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Without a Margin for Error

Urban Immigrant English Language Learners in STEM

Series:

Jeremy B. Heyman

In Without a Margin for Error, the author chronicles the journeys of young adults in an under-served urban community who are new to the English language into STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-related) fields from high school through college. He distills lessons, themes, and policy recommendations from the trails blazed by these students toward altering the status quo around college access and STEM success for often-marginalized but highly resilient young adults with much to contribute to their new nation, their communities, and the world. While drawing on a critical ethnography of over three dozen inspiring young adults, seven students are chronicled in greater depth to bring to life crucial conversations for redefining college readiness, access, and success in STEM fields.

The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.

The Narrative of Mathematics Teachers

Elementary School Mathematics Teachers’ Features of Education, Knowledge, Teaching and Personality

Edited by Dorit Patkin and Avikam Gazit

The issue of mathematics teaching and its impact on learners' attainments in this subject has continuously been on the public agenda. The anthology of chapters in this book consists of varied up-to-date studies of some of the best mathematics education researchers and mathematics teaching experts, exploring the varied aspects of this essential. The book depicts the elementary school mathematics teachers' world while relating to three aspects which comprise the professional environment of mathematics teachers: Teachers' education and teachers' knowledge, Teaching and Teachers' personality. The chapters are written on a level which addresses and might interest a wide readership: researchers, in-service teachers, pre-service teachers, parents and learners.

Reel Big Bullies

Teaching to the Problem

Series:

Brian C. Johnson and James E. Vines

Talk with students about bullying in their schools/communities and three themes are likely to emerge: a) there’s nothing anyone can do about it, b) bullying is necessary as it builds character, and c) there needs to be more educational programming in the schools designed to curb bullying behavior.

Contrast those sentiments with the helplessness teachers and administrators feel. Many will tell you that current state and federal guidelines tie their hands until after an incident occurs. In other words, a student must get hurt before the school is able to do anything. Reel Big Bullies is designed for regular anti-bullying campaigns and will not cost struggling districts thousands of dollars to implement as it provides teachers with educational resources to complement regular instruction in classrooms.

Using clips from Hollywood blockbusters like Knocked Up, The Emperor’s New Groove, The Benchwarmers and others, Reel Big Bullies is designed to help students, administrators, teachers and counselors create a safer school environment for all students. It is also intended to help all students understand the terrible toll bullying can take on its targets, and to encourage students to stand up for their classmates who are being bullied.

The book’s framework follows the three themes above and discusses the pertinent legal and policy decisions affecting educational intervention. With the already busy (overwhelmed) teacher in mind, we describe nearly 200 film clips teachers can show in class to promote and spark discussions with students in middle and high schools.

Through the Fire – From Intake to Credential

Teacher Candidates Share Their Experiences through Narrative

Series:

Cleveland Hayes, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Hillary B. Eisworth and Kimberly White-Smith

By applying an auto-ethnographic approach in this volume to share and explore the experiences of prospective teachers as they navigate the preparation and credentialing processes of teacher education, we – as those who have gone before the future educators in this text and those who will come behind them, gain first hand insights from these young women and men about what it means and how to better prepare prospective educators to become a teacher against a backdrop of historical inequities in schooling and prepared for the multi-culturally diverse classrooms of today. Teacher educators, school and community leaders, and others committed to pushing toward more equitable social domains and forms of living and learning hence would do well to take up the opportunity provided in this text to learn from the narratives included in this volume and those of other teacher candidates; indeed, the narratives of teacher candidates herein and elsewhere are, in part, reflections of ourselves as teacher educators and evaluations of our work in teacher education and the professional preparation of those who will carry on our professions after us and for rising generations. What we as teacher educators teach, or think we are teaching, in teacher preparation courses may, or may not, be what prospective teachers are learning about being a teacher and successful teaching and learning for all learners, particularly those students historically underserved.

Each of the prospective educators who share their narratives in this volume are striving to become critical educators capable of promoting equitable educational and social opportunities, outcomes, and experiences for all learners. While their journeys are each distinctive and unique to them personally, the teacher candidates who share their narratives in this volume highlight some of the challenges and opportunities they have encountered in teacher preparation courses to learn about the functioning of social structures that sustain society’s existing hierarchies and develop the skills and knowledge requisite to identify, implement, and assess critical learning strategies aimed at challenging inequities and promoting more inclusive forms of education. Specifically, these future teachers included in this volume are sharing with us, their readers, their attempts at learning to unhook from Whiteness and to disrupt the pernicious and historical school-to-prison pipeline that has long existed in the US between the nation’s prison system and schools serving learners and their families and communities identified as racially not White, economically poor, and otherwise not members of the White, middle-class, primary English speaking, heterosexual, patriarchal mainstream.

School Space and its Occupation

Conceptualising and Evaluating Innovative Learning Environments

Series:

Edited by Scott Alterator and Craig Deed

School Space and its Occupation addresses the ongoing and pressing need for justification of education and environmental innovation. Further, the increasingly important work of evaluating the new learning spaces brings attention to the need for conceptual and methodological clarity.

The editors have assembled a collection of leading authors to explore the links between education and design, progression of ideas in education and architecture, as well as making sense of pedagogical trends and spatial and design relevance. Post-occupancy evaluation is capable of informing both educational and architectural questions to generate sustainable adaptations for educators and designers. Part 2 focuses on the occupancy phase and examines the lived experience of schools to draw conclusions and make recommendations focused impacts and methodological progression.

Contributors: Renae Acton, Scott Alterator, Benjamin Cleveland, Craig Deed, Matthew Dwyer, Debra Edwards, Neil Gislason, Wesley Imms, Peter Lippman, Elizabeth Matthews, Marcus Morse, Vaughan Prain, Matthew Riddle, Warren Sellers, Rebecca Townsend, and Adam Wood.

Series:

Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek

To consider gender and politics is to ask “Who has the power?” The Politics of Gender attempts to break through power structures by examining the institutional roles each play. This text takes several approaches to understanding the politics of gender, beginning with an introductory chapter focused on the major terms and theoretical approaches connected to political and gender studies.

Topics covered throughout the book include a historical discussion of the feminist movement, an analysis of the 2017 Women’s March on Washington, the nomination (and subsequent reactions) of Hillary Clinton, the impact Michelle Obama had for women of color as the first African-American First Lady, as well as the ways lesbian women’s bodies are scrutinized. In addition, this volume addresses the ways gender is litigated by examining the rights of lesbian women in Nigeria, the treatment of trans-gender people while in prison, and the connection between gun laws and intimate partner violence.

Finally, this text provides the reader with suggestions for community involvement, resources for voting, reading, film and Podcast recommendations, all combined with the stories of two women who discuss the change they created in their communities.

Identity and Internationalization in Catholic Universities

Exploring Institutional Pathways in Context

Series:

Edited by Hans de Wit, Andrés Bernasconi, Visnja Car, Fiona Hunter, Michael James and Daniela Véliz

Identity and Internationalization in Catholic Universities explores the relationship between Catholic identity, mission, and internationalization in Catholic universities of different types and located in different contexts. Internationalization is a key concern for universities working to achieve their goals in different regions of the world but without neglecting their identity. There are many universities that consider themselves related to the Roman Catholic faith and many other universities with Christian affiliations. It is well known that Catholic universities have unique missions, such as the formation of individuals inspired by a religious conviction to serve society and the church. That is why it is imperative to have empirical knowledge to help develop practical and effective policies on central themes such as internationalization, a fundamental part of many universities’ developmental strategies, while paying special attention to each university’s specific context. This book includes sixteen case studies from Latin America, the United States, the Asia Pacific, and Europe, and also includes chapters on regional perspectives on Catholic higher education as well as more specifically Jesuit higher education, the global network of La Salle universities, and internationalization in the United States, Latin America, the Asia Pacific region, and Europe.

Series:

Conrad Hughes

Educating for the Twenty-First Century is an engaging account of some of the most critical challenges for humanity, seen through the unique perspective of a school principal.

A virtuoso performance of great imaginative force, the book takes the reader through philosophical reflections, humorous anecdotes, syntheses of cutting-edge research and examples of best practice, to answer fundamental questions about education and learning in the 21st century.

Provocative, touching, accessible, but always profound, the book is a must-read for policy-makers, school and university leaders, parents and anyone passionate about education and the future of the planet.

"A significant book, which makes it required reading for educators, public policy experts, indeed every thoughtful citizen of our time."
AC Grayling
Philosopher and Master of the New College of the Humanities

"An essential book for all those who are interested in the future of their children, in other words, the very future of humanity."
Luc Ferry
Philosopher and former Minister of Education, France

Series:

Edited by Lynette Shultz and Thashika Pillay

This set of essays critically analyze global citizenship by bringing together leading ideas about citizenship and the commons in this time that both needs and resists a global perspective on issues and relations. Education plays a significant role in how we come to address these issues and this volume will contribute to ensuring that equity, global citizenship, and the common wealth provide platforms from which we might engage in transformational, collective work. The authors address the global significance of debates and struggles about belonging and abjection, solidarity and rejection, identification and othering, as well as love and hate.

Global citizenship, as a concept and a practice, is now being met with a dangerous call for insularism and a protracted ethno-nationalism based on global economic imperialism, movements for white supremacy and miscegenation, various forms of religious extremism, and identity politics, but which antithetically, also comes from the anti-globalization movement focused on building strong, sustainable communities. We see a taming of citizens that contributes to the taming of what we understand as the public sphere and the commons, the places of cultural, natural, and intellectual resources that are shared and not privately owned. The work of global citizenship education is distinguishable from the processes of a deadly globalization or destruction of the world that responds to the interlocking issues that make life on the planet precarious for human and non-humans everywhere (albeit an unequal precarity).

This book is an invitation into a conversation that explores and makes visible some of the hidden chasms of oppression and inequity in the world. It is meant to provoke both argument and activism as we work to secure common spaces that are broadly life-sustaining.

Contributors are: Ali A. Abdi, Sung Kyung Ahn, Chouaib El Bouhali, Xochilt Hernández, Carrie Karsgaard, Marlene McKay, Michael O’Sullivan, Christina Palech, Karen Pashby, Karen J. Pheasant-Neganigwane, Thashika Pillay, Ashley Rerrie, Grace J. Rwiza, Toni Samek, Lynette Shultz, Harry Smaller, Crain Soudien, Derek Tannis, and Irene Friesen Wolfstone.