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A Working-Class Woman in Higher Education
A Carpenter’s Daughter is the story of the difficulties and rewards of the educational system for one who was not meant to go through it. The single most reliable predictor of whether someone will earn a BA is whether at least one of their parents has one-yet, today, there are an increasing number of first-generation college students. A Carpenter’s Daughter is both a memoir of the author’s experiences growing up, going to school, and becoming an academic and a thoughtful commentary on the meaning of class in American culture. By connecting her own story with ideas from scholarly works on class and identity, Christopher shows how her individual experiences reflect common struggles that people of working-class background face when their education, profession, income, and lifestyles change. This work reminds us forcefully that "moving up" isn't necessarily good and that changing one’s class isn't as simple as going to class or even becoming the teacher of the class.—Sherry Linkon, author of Teaching Working Class The work is stellar, merging the tangled and complex webs of social mobility through education in ways that leave lots of loose ends dangling just the way it should. No pretty bows adorning carefully wrapped packages here. No straight and narrow trajectory toward a mainstream version of success. Instead, readers will be pulled along by nuanced narratives portraying the warped nature of society’s construction of success and a careful crafting of the book in its entirety as a disjointed text presenting shards of a life that can never be visible in a tidied-up tale.—Stephanie Jones, University of Georgia
Paths to Teaching the Holocaust edited by Tibbi Duboys is an important new book. It offers contributions by childhood, middle and secondary teacher educators from various regions and universities in the continental United States. The array of material is a strength of this unique book. Some contributors write about ways in which they infuse existing courses with Holocaust materials, while others focus on where and when to begin the education of their students with respect to genocide. Curriculum and instruction are examined from the perspective of existing research. Preparing oneself to teach the material and personal teaching style are presented in ways that will be helpful both to new and to experienced teachers and those interested in the kinds of questions embedded in this material.
Educators and others will see how events focused upon in the Holocaust are connected to violations of human rights and social justice committed during the period of National Socialism. Readers are reminded of the approximate nature of knowledge when it is not born of lived experience, and are invited to raise questions about the Holocaust and other genocides.
The varied nature of the chapters offers a platform for engaging in discourse likely to pique the interest of people who have limited experience with the topic, and of those whose knowledge may be rich and of long standing. Teachers often seek to bridge the gap between theory and practice, and will find the References of each writer an invaluable resource. The contents of Paths to Teaching the Holocaust will be useful to educators and others concerned with oppression, human rights and social justice.