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Marcelo C. Borba, Ana Paula dos Santos Malheiros and Rúbia Barcelos Amaral Zulatto

This book will address the discussion on online distance education, teacher education, and how the mathematics is transformed with the Internet, based on examples that illustrate the possibilities of different course models and on the theoretical construct humans-with-media. We will attempt to give the reader the sensation of experiencing one of the various distance courses in which we have participated, or a virtual community that does not have the structure of a course. And if the reader has not yet participated in any of these possibilities, we believe that the book may help, but not substitute, the experience of participating in a discussion list, a course, or a virtual community constituted by a specific interest.
This book is part of a collection of books called Trends in Mathematics Education, originally published in Brazil. This collection began being published in 2001 and currently has 21 titles published by more than 30 different authors. It is designed to present research to a broader audience that extends beyond academia. The books have been widely used in graduate courses, research groups and in some undergraduate classes. About 60, 000 copies of the Portuguese edition have been sold. Some titles have been translated into Spanish and English.

Ontologies for Developing Things

Making Health Care Futures Through Technology

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Casper Bruun Jensen

Ontologies for Developing Things is a work of unflagging intelligence and intellectual energy, spilling over with new ideas, surprising angles, sharp perceptions and interesting juxtapositions, and written with correspondingly attractive punch and force. Readers interested in information technologies, contemporary developments in social studies of science, and related cultural and political theory will find the book immensely engaging and endlessly useful. - Barbara Herrnstein Smith, Duke University and Brown University [author of Scandalous Knowledge: Science Truth and the Human and/or Natural Reflections: Human Cognition at the Nexus of Science and Religion]

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Edited by Ilan Gur-Ze'ev

The critique of Critical Pedagogy—in its current various trends and paths teaches me not only the shortcomings of various versions of Critical Pedagogy. No less important, it offers an invitation to a reflection on the limitations, costs, and open horizons of “critique” itself. It is an invitation to transcend “critique” as such. But what alternative do we have, and from where or with what ears might we listen to the music of the new call? What is it that awaits us outside the critical tradition that in an unproblematic manner we could use, internalize, or surrender ourselves to? Such questions reintroduce us to Utopia. They reintroduce us to the Utopia of the possibility of happiness of the kind that is neither made possible nor advocated by self-abandonment and enslavement/destruction of the otherness of the Other and the “I”. This book manifests a refusal to abandon Critical Theory’s telos; it offers no “solutions”, “victories of the oppressed”, and “emancipation”, neither does it promise “peace” and unproblematic “consensus”. On the contrary: all the eternal open, Diasporic individual can hope for is worthy Diasporic Love of Life, creativity, mature forms of togetherness, and eternal nomadism as a manifestation of co-poiesis.

Wayne Melville

The ubiquitous science department occupies an unusual position in most secondary schools. Traditionally, they have been part of the organisational structure of schools, with administrative responsibilities over room allocations, teaching assignments and the management of laboratory equipment. These are important roles, but they only tell half the story. Science teachers are more than members of an organisational structure. They are also members of a science education community which is shaped by their shared understanding of science. The science department as community also possesses a pivotal, if undervalued, role in teacher professional learning.
This book conceptualises professional learning as the engagement of teachers in a virtues-based personal reflection and/or public discourse around the episteme, techne and phronesis in the spaces ‘in-between’ the metaphors of understanding community: meanings, practice, and identity. As such, it speaks to heads of science departments, school administrators and those with an interest in leadership within schools.

Proof in Mathematics Education

Research, Learning and Teaching

David A. Reid and Christine Knipping

Research on teaching and learning proof and proving has expanded in recent decades. This reflects the growth of mathematics education research in general, but also an increased emphasis on proof in mathematics education. This development is a welcome one for those interested in the topic, but also poses a challenge, especially to teachers and new scholars. It has become more and more difficult to get an overview of the field and to identify the key concepts used in research on proof and proving.

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Edited by Jill Blackmore, Marie Brennan and Lew Zipin

This book examines changing ways that academic work is governed—from outside and inside universities—in the shifting social, cultural and political contexts of new times. Chapters trace developments in institutions, national sectors, and internationally—all applying a global scope to identify significant shifts in the broader conditions of university operation. Attention is given to governance processes across all key domains of academic work: teaching, research, leadership, management and institutional organisation. Key trends are analysed, including risk management, audit culture, league tables, techniques of accountability, and more. These investigations bring forth re-conceptions of university ‘governance’ as involving increasingly distributed and networked arrays of mechanisms, affecting academic work practices, relations, values, emotional labours and identities. Ambiguities, tensions and complexities of academic work are explored; and questions are raised as to whether prevailing managerial modes of governance can address these features of university engagement with globalising contexts.

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Edited by Kathryn Scantlebury, Jane Butler Kahle and Sonya N. Martin

Women in science education are placed in a juxtaposition of gender roles and gendered career roles. Using auto/biography and auto/ethnography, this book examines the challenges and choices of academic women in science education and how those challenges have changed, or remained consistent, since women have become a presence in science education. The book’s contributors span a temporal and spatial continuum and focus on how a variety of issues relate to the paradoxes for academic women in science education. Science is characterized as a masculine endeavor, while teaching is described as “women’s true profession”. Thus, female academics involved in science education are positioned in two paradoxes. First, as teachers they are involved in a feminized profession. However, within that profession, women faculty in science education work in a discipline viewed as a masculine enterprise. Further, these women work in educational institutions that have higher status and prestige than their sisters in elementary, middle or high schools. Second, female professors are “bearded mothers”. Women who have engaged in science education value rationality and logic and assume authority as participants in academe. The use of logic, the acceptance of authority and the assumption of power are masculine gender-stereotyped characteristics. This situation places women in a paradox, because others, including peers and students, expect them to display stereotypic female gender dispositions, such as mothering/nurturing, sacrificing their needs for others, and a commitment to the institution.
The topics include: discussing how their engagement with science impacted their career trajectories and re-direction from science to science education, the relationships of cultural and racial factors on career trajectories, and the dialectical relationship between women’s private|public lives and their agency (collective and individual) in the academy and its enactment within academic fields. The book documents the lives and careers of academic women in science education from the United States, Australia, the Caribbean, United Kingdom, and Europe.

Jim Neyland

Education is being eroded. Otherwise put, education is more and more being brought under the yoke of a mode of thought that reduces it to something mechanical, narrowly characterized by codes, predefined outcomes, protocols and rules. The cause, it is argued is the growing dominance of a new fashion in education called ‘scientific management’. Scientific management has become the new and unquestionable orthodoxy in education. As a consequence, it has become increasingly difficult to imagine, let along articulate, an alternative.
This book explores the origins and fundamental assumptions of scientific management, and suggests how the spirit of education might be rediscovered by turning instead to a more ‘ethical’, ‘socially interpersonal’, and ‘full bodied’ orientation. The approach taken avoids the difficulties usually associated with such ethically oriented treatments of education by drawing on recent findings in neurophysiology, psychology, primate and language studies.
The book is a Reader, and is designed to both supplement and invigorate undergraduate and postgraduate courses in education, and to appeal to general readers who have an interest in education.

Researching Practice

A Discourse on Qualitative Methodologies

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Nita Cherry, Robert Macklin and Rola Ajjawi

Researching practice: A discourse on qualitative methodologies explores issues, strategies and challenges associated with researching practice. The authors bring a wealth of research practice wisdom and experience to this task. The book provides critical and creative input to the discourse on qualitative research methodologies. It is divided into four sections. The first section explores the issues that frame qualitative research on practice in the 21st century. Section Two is concerned with locating the questions, practices and issues of qualitative research on practice in researchers’ journeys and presents a three themes—connections, transformations and challenges. Section Three makes accessible a range of qualitative approaches commonly used to research practice. The final section explores future considerations in qualitative research discourse.

Semiotics Education Experience

Foreword by Marcel Danesi

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Edited by Inna Semetsky

“Semiotics Education Experience” is a collection of fifteen essays edited by Inna Semetsky that explores semiotic approaches to education: semiotics of teaching, learning, and curriculum; educational theory and philosophies of Dewey, Peirce, and Deleuze; education as political semiosis; logic and mathematics; visual signs; semiotics and complexity; semiotics and ethics of the self. This is a landmark collection of cross-disciplinary chapters by international scholars that mark out the appeal and significance of a semiotic approach to education. As Marcel Danesi reminds us in the Foreword, Vygotsky construed learning theory as the science of signs. Semetsky’'-s collection should be widely read by students and scholars in education, philosophy, futures studies, cultural studies, and related disciplines. It deserves the widest dissemination.
Michael A Peters, Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Editor, Educational Philosophy & Theory and Policy Futures in Education
"With her latest collection, Inna Semetsky has once again deftly organized a series of nuanced reflections on semiotics and pedagogical issues that touch upon vital philosophical, political, communicational, visual and interdisciplinary matters of enduring relevance. "
Gary Genosko, Editor, The Semiotic Review of Books and Canada Research Chair, Lakehead University.