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Edited by Alexander Lubotsky, Jos Schaeken, Jeroen Wiedenhof, Rick Derksen and Sjoerd Siebinga

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Edited by Alexander Lubotsky, Jos Schaeken, Jeroen Wiedenhof, Rick Derksen and Sjoerd Siebinga

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Johnny Cheung

The present work gives a critical survey of all the verbs that may have existed in Proto-Iranian as deduced from the attested Iranian descendants and their archaic sister language, Sanskrit. This is accompanied by an analysis of the morphology and assessment of the provenance.
The Iranian group within the Indo-European language family consists of languages that were and are still spoken in Western and Central Asia, among which Persian, Balochi, Kurdish, Pashto, Shughni and Ossetic are the best known today, and Avestan, Old and Middle Persian, Parthian, Bactrian, Khotanese, Sogdian and Choresmian in the past. This work aims to bridge the gap in knowledge that exists between Indo-Europeanists and scholars of Iranian languages with regard to each other's fields.

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Frederik Kortlandt

This volume offers a discussion of the phonological and morphological development of Old Irish and its Indo-European origins. The emphasis is on the relative chronology of sound changes and on the development of the verbal system. Special attention is devoted to the origin of absolute and relative verb forms, to the rise of the mutations, to the role of thematic and athematic inflexion types in the formation of present classes, preterits, subjunctives and futures, and to the development of deponents and passive forms. Other topics include infixed and suffixed pronouns, palatalization of consonants and labialization of vowels, and the role of Continental Celtic in the reconstruction of Proto-Celtic. The final chapter provides a detailed analysis of the Latin and other Italic data which are essential to a reconstruction of Proto-Italo-Celtic. The appendix contains a full reconstruction of the Old Irish verbal paradigms, which renders the subject more easily accessible to a wider audience. The book is of interest to Celticists, Latinists, Indo-Europeanists and other historical linguists.

Nicolaas van Wijk (1880-1941)

Slavist, linguist, philanthropist

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Jan Paul Hinrichs

Nicolaas van Wijk (1880-1941) was the founder of Slavic studies in the Netherlands and one of the greatest Slavists in general. This book describes for the first time how a scholar of the Dutch language, whose etymological dictionary of the Dutch language is still considered the best of its kind, was appointed in 1913 to the newly created Chair in Slavic languages at Leiden University and built up a tremendous reputation for himself in Eastern Europe. Van Wijk’s relations with his famous teacher, the linguist C.C. Uhlenbeck, are followed attentively, as is his postgraduate apprenticeship in Leipzig (1902-1903), where he followed August Leskien’s lectures in Slavic studies. Attention is also paid to the various aspects of Van Wijk’s enormous oeuvre covering the whole field of Slavic studies and of phonology, of which he was one of the pioneers. Van Wijk did not, however, follow the lines approved for the social conduct of a Leiden professor and was at one time suspected by the police of communist activities. His commitment to materially helping all he could from an Eastern Europe torn apart by the First World War and its aftermath was exceptional. His fascination with all things Russian is a background theme that played throughout his life and even at his death: son of a Dutch Reformed minister, the bachelor Van Wijk was buried in a grave surmounted by a Russian Orthodox cross beside his Russian foster son, who died young.
This book is of interest to Slavists, linguists and cultural historians.

Oppa Swänzsko oc Oppa Dansko

Studien zum Altostnordischen

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Edited by Harry Perridon and Arend Quak

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Wendy J. Anderson

The French administrative language of the European Union is an emerging discourse: it is only fifty years old, and has its origins in the French administrative register of the middle of the twentieth century, but it is also a unique contact situation in which translation has always played a pivotal role. Using the methodology of corpus linguistics, and a specially compiled corpus of texts, covering a range of genres, this book describes the current discourse of EU French from the perspective of phraseology and collocational patterning, and in particular in comparison with its French national counterpart. Corpus methodology and an inclusive notion of phraseology, embracing typical formulae, locutions, and patterning around keywords, reveal subtleties and patterns which otherwise remain hidden, and point to a discourse of EU French whose novel context of production has led it to be phraseologically conservative, compared with the administrative French of France.

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Dirk Boutkan and Sjoerd Siebinga

The Old Frisian Etymological Dictionary is an indispensable research tool for the study of Old Frisian, Germanic languages, and Proto-Indo- European.

With this first etymological dictionary of Old Frisian based on the lexicon of Riustring 1 manuscript, Old Frisian becomes accessible to a wide circle of scholars of Germanic and Indo-European. The latest insights of Comparative Indo-European Linguistics have been systematically incorporated. The entries are provided with a meticulous analysis of Old Frisian dialectal forms, with Proto-Frisian reconstructions, and with a wealth of Germanic and Indo- European cognates.
Due to the lack of lexicographical tools, Old Frisian cognates are rarely included in current etymological dictionaries of Germanic and Indo-European, despite the fact that Old Frisian can often provide important clues for the reconstruction. At the same time, it is difficult for the students of Old Frisian to acquire knowledge of the linguistic prehistory of this language. The Old Frisian Etymological Dictionary is an indispensable research tool for the study of Old Frisian, Germanic languages, and Proto-Indo-European.

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Edited by Erika Langbroek, Arend Quak, Annelies Roeleveld and Paula Vermeyden

Numerous Meanings

The Meaning of English Cardinals and the Legacy of Paul Grice

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Bert Bultinck

Outlandish as it may seem to the uninitiated, the meaning of English cardinal numbers has been the object of many heated and fascinating debates. Notwithstanding the numerous important objections that have been formulated in the last three decades, the (neo-)Gricean, scalar account is still the standard semantic description of numerals.
In this book, Bultinck writes the history of this implicature-driven approach and demonstrates that it suffers from methodological insecurity and postulates highly non-conventional meanings of numerals as their "literal meaning", while it confuses the level of lexical semantics with that of utterances and cannot deal with a large number of counter-examples. Relying on the results of an extensive corpus-based analysis, an alternative account of the meaning of English cardinals and the ways in which their interpretation is influenced by other linguistic elements is presented. As such, this analysis constitutes a prism that offers todays linguist an iridescent history of one of the most fascinating, if often misconstrued, topics in contemporary meaning research: the conversational implicatures.