Browse results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 184 items for :

  • Brill | Sense x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All Modify Search

Series:

Edited by Julie Allan, Jenny Ozga and Geri Smith

Social Capital, Professionalism and Diversity is a response to the challenges faced by teachers and other public sector professionals in attempting to manage an increasingly diverse population, whilst simultaneously being subjected to public scrutiny through measures of performance.
Social capital has increasingly been seen by policy makers and academics as a possible resource for education, allowing children and young people, and the professionals who work with them, to do better as a result of having strong networks, relationships and trust. There has, however, been little attention to how social capital might actually be used by professionals within educational contexts or to the benefits of enhanced social capital for children and young people, their families, and the professionals themselves.
The contributors to this volume provide commentaries on what is known about social capital and its use in educational contexts; the engagement of teachers and other professionals with diversity; and social capital and diversity among children, young people and families.
Social Capital, Professionalism and Diversity will appeal to teacher educators and policymakers with concerns about the challenges faced by teachers and other public sector professionals and with an interest in how social capital might enable an effective response to diversity in educational contexts. The book will be of particular interest and use to student and beginning teachers in responding to diversity as they develop their own professional identities and to practising teachers with an interest in pursuing new forms of professional renewal.

Sustainable Improvement

Building Learning Communities that Endure

Coral Mitchell and Larry Sickney

Drawing on two decades of research into the nature of schools as learning communities, the authors build on a prior model of learning communities that integrated three domains of capacity: personal, interpersonal, and organizational. In this text, the authors move the capacity-building model into practice and elaborate a theory of learning communities.
This book situates learning communities in living systems and ecological perspectives. The fundamental premise is that all of human life and human activity is part of a deep planetary ecology of which mutuality and interdependence are cornerstone properties, learning and renewal are key processes, and emergent networks are foundational structures. The text juxtaposes these conceptions with educational practices in order to understand what makes practice different in learning community schools. The authors argue that sustainable educational improvement emerges from a reciprocal process of building people who are constantly learning, building commitments to authentic learning, and building schools with a relentless focus on learning. The authors conclude that building a sustainable learning community requires a profound shift in how learning is understood, discussed, valued, enabled, and expressed. This shift, they argue, is essential as schools face the challenges and opportunities in the knowledge society.

Teacher Assemblage

International Perspectives

P. Taylor Webb

Teacher Assemblage is a groundbreaking report in the tradition of fieldwork in philosophy, using Michel Foucault’s and Gilles Deleuze’s ideas to better understand how accountability policy affected teachers. The case study examines different vectors of power and demonstrates how teachers interacted with each other, and interacted with their immediate policy environments. This unique book provides readers with grounded insights into Foucault’s and Deleuze’s ideas by paying close attention to the macro- and micro- political worlds of schools as teachers struggle with new forms of performance accountability. The book illustrates ideas of power, politics, and policy with a unique use of surrealist art to illustrate the philosophical ideas at play in the case study. The book will have a wide appeal to teachers, teacher educators, educational researchers, policy and curriculum scholars, art aficionados, and those interested in the thoughts of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze.

Teachers' Professional Development

Aims, Modules, Evaluation

Edited by Frank Achtenhagen, Fritz K. Oser and Ursula Renold

Within the central topics of the debate on teachers’ professionalism are the problems of research-based and evidence-based initial and lifelong teacher behavior. Although the statements on professional similarities of teacher actions with those of other (academic) professionals are very plausible, there remains a central task for teacher education programs: How to develop towards such expertise—which is equal to evidence convictions—effectively and efficiently. Which role do scientific research and its results play in this context? How can research results be converted into recommendations for teacher actions?
The contributions to this book focus on central problems of the conversion process: In the first part the goal dimension is treated: Maiello & Oser emphasize the relationship of central variables of teacher behaviour as identity, professional satisfaction or self-efficacy to teachers’ professional behaviour; Blömeke, Felbrich & Müller discuss the role of future teachers’ beliefs on the nature of mathematics; Stevenson uses cultural historical activity theory to work out cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education; Gruber tackles the problem of how vocational teachers can be supported to become experts by discussing especially four major possible research strategies.
The second part of this book is dedicated to possible intervention approaches by which the gap of theory and practice shall be bridged. Steiner & Steiner report on critical learning incidents which heavily influence the micro-processes which characterize teachers’ instructional measures; Winther differentiates the trait and state perspective of motivation with regard to their consequences for the learning process; Boekaerts focuses on aspects of collaborative learning; Weber sharpens her deliberations explicitly to a design experiment on the problem of initiating intercultural learning.
The third part of this book is a report of the use and the consequences of Oser’s model of teaching standards. Baer, Dörr, Fraefel, Kocher, Kiester, Larcher, Müller, Sempert & Wyss show results of a large study on the development of teacher competences run in Switzerland and Germany. The study observes the competence development of prospective teachers from the beginning of their teaching training up to the job entry phase. This book is published under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology.

Teaching Democracy

Citizenship Education as Critical Pedagogy

Series:

Emery J. Hyslop-Margison and James Thayer

As we move forward well into the 21st century most citizens around the globe seemingly accept the rudiments of a democratic citizenship. And yet in spite of this broad acceptance, a clear articulation of what democratic citizenship entails remains somewhat elusive. In this book, Hyslop-Margison and Thayer achieve two critically important objectives in response to this problem. First, they successfully articulate the threat to democracy posed by current citizenship education programs that adopt a largely instrumental framework fostering passivity and compliance by protecting the established parameters of neo-liberal social design. Second, they show a way out of this anti-democratic trap by illustrating how critical theory, with its marvelous ability to provide trenchant critiques of capitalism and turn those critiques into concrete political action, provides the ideal pedagogical approach to educate our students effectively as future democratic citizens. The authors critique the conditions of modern democratic citizenship and distinguish a robust, or thick, version of citizenship based on citizen agency and participation in the construction of social reality from contemporary models that undermine citizen engagement. They contend that it is only through critical theory and the political agency it inspires that meaningful democratic change can and must occur. Hence, the role of education in their view is not merely to prepare students for a new economic reality, but to prepare them instead to shape that reality in more progressive and socially just ways. This book eloquently argues that the citizenship mission of schools ought to teach students what is possible rather than simply objectifying them as human capital being prepared for the inevitable impact of the policies determined by others.

Rina Zazkis and Peter Liljedahl

This book presents storytelling in mathematics as a medium for creating a classroom in which mathematics is appreciated, understood, and enjoyed. The authors demonstrate how students’ mathematical activity can be engaged via storytelling. Readers are introduced to many mathematical stories of different kinds, such as stories that provide a frame or a background to mathematical problems, stories that deeply intertwine with the content, and stories that explain concepts or ideas. Moreover, the authors present a framework for creating new stories, ideas for using and enriching existing stories, as well as several techniques for storytelling that make telling more interactive and more appealing to the learner. This book is of interest for those who teach mathematics, or teach teachers to teach mathematics. It may be of interest to those who like stories or like mathematics, or those who dislike either mathematics or stories, but are ready to reconsider their position.

Tracing the threads

A curriculum study of the dialogue of ""otherness"" in the histories of public and independent schooling

Kelly J.D. Waldron

This text is a postmodern, historical analysis that seeks to trouble the distinction between the “private” and the “public” that is traditionally drawn in educational history and theory by examining the histories of public schools and independent schools around the topics of identity politics, accountability, and globalization. This work is unique in its focus on the histories of independent schoolings as being in dialogue with those of public schooling. Through a historical and theoretical examination of the dialogical space in-between the private/public divide in education around these three interrelated topics, this work seeks to troubles the private/public distinction, exploring the possibilities and futurities for curriculum work and education in the postmodern space in-between public schools and independent schools. It raises questions regarding what defines the structures of schooling in the United States as well as how contrasts between public and private spaces question traditional notions of democratic education.

Transformative Leadership and Educational Excellence

Learning Organizations in the Information Age

Series:

Edited by Myint Swe Khine and Issa M. Saleh

On records, the evolution of human development pays a considerable tribute to the relentless efforts made by generations of teacher educators set out to train academic leaders and teachers committed to the implementation of educational policies parallel to the mental edification of young students. Teacher educators, faced the challenges, overcame the obstacles, and refined the pedagogies of our educational system with many innovative approaches. As the world faces increasing uncertainties and adamant shifts of knowledge economy, it is apparent that education plays an ultimate role in creating adept and geared up citizens, to lead the way to the future. Designing and managing learning school organizations that can sustain a competitive advantage in this fast-changing environment demands transformative leaders primed and ready to the building or our intellectual capital for the future. Many books on teacher education, educational management and leadership have been written in the past, but most of them do not keep up with the fast-changing educational scene and only a few include future scenarios. This book presents the anticipated trends and demands of the new knowledge economy, and it aims to achieve its goals with the use of various tools, generative and collaborative efforts, increasing leadership capability in dynamic and complex contexts, enculturation of cutting edge knowledge for educational advancement and creation of teams that focus learning organizations.
This book brings together prominent and leading teacher educators and researchers from around the world to present their scholarship, theories and practice, case studies, state-of-the- art approaches and upshot predictions. This book embodies collective knowledge inquiry and represents professional conversations. The chapters provides information on recent trends and development in teacher education, the important role of educational management and leadership in educational transformations and promising practices for desired outcomes. The book is a critical and specialized resource that describes how transformative leadership can play an important role in achieving excellence in education. The topics covered are: Educational Leadership and Effective Teaching, Research in Transformational Leadership, and Professional Development and Social Capital Building in Schools.

Unrepentant Radical Educator

The writings of John Gerassi, edited and with interviews by Tony Monchinski

Series:

Edited by Tony Monchinski and John Gerassi

“I trust no one more than Gerassi to make me understand America,”
Jean-Paul Sartre
Unrepentant Critical Pedagogy encompasses the life, times, and activism of John ‘Tito’ Gerassi. A lifelong political animal and radical educator, Tito has lived his critical pedagogy on the barricades and front lines of the Movement; as a newsman for Time, Newsweek, and The New York Times; as a blacklisted professor exiled in Europe; as a Korean War Green Beret; as best selling author of The Great Fear in Latin America and nine other books. Major historical figures in Tito’s life include Herbert Marcuse and Michel Foucault, Che Guevara and the Black Panthers, Simone deBeauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre, and his own father, the artist and Spanish Civil War Republican General Fernando Gerassi. Unrepentant Critical Pedagogy gathers together a collection of previously unpublished and out of print essays and articles by Tito. There are also three new interviews with John Gerassi by Tony Monchinski examining Tito’s life, his time in the Movement, and his critical pedagogy.

We've Scene it All Before

Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training

Series:

Brian C. Johnson

A revolutionary tool for corporate and academic trainers, We’ve Scene It All Before harnesses the power of mainstream Hollywood film to enhance educational sessions about diversity and social justice. This resource manual offers practical guidance on how to effectively use the concept of difference as a starting point towards true inclusion.
Seasoned and novice trainers will appreciate the suggested strategies and best practices on facilitating diversity dialogues, which are coupled with a set of twenty-five definitions that introduce and raise awareness of the personal and systemic nature of difference, discrimination, and power. Workshops on human relations and workplace diversity must move beyond the superficial “celebration” of diversity to the dismantling of systems of privilege and oppression that create environments where members of the organization are disenfranchised and disempowered.
Using clips from a variety of genres of mainstream film allows the trainer to make intercultural concepts visible and offers a way for us to challenge our own values and assumptions. Participants will enjoy the presentations more as they view some of their favorite films in a whole new way; using this familiar medium creates a common basis for entering the discussions all the while giving us the permission to talk about serious and often controversial subjects.
We’ve Scene It All Before: Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training is a learning tool which will be tremendously useful in reducing resistance and increasing thoughtful cross-cultural dialogue.