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Ontologies for Developing Things

Making Health Care Futures Through Technology

Series:

Casper Bruun Jensen

Ontologies for Developing Things is a work of unflagging intelligence and intellectual energy, spilling over with new ideas, surprising angles, sharp perceptions and interesting juxtapositions, and written with correspondingly attractive punch and force. Readers interested in information technologies, contemporary developments in social studies of science, and related cultural and political theory will find the book immensely engaging and endlessly useful. - Barbara Herrnstein Smith, Duke University and Brown University [author of Scandalous Knowledge: Science Truth and the Human and/or Natural Reflections: Human Cognition at the Nexus of Science and Religion]

Beyond 'Presentism'

Re-imagining the Historical, Personal, and Social Places of Curriculum

Edited by James Nahachewsky and Ingrid Johnston

"Precisely titled, this powerful collection constitutes a “chronotope,” an erudite enactment of interstices within and among historical time, spiritual place, and political culture, a recollection focused forward to those “hybrid” generations (in Canadian classrooms) whose frontier is haunted by forts populated by not always their ancestors, inscribed in their national, regional, aboriginal identities. Homophobic, hygienic, the curriculum is always already inhabited by the language of the Other, propelling us toward “post-post” being, forested in difference, rooted in images, refracted through mirrors and windows. In constructing this crucial collage of decolonization, the contributors summon us to study with them the place we inhabit."

WILLIAM F. PINAR, Professor and Canada Research Chair,
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, University Of British Columbia, Canada

Black and Brown Waves

The Cultural Politics of Young Women of Color and Feminism

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Regina Andrea Bernard

This book discusses a critical analysis of the cultural atmosphere surrounding young women of color and the influence of this culture on their development as females in a society that embodies race, class and gender as the forefront of self-identity. Analyzing magazines and popular series novels, television shows, social and academic spaces and personal life experiences of young women of color, the book explores from historical forms of understanding and interpreting females of color and their role in youth culture to what those practices and spaces look like today.

A Carpenter's Daughter

A Working-Class Woman in Higher Education

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Renny Christopher

A Carpenter’s Daughter is the story of the difficulties and rewards of the educational system for one who was not meant to go through it. The single most reliable predictor of whether someone will earn a BA is whether at least one of their parents has one-yet, today, there are an increasing number of first-generation college students. A Carpenter’s Daughter is both a memoir of the author’s experiences growing up, going to school, and becoming an academic and a thoughtful commentary on the meaning of class in American culture. By connecting her own story with ideas from scholarly works on class and identity, Christopher shows how her individual experiences reflect common struggles that people of working-class background face when their education, profession, income, and lifestyles change. This work reminds us forcefully that "moving up" isn't necessarily good and that changing one’s class isn't as simple as going to class or even becoming the teacher of the class.—Sherry Linkon, author of Teaching Working Class The work is stellar, merging the tangled and complex webs of social mobility through education in ways that leave lots of loose ends dangling just the way it should. No pretty bows adorning carefully wrapped packages here. No straight and narrow trajectory toward a mainstream version of success. Instead, readers will be pulled along by nuanced narratives portraying the warped nature of society’s construction of success and a careful crafting of the book in its entirety as a disjointed text presenting shards of a life that can never be visible in a tidied-up tale.—Stephanie Jones, University of Georgia

Challenges Bequeathed

Taking up the challenges of Dwayne Huebner

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Edited by Patrick J. Lewis and Jennifer Tupper

In this thoughtful and provocative collection of essays, a group of scholars from varied backgrounds and interests have each taken up the educational challenges bequeathed by Dwayne Huebner in his 1996 essay, “Challenges Bequeathed”.
Huebner encouraged educators to surpass the technical foundations of education, affirm the significance of the imagination, use the world’s intellectual traditions and achievements, engage in public discourse about education, and speak out for children and youth. Each author has extended, and in some ways transcended, the discussion of these five challenges yet still draw upon the considerable contribution Dwayne Huebner has made to the field of education.
The writers in this volume grapple with the complexities of teaching and learning as always in process and as always relational; of schools as sites of creative and imaginative acts of knowing and being.
The book begins with Huebner’s 1996 essay wherein he delineates the challenges for educators, as he perceived them. Readers are invited to begin with this chapter. However, after taking in Professor Huebner’s “prescience, his ability to see, years in advance of everyone else, what is deeply at work in present times, where it is headed, and what needs to be done about it…” (Smith, this volume) we encourage readers to dip into this volume randomly rather than in sequential order. While doing so, it is important to be mindful that “these challenges do not exist in isolation of each other; rather they are inextricably linked in myriad ways. Each one of these challenges requires consideration of classroom spaces, the individuals who occupy these spaces, and how these spaces are influenced by external forces” (Tupper, this volume).
We invite you to take up a challenge.

The Collaborative Turn

Working Together in Qualitative Research

Edited by Walter S. Gershon

"Pulling back the curtain on the collaborative process, Walter Gershon’s stunning new collection highlights the complex, multi-dimensional nature of qualitative research today. The Collaborative Turn: Working Together in Qualitative Research powerfully deepens and richens ongoing discussions around collaborative inquiry so central today. Drawing together a wide range of senior and emergent scholars, as well as a span of traditional and experimental approaches, this cutting-edge text is ideal for both new and seasoned scholars alike. -- Greg Dimitriadis, Professor, University at Buffalo, SUNY Gershon's edited volume on emerging collaborative methodological practices is a welcome resource for qualitative researchers who want to make their research more transparent, improvisational, and reflexive. It juxtaposes the latest reflections of innovators like Lather, Smithies, and Clandinin with new forms of collaboration in the arts and PAR. This interdisciplinary approach provides much food for thought that will surely inspire even bolder methodological experimentation. -- Douglas Foley, Professor of Cultural Studies in Education and of Anthropology, The University of Texas-Austin This book presents invaluable (and rarely seen) reflections on collaboration, which is a central practice for qualitative researchers, across disciplines. The authors examine their relationships and experiences with other researchers and with participants, resulting in an engaging text that explores the methodological and ethical implications of generating meaning in collaborative interactions. The end result is a ‘must-read’ text that educates and enlightens about the joys and challenges of collaborative research. -- Lisa M. Given, Director, International Institute for Qualitative Methodology, University of Alberta It is evident that qualitative research must be a social activity. But like so much in social life, it is taken for granted in the everyday practice of this methodology. This book lays bare the collaboration that is often unspoken on our work. Authors in Walter Gershon’s The Collaborative Turn push at current methodological boundaries enabling us to see the social practice of qualitative research in novel, creative, and artistic ways. -- George W. Noblit, Joseph R. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education, UNC-Chapel Hill"

Competition

A Multidisciplinary Analysis

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Edited by Wade B. Worthen, A. Scott Henderson, Paul R. Rasmussen and T. Lloyd Benson

The Super Bowl. Democrats vs. Republicans. Ford vs. Chevy. Bloods vs. Crips. Public vs. private schools. Sibling rivalries. Competition permeates every aspect of our society, and we place great confidence in its ability to allocate resources efficiently, spur innovation, and build personal character. As others have argued, competition is now a paradigm—a conceptual framework that is often taken for granted but rarely challenged. In this book, experts examine competition from their own disciplinary perspectives. From economics to philosophy, biology to education, and psychology to politics, the origins and applications of this paradigm are placed in historical context, its mechanics are analyzed, and its costs and benefits are assessed.
The questions addressed in this book are important and varied. What is the historical genesis of the competition paradigm? How is competition manifest in our culture—in religion, politics, economics, sports, business, and education—and are its effects always beneficial? What can we learn about the mechanics of competition from studying nature? Are humans naturally competitive, or is it a learned behavior? How does competition affect our mental and physical well-being? Is competition the best strategy for allocating finite planetary resources to an expanding human population? The book also engages a cooperative alternative, and asks: Is there an ethical tension between competition and cooperation? Why have cooperative models been undervalued and marginalized? Can cooperation increase innovation and efficiency? This collection provides a broad, insightful, and productive examination of one of the dominant concepts of our time.

Educational Accountability

Professional Voices From the Field

Edited by Kenneth D. Gariepy, Brenda L. Spencer and J-C Couture

In an age when responses to accountability regimes in education range from hysteria to cynicism, this volume reframes accountability in narratives of collective, participatory responsibility that leave one feeling inspired and ready to act. The authors, all scholar-practitioners speaking from contexts spanning leadership, policy, literacy, indigenous education, and diversity, explore ways to navigate accountability discourses with wisdom, courage and hope.—Tara Fenwick, PhD, Head, Dept. of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
In this collection, the preoccupation of educational institutions with accountability is critically examined by writers who work in the field. They consider the impact of accountability regimes on professional practice and the learning agenda, challenge current policies and call for a rethinking of accountability. The skills and knowledge associated with this work is what we should hold schools accountable to. It is, as you see from reading these contributions, time for change.—Stephen Murgatroyd, PhD, Chief Scout, The Innovation Expedition Inc.
About the Book
From their diverse perspectives, nine educational practitioners discuss current educational accountability policies and how these affect students, educators, learning and teaching in a variety of settings, from K-12 schools to post-secondary institutions and government agencies. The authors combine theory, research and their day-to-day experiences to reflect on the challenges posed by realities such as outcomes-based curricula, high-stakes testing, standardized reporting and management by objectives. By examining current accountability initiatives and their effects in relation to core values of public education such as equity, diversity, democracy and opportunity, this book offers educators a range of insights for thinking about and doing education differently.

Bryant Griffith

The craft of teaching and learning is like playing in a symphony orchestra; every instrument has a voice and every voice is integral to the whole. The arts, history, anthropology, and philosophy and their forged discourses offer us a series of cautionary tales about the multiplicity of ways we can see and understand our world, ways we often ignore in the classroom. In the case of epistemology, and pedagogy in particular, we have hinged our understanding on a binary of opposites engaged in a dialectic dance and a type of discourse constructed to describe and explain it. The art and act of teaching in this as-if world necessitates teachers to be public intellectuals; intellectual symbols who represent something more than just subject-knowledge expertise but serve as conduits between the discourses of our world.
Established genres and discourses are exclusionary. The vast migration of people and ideas is producing a new set of presuppositions. The manner in which we decode other discourses and fuse them into meanings, both personal and shared, is the root of both teaching and learning, giving us a window into the way that each form of thought is connected, both historically and experientially. Look around you, your school is becoming the United Nations, but it’s not so united. Don’t aim for truth, aim for understanding. Today’s students construct and deconstruct in a multitude of ways on an as-needed, just-in-time basis. Since ideas of difference are often nudged but unacknowledged, we are in danger of becoming pedagogical dinosaurs, not heeding change until it is too late.
Teaching and learning are construction zones, so get out your hard hat. These constructions are possibilities that need to be discussed and negotiated, allowing us to sidestep the traps of grand narratives and a hierarchy of discplinarity and research methodology. Our possibilities need to be forged on an anvil of diversity. These are the spaces, the interstices, where our voices become innovative and our silence offers a safe harbor. Spaces to listen, collaborate, and craft cautionary tales about our lives and the possibilities for a shared future.

In the Spirit of Ubuntu

Stories of Teaching and Research

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Edited by Diane Caracciolo and Anne M. Mungai

This is an excellent and timely bookIn the Spirit of Ubuntu: Stories of Teaching and Research represents a seminal educational intervention that should re-direct the way we see and interact with learning and pedagogical projects and relationships. The book is well organized, is written in non-alienating, humanist language, and should be very useful for students, researchers, and the general public. Students in the West, who are not familiar with the philosophy of ubuntu, should be exposed to the contents of this book.”—Ali A Abdi, in Alberta Journal of Educational Research, Vol. 58, No. 4