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Developing Professional Memory

A Case Study of London English Teaching (1965–1975)

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Paul Tarpey

In Developing Professional Memory, the author examines narratives from ‘progressive’ and ‘radical’ London-based English teachers who began their careers between 1965 and 1975. English teaching in this period, which the author defines as a ‘cauldron’ of competing and contested currents, is often portrayed negatively in dominant discourses around the subject. The teachers’ narratives, however, provide a much more nuanced and positive story.

By recovering and documenting the collective Professional Memory of English teachers in a particular conjuncture, this volume offers a compelling practitioner account of events and developments and proves that learning from Professional Memory has transformative potential. The author argues that by critically confronting narratives, practices and existing conjunctural circumstances, current practitioners might develop greater agency in debates around their professional roles and responsibilities.

Disrupting Shameful Legacies

Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence

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Edited by Claudia Mitchell and Relebohile Moletsane

Much has been written in Canada and South Africa about sexual violence in the context of colonial legacies, particularly for Indigenous girls and young women. While both countries have attempted to deal with the past through Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and Canada has embarked upon its National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, there remains a great deal left to do. Across the two countries, history, legislation and the lived experiences of young people, and especially girls and young women point to a deeply rooted situation of marginalization. Violence on girls’ and women’s bodies also reflects violence on the land and especially issues of dispossession. What approaches and methods would make it possible for girls and young women, as knowers and actors, especially those who are the most marginalized, to influence social policy and social change in the context of sexual violence?

Taken as a whole, the chapters in Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence which come out of a transnational study on sexual violence suggest a new legacy, one that is based on methodologies that seek to disrupt colonial legacies, by privileging speaking up and speaking back through the arts and visual practice to challenge the situation of sexual violence. At the same time, the fact that so many of the authors of the various chapters are themselves Indigenous young people from either Canada or South Africa also suggests a new legacy of leadership for change.

Navigating Uncertainty

Sensemaking for Educational Leaders

Shelley Hasinoff and David Mandzuk

In Navigating Uncertainty: Sensemaking for Educational Leaders, the authors introduce a 5-step sensemaking approach for managing the kinds of challenging problems, dilemmas and crises that occur daily in educational systems. Drawing on complexity theory, social capital, and sensemaking, they make the case that educational leaders can no longer rely on traditional scientific principles or their own instincts to manage complex problems but need a new way to think about their certainties and their relationships. The authors illustrate their approach with scenarios, based on the real-life experiences of principals, superintendents and deans and provide several innovative tools to help educational leaders better understand and navigate the uncertainties they face every day in their jobs.

The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World

Resources and Challenges Related to the Professional Work of Teaching

Edited by Hannele Niemi, Auli Toom, Arto Kallioniemi and Jari Lavonen

The teacher's role is changing rapidly throughout the world. Traditional ways of working as a teacher are being challenged and teachers are faced with new areas of expertise they need to manage as educational professionals. These characteristics, challenges, and changes in the teacher’s role have been identified internationally and are both conceptual and practical. Teachers’ work now includes much more than teaching in classrooms and has expanded to designing new learning environments, collaboration and networking with others and mentoring colleagues. The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World addresses the significance of considering these issues, researching them, and emphasising the importance of actively influencing and protecting the parameters of the teacher role.

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Edited by Christopher J. Johnstone and Li Li Ji

Over the past two decades, international cooperation in higher education has become the norm in China and around the world. To exemplify these relationships, this edited volume devotes individual chapters to case studies of China-U.S. international higher education partnerships focused on 1) Collaborative graduate programs; 2) Research collaborations; 3) Student mobility; 4) Multi-institution collaborations; 5) Cultural exchanges; and 6) Branch campuses. These case studies will illuminate the strategies, challenges, and perceived benefits of cross-national collaboration. Case studies are bookended with introductory and concluding chapters that link cooperative activities to theory on diplomacy (including Western “soft diplomacy” and Chinese five principles of “peaceful coexistence” narratives); internationalization of higher education; and reflections on student and scholar mobility between Chinese and US institutions.

Communicating Effectively and Meaningfully with Diverse Families

An Action Oriented Approach for Early Childhood Educators

Katia González and Rhoda Frumkin

Communicating Effectively and Meaningfully with Diverse Families: An Action Oriented Approach for Early Childhood Educators provides readers with opportunities to critically reflect upon the impact of culturally responsive practices and intercultural communication when communicating and collaborating with families. With a special focus on inclusive practices and ways to effectively develop partnerships with families, pedagogical strategies are provided highlighting specific case studies. The impact of critical reflection is also explored in this valuable monograph.

Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice

International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching

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Edited by Leon R. de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis

In Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice: International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching, Leon de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis provide new thinking, ideas and practices concerned with philosophically, pedagogically and actively developing arts learning and teaching. Interrogating successes and challenges for creativity education locally/globally/glocally, and using illustrative cases and examples drawn from education, practice and research, they explore unique local practices, agendas, glocalised perspectives and ways arts learning develops diverse creativities in order to produce new approaches and creative ecologies through inter- and cross-disciplinary teaching practices interconnecting beyond arts domains. This book highlights innovative approaches and perspectives to activating and promoting diverse creativities as new forms of authorship and analytic approaches within arts practice and education, along with the production of adaptable, sustainable pedagogies that promote and produce diverse creativities differently. This book will help educators, artists, and researchers understand and fully utilise ways they can transform their thinking and practice and keep their learning and teaching on the move.



Contributors are: Christine Bottrell, Pamela Burnard, Peter Cook. Susan Davis, Elizabeth Dobson, Leon R. de Bruin, Tatjana Dragovic, Martin Fautley, Robyn Heckenberg, Susanne Jasilek, Fiona King, Sharon Lierse, Shari Lindblom, Megan McPherson, Sarah Jane Moore, Amy Mortimer, Alison O'Grady, Mark Selkrig, Susan Wright.

Edited by Emmanuel Jean-Francois

This volume highlights patterns with transnational applications or facets that are nationally/culturally situated. The chapters provide insights on strategies and technologies for teaching and learning that are being used across the world in various unique national/cultural contexts. The perspectives reflect innovations in teaching and learning from Africa, Asia and the Middle East, Europe, Latin America, and North America.

Topics covered include: transnational innovative teaching, innovative learning technologies, electronic portfolio and self-directed learning, on-line teaching and learning in in-service teacher education, dual language learner, outcome-based education, E-learning and simulation, democratic assessment, deliberative dialoguing as a teaching/learning strategy, and smart glasses digital strategy for learning.

#HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education

Volume 1: Hip-hop as Education, Philosophy, and Practice

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Edited by Christopher Emdin and Edmund S. Adjapong

The first volume of #HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education brings together veteran and emerging scholars, practitioners and students from a variety of fields to share their research and experiences as it relates to the use of hip-hop in educational spaces. This text extends the current literature on hip-hop and education and focuses on the philosophy of hip-hop and education, the impact that hip-hop culture has on the identity of educators, and the use of hip-hop to inform mental health practices. Through their personal and practical experiences, authors of this text will spark new and creative uses of hip-hop culture in educational spaces.

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.