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Shades of Globalization in Three Early Childhood Settings

Views from India, South Africa, and Canada

Ailie Cleghorn and Larry Prochner

Shades of Globalization casts an ethnographic eye on the interplay between local and global influences on the organization and activities within three early childhood settings, each of which is located in a context of rapid social change. Stemming from a four-year study of early childhood thought and practice, each of the eight chapters touches on a different aspect of the three case study preschools, one each in India, South Africa, and an aboriginal community in Canada. The authors take a critical perspective on taken-for-granted assumptions about what constitutes the most appropriate preschool experience for children, querying for example, the meaning of school readiness within local communities.
This book will appeal to those who have an interest in the diversity of children’s lives and preschool experiences throughout the world - education and social policy makers, teacher educators, teachers, pre-service student teachers, day-care workers, parents, community leaders, governmental and non-governmental organizations and consultants, early childhood program planners and evaluators, community development workers, university lecturers, and developmental psychologists.
Ailie Cleghorn is Professor of Education at Concordia University in Montreal. She teaches in the Educational Studies Masters Program and conducts research that is grounded in her field of comparative sociology of education. Earlier publications include Issues in African Education: Sociological Perspectives, with Ali A. Abdi (Palgrave-MacMillan) and Missing the Meaning: The Development and Use of Print and Non-Print Text Materials in Diverse School Settings, with Alan Peacock (Palgrave-MacMillan).
Larry Prochner is Professor of Early Childhood Education at the University of Alberta. His research centres on the historical and comparative study of education. Recent publications include The History of Early Childhood Education in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand (University of British Columbia Press), and Early Childhood Care and Education: Theory and Practice, with Prerana Mohite (Concept Publishers).
The Afterword is written by Professor Jessica Ball, School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria, British Columbia. Professor Ball is the Principal Investigator on projects in the Early Childhood Development Intercultural Partnerships program at the University of Victoria. She is also Coordinator of First Nations Partnership Programs - a two-year diploma program in early childhood education and youth care, delivered through partnerships with Indigenous communities and post-secondary institutions in western Canada. She has worked extensively to protect cultural diversity and support development of community-based services to promote optimal child health and development.

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Edited by Wolff-Michael Roth and Pei-Ling Hsu

Non scholae sed vitae discimus, we learn for life rather than for school. In this Roman saying, the ultimate reason for school is recognized as being a preparation for life. High school science, too, is a preparation for life, the possible careers students identify, and for defining possible future Selves. In this book, the contributors take one dataset as their object of scholarship informed by discursive psychology, Bakhtin, and poststructural positions to investigate the particulars of the language used in interviews about possible careers conducted both before and after an internship in a university science laboratory. Across this collection, some contributors focus on data driven analyses in which the authors present more macro-perspectives on the use of language in science career talk, whereas others see the data using particular lenses that provide intelligible and fruitful perspectives on what and how students and interviewer talk careers in science. Other contributors propose to transform the database into different representations that allows researchers to single out and demonstrate particular dimensions of discourse. Thus, these contributions roughly fall into three categories that are treated under the sections entitled “Discourse Analyses of Career Talk,” “Discursive Lenses and Foci,” and “Innovations in Theory, Method, and Representation of Career Talk Research.”

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Yan Feng

Using autobiographical accounts acquired from her extensive career in education, the author has explored the multi-faceted influences on teacher career motivation and professional development in special and inclusive education in China.
The social realities faced by teachers in their professional lives in a city in China have been highlighted through comparison and contrast with those of their international peers. This is achieved through a comprehensive review of recent literature and an empirical study to encourage teacher voices with this regard. The study reveals opportunities and challenges in China in the process of moving towards inclusive education. In particular, it identifies the impact of teacher recruitment policies, teacher education programmes, education decentralisation, rural-urban disparities as well as socio-cultural values on teacher career motivation and their professional development. It also addresses various implications regarding ethical dilemmas overlooked in previous educational research. Meanwhile, the author proposes a discussion on Self-Determination Theory in terms of motivational change.

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Ivor F. Goodson and Christopher J. Anstead

This book presents a multi-faceted approach to a case study of a secondary school, the London Technical and Commercial High School, one of the first vocational secondary schools. The authors make a case for tracing the history of classroom and curriculum, using a variety of ways to examine the history, the institutional structures, and everyday life in the school. A major theme is the importance of viewing teachers and administrators as mediating agencies between government and the “outside world” on one hand, and students on the other, whilst retaining their own personal and career agendas. Other central themes are gender and class.

Unaccomplished Utopia

Neoconservative Dismantling of Public Higher Education in the European Union

Edited by João M. Paraskeva

Edited by Simon Beames

This book explores theory that can be used to inform how educational expeditions are conceptualised, planned, and facilitated. The contributors offer a wide range of perspectives through which expeditions for educational purposes can be considered.

Eleven accessible chapters examine the following topics:

- The British Youth Expedition: Cultural and Historical Perspectives
- Virtue Ethics and Expeditions
- Interactionism and Expeditions
- The Expedition and Rites of Passage
- Science on Expeditions
- Choices, Values, and Untidy Processes: Personal, Social, and Health Education on Educational Expeditions
- Expeditions and Liberal Arts University Education
- Understanding Heritage Travel: Story, Place, and Technology
- Expeditions for People with Disabilities
- Ethics for Expeditions
- Current Issues

Aiming to bridge theory and practice, each chapter outlines relevant literature, highlights key areas for consideration, and offers suggestions for real-world application. The book will be of interest to researchers, university students, expedition organisers, and outdoor instructors.

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Edited by Gaële Goastellec

Which inequalities characterise today higher education’systems, which one do they produce and which one do they fight? This book answers this three sides question by developing a comprehensive approach to depict and frame inequalities in and by higher education. By doing so, it provides researchers and policies makers with a tool to think and fight inequalities.
Drawing on a multilevel and international perspective, this book analyses the inequalities issue at three levels (Access to higher education, Success in higher education and Access to academic careers as an illustration of inequalities in access to the marketplace) by using complementary disciplines and approaches. Besides national histories of higher education and their path dependencies, societal specificities and their understanding of what diversity means and how it can be measured, international pressures to admit common norms, inequalities are today thought in an always more multidimensional, qualitative way. Relying on cases studies, this book takes the reader through the contemporary complexity of higher education inequalities to finally provide him with a conceptual scheme of reading the dimensions weighting on inequalities and think the potential tools to address them.

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John Smyth, Lawrence Angus, Barry Down and Peter McInerney

Activist and Socially Critical School and Community Renewal comes about at an incredibly important point in history, and it offers a genuinely new paradigm. This book attempts what few others have tried—to bring together knowledge and literature around school reform and community renewal through authentic ethnographic stories of real schools and communities. The book describes and analyzes a courageous struggle for a more socially just world, around notions of relational solidarity that speak back to ideas that continue to privilege the already advantaged. This book provides some desperately needed new storylines as a basis for school and community renewal for the most excluded groups in society. It provides a new social imagination for ‘doing school’ in contexts that stand to benefit from school and community voiced approaches.

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Edited by Tina (A.C.) Besley

Tina Besley has edited this collection which examines and critiques the ways that different countries, particularly Commonwealth and European states, assess the quality of educational research in publicly funded higher education institutions. Such assessment often ranks universities, departments and even individual academics, and plays an important role in determining the allocation of funding to support university research. Yet research is only one aspect of academic performance alongside teaching and service or administration components. The book focuses on the theoretical and practical issues that accompany the development of national and international systems of research assessment, particularly in the field of education. In our interconnected, globalised world, some of the ideas of assessment that have evolved in one country have almost inevitably travelled elsewhere especially the UK model. Consequently the book comprises an introduction, eighteen chapters that discuss the situation in ten countries, followed by a postscript. It gathers together an outstanding group of twenty-five prominent international scholars with expertise in the field of educational research and includes many with hands-on experience in the peer review process. The book is designed to appeal to a wide group of people involved as knowledge workers and knowledge managers—academics, students and policy makers - in higher education and interested in assessment and accountability mechanisms and processes.

Jürgen Maasz and Wolfgang Schlöglmann

During the last fifteen years, research on affect has been of considerable interest to the mathematics education community. Researchers with an interest in mathematics and gender had a look at aspects of affect in their research studies right from the beginning. Similarly many studies of mathematical problem solving had a growing interest in affect. The main focus of research are now student beliefs and teacher beliefs which are identified as important factors for those influencing learning and teaching.
The thirteen chapters of this book involve many aspect of research on affect like theoretical problems of defining beliefs, the complex relationship between content knowledge and affect, espoused beliefs and teaching practice, domain-specific beliefs as well as the relationship between special learning conditions and affective reactions.