the present context. The Civic Gospel, as the authors discuss it, is the notion that preaching the Gospel is preaching politics and vise versa. This book is about that struggle and the issues related to it.

The Collaborative Turn

Working Together in Qualitative Research

Edited by Walter S. Gershon

"Pulling back the curtain on the collaborative process, Walter Gershon’s stunning new collection highlights the complex, multi-dimensional nature of qualitative research today. The Collaborative Turn: Working Together in Qualitative Research powerfully deepens and richens ongoing discussions around collaborative inquiry so central today. Drawing together a wide range of senior and emergent scholars, as well as a span of traditional and experimental approaches, this cutting-edge text is ideal for both new and seasoned scholars alike. -- Greg Dimitriadis, Professor, University at Buffalo, SUNY Gershon's edited volume on emerging collaborative methodological practices is a welcome resource for qualitative researchers who want to make their research more transparent, improvisational, and reflexive. It juxtaposes the latest reflections of innovators like Lather, Smithies, and Clandinin with new forms of collaboration in the arts and PAR. This interdisciplinary approach provides much food for thought that will surely inspire even bolder methodological experimentation. -- Douglas Foley, Professor of Cultural Studies in Education and of Anthropology, The University of Texas-Austin This book presents invaluable (and rarely seen) reflections on collaboration, which is a central practice for qualitative researchers, across disciplines. The authors examine their relationships and experiences with other researchers and with participants, resulting in an engaging text that explores the methodological and ethical implications of generating meaning in collaborative interactions. The end result is a ‘must-read’ text that educates and enlightens about the joys and challenges of collaborative research. -- Lisa M. Given, Director, International Institute for Qualitative Methodology, University of Alberta It is evident that qualitative research must be a social activity. But like so much in social life, it is taken for granted in the everyday practice of this methodology. This book lays bare the collaboration that is often unspoken on our work. Authors in Walter Gershon’s The Collaborative Turn push at current methodological boundaries enabling us to see the social practice of qualitative research in novel, creative, and artistic ways. -- George W. Noblit, Joseph R. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education, UNC-Chapel Hill"

Competition

A Multidisciplinary Analysis

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Edited by Wade B. Worthen, A. Scott Henderson, Paul R. Rasmussen and T. Lloyd Benson

The Super Bowl. Democrats vs. Republicans. Ford vs. Chevy. Bloods vs. Crips. Public vs. private schools. Sibling rivalries. Competition permeates every aspect of our society, and we place great confidence in its ability to allocate resources efficiently, spur innovation, and build personal character. As others have argued, competition is now a paradigm—a conceptual framework that is often taken for granted but rarely challenged. In this book, experts examine competition from their own disciplinary perspectives. From economics to philosophy, biology to education, and psychology to politics, the origins and applications of this paradigm are placed in historical context, its mechanics are analyzed, and its costs and benefits are assessed.
The questions addressed in this book are important and varied. What is the historical genesis of the competition paradigm? How is competition manifest in our culture—in religion, politics, economics, sports, business, and education—and are its effects always beneficial? What can we learn about the mechanics of competition from studying nature? Are humans naturally competitive, or is it a learned behavior? How does competition affect our mental and physical well-being? Is competition the best strategy for allocating finite planetary resources to an expanding human population? The book also engages a cooperative alternative, and asks: Is there an ethical tension between competition and cooperation? Why have cooperative models been undervalued and marginalized? Can cooperation increase innovation and efficiency? This collection provides a broad, insightful, and productive examination of one of the dominant concepts of our time.

The continuum of secondary science teacher preparation

Knowledge, questions, and research recommendations

Edited by Angelo Collins and Nicole Gillespie

The mission of the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation (KSTF), to increase the quantity of high quality high school science and mathematics teachers in United States High Schools, calls for a deeper understanding of what it takes to prepare and support successful teachers. On September 21, 2006, KSTF convened a group of 41 individuals with a broad range of perspectives and expertise to address three essential questions with regard to secondary science teacher preparation: What do we know, what do we need to find out, and what research will help us fill in the gaps? Participants were intentionally selected from a diverse cross section of the education community and included teachers, educational researchers, teacher educators, policy specialists and scientists. The 41 participants formed 12 working groups and spent two and a half days addressing the following aspects of teacher preparation:
· recruitment and retention; · models of secondary science teacher preparation; · pedagogic preparation including field-based experiences, methods courses, and preparing teachers for diverse populations; · content preparation in biology, chemistry, Earth science, and physics as well as the nature of science in general; · induction; · mentoring.
Each working group was tasked with synthesizing their discussions and conclusions for the entire group of conference participants and in a written document. This volume represents the final outcome of that conference; 12 chapters that reflect the work of 40 dedicated scholars and practitioners who share a deep commitment to the pursuit of excellence in the preparation of secondary science teachers.

Roza Leikin, Abraham Berman and Boris Koichu

This book breaks through in the field of mathematical creativity and giftedness. It suggests directions for closing the gap between research in the field of mathematics education and research in the field of creativity and giftedness. It also outlines a research agenda for further research and development in the field.
The book consists of a balanced set of chapters by mathematicians, mathematics educators, educational psychologists and educational researchers. The authors of different chapters accept dynamic conception of creativity and giftedness.
The book provides analysis of cognitive, affective and social factors associated with the development of creativity in all students and with the realisation of mathematical talent in gifted students. It contains theoretical essays, research reports, historical overviews, recommendations for curricular design, and insights about promotion of mathematical creativity and giftedness at different levels.
The readers will find many examples of challenging mathematical problems intended at developing or examining mathematical creativity and giftedness as well as ideas for direct implementation in school and tertiary mathematics courses. They will also find theoretical models that can be used in researching students’ creativity and giftedness. Research reports enlighten relationships between excellence in mathematics and creativity and examine different aspects of inquiry-based environment as a powerful way for developing mathematical creativity in school students. The readers can also learn about characteristics of creativity of research mathematicians.

Series:

Edited by David B. Zandvliet

Research in environmental education (EE) is a growing field of inquiry and should be seen as respondent to a variety of program developments around the world. These diverse programs are the context for this body of educational research. Diversity in EE research is also compounded when one considers the various cultures, epistemologies and research traditions that may inform the field. This complexity accounts for the range of forms for environmental learning in formal, informal or non-formal contexts.
There is a good deal of evidence that, in order to be more responsive to the needs of diverse populations, program developments around the world are now beginning to reflect the variation in our society. However, the same cannot always be said in terms of research methodologies within mainstream environmental education research. Outside of a few examples, there seems to have been very little in the way of development of research genres aimed at understanding, characterizing and supporting cultural diversity within much of mainstream environmental education. Diversity of method may also be important for the overall quality (or health) of environmental education research. To locate many of the new ideas and approaches in this area, one needs to look outside environmental education, towards general educational research, or to other fields such as environmental justice, indigenous education, science education and health education to name only a few examples.
This volume of original research reports from around the globe begins to richly describe aspects of diversity in environmental education research. It does so in two ways: first, it mirrors the diversity of voices and cultures that are conducting research in this ever-broadening and increasingly global and international field of inquiry, second: it illuminates a potential diversity of research methods by highlighting a range of methodologies salient in other fields which have emerging promise for the practice of research in environmental education.

Drawn Toward Transformation

Conversations on Teaching and Learning Drawing

Nadine Kalin

This book examines the transformative potential of collaborative teacher research. Specifically, Kalin shares the perspectives of educators as they investigate the teaching and learning of drawing within their own elementary classrooms and within the context of an action research group. The innovative a/r/tographic design of the project provides a rich balance between the arts and educational research,
as it allows for the complex unfolding of relational transformation, alongside the artistic renditions of each person exploring their understandings of drawing. The products and processes of this book provide alternative approaches for the design of future pre-service and in-service programs that aim to serve teachers as learners rather than teachers as teachers. In this vein, the book offers worthy insights into how the arts and collaborative action research groups assist participants in finding other ways of seeing, imaging, and knowing the world. The book will appeal to practitioners, teacher educators, educational researchers, as well as those interested in professional development, complexity thinking, curriculum studies, collaborative action research, and arts-based educational research methodologies.