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Series:

Edited by Merja Kytö

The chapters in this collected volume illuminate the dynamic success story of English corpus linguistics over the past few decades. The book is organised in three parts. The chapters in Part I set the scene by addressing fundamental issues such as the balance between automated and manual analyses, and the urgent call for more communication and collaboration across subjects and research areas. The studies in Part II highlight patterns in Present-day English from a cross-linguistic perspective, and identify and analyse stylistic trends in recent English. Part III is devoted to aspects of the rich variation and long-term change characteristic of early English.
Two themes cut across the chapters in the book. One of them is the impressive volume and diversity of digitised material available for English corpus linguists today and the issues that arise for researchers wishing to combine different data sources in their analyses. The other theme concerns the benefits that advances made in English corpus linguistics may offer to other disciplines.

English Corpus Linguistics: Looking back, Moving forward

Papers from the 30th International Conference on English Language Research on Computerized Corpora (ICAME 30). Lancaster, UK, 27-31 May 2009

Series:

Edited by Sebastian Hoffmann, Paul Rayson and Geoffrey Leech

This book showcases sixteen papers from the landmark 30th conference of the International Computer Archive of Modern and Medieval English (ICAME) held at Lancaster University in May 2009. The theme of the book ‘looking back, moving forward’ follows that of the conference where participants reflected on the extraordinary growth of corpus linguistics over three decades as well as looking ahead to yet further developments in the future. A separate volume, appearing as an e-publication in the VARIENG series from the University of Helsinki focuses on the methodological and historical dimensions of corpus linguistics. This volume features papers on present-day English and the recent history of English via the increasing availability of corpora covering the last hundred years or so of the language. Contributors to the volume study numerous topics and datasets including recent diachronic change, regional and new Englishes, learner corpora, Academic written English, parallel and translation corpora, corpora of popular music pop lyrics and computer-mediated communication. Overall the volume represents the state of the art in English corpus linguistics and a peek into the future directions for the field.

The Vedic -ya-presents

Passives and intransitivity in Old Indo-Aryan

Series:

Leonid Kulikov

This book is the first comprehensive study of the Vedic present formations with the suffix ya (‘ ya-presents’ for short), including both present passives with the accented suffix and non-passive - ya-presents with the accent on the root (class IV in the Indian tradition). It offers a complete survey of all ya-presents attested in the Vedic corpus. The main issue in the spotlight of this monograph is the relationship between form (accent placement, diathesis) and function (passive/non-passive) in the system of the - ya-presents – one of the most solidly attested present classes in Sanskrit. One of the aims of the present study is to corroborate the systematic correlation between accent placement and the passive/non-passive distinction: passives bear the accent on the suffix, while non-passives have the accent on the root. The book also focuses on the position of the passive within the system of voices and valency-changing categories in Old Indo-Aryan.

Etymological Dictionary of Latin

and the other Italic Languages

Series:

Michiel de Vaan

Latin is one of the major ancient Indo-European languages and one of the cornerstones of Indo-European studies. Since the last comprehensive etymological dictionary of Latin appeared in 1959, enormous progress has been made in the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European, and many etymologies have been revised. This new etymological dictionary covers the entire Latin lexicon of Indo-European origin. It consists of nearly 1900 entries, which altogether discuss about 8000 Latin lemmata. All words attested before Cicero are included, together with their first date of attestation in Latin. The dictionary also includes all the inherited words found in the other ancient Italic languages, such as Oscan, Umbrian and South Picene; thus, it also serves as an etymological dictionary of Italic.

Accent Matters

Papers on Balto-Slavic accentology

Series:

Edited by Tijmen Pronk and Rick Derksen

The accentual systems of the Baltic and Slavic languages continue to intrigue scholars of general and historical linguistics. They play an important role in the reconstruction of the linguistic ancestor of Baltic and Slavic, but also in the typological study of accentual systems. This volume contains contributions related to the accentology of the Baltic and Slavic languages by leading scholars in the field. They discuss the accentual systems that are attested in Baltic and Slavic dialects and texts, and the historical developments that led to these systems. The volume further contains contributions on similar accentual systems and developments in other languages, such as Abkhaz and the Mordvinian languages. A number of papers also deal with the role of the Balto-Slavic accents in the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European. The volume reflects the progress that has been made in the field of Baltic and Slavic accentuation during the last decades. It forms a major source for anyone interested in the latest developments and insights in the study of accentuation.

Series:

Edited by John Newman, Harald Baayen and Sally Rice

This volume consists of selected papers from the 2009 meeting of the American Association for Corpus Linguistics. The chapters cover aspects of language use (usage-based accounts of morphology/syntax of English and Tok Pisin), language learning (corpus-based learning of English, syntactic development observable in a Learner Corpus of English, “core” vocabulary items for learners of English) and language documentation (a new and innovative usage-based frequency dictionary of English, proposals to broaden the traditional understanding of a corpus in various directions, e.g., constructing a corpus of the content of Japanese manga comics). Taken together, the thirteen chapters represent a good cross-section of strands of new work in corpus linguistics, as practised by international scholars working on English and other languages.

Series:

Edited by Cornelius Hasselblatt, Peter Houtzagers and Remco van Pareren

Language contact phenomena have been researched throughout the history of the discipline, but the intensity of the research has undoubtedly risen during the last decades due to growing globalization. This peer-reviewed volume presents twelve papers from the Second Conference on Language Contact in Times of Globalization (University of Groningen, June 2009) which deal with a wide range of topics, languages and contact situations. Five of them involve a Finno-Ugric language (Saami-Komi-Russian; Finnic-Baltic; Mordvin-Turkic; Estonian-German; Saami general), two a Slavic language (Slavic-Romance; Slavic general), two Germanic-Romance contact and three situations outside Europe (The Arabic World; Central Asia; South America). Methods range from field research and corpus analysis to historical linguistics, and both synchronic and diachronic approaches are used. The authors are Rogier Blokland and Michael Rießler, Martine Bruil, Louise-Amélie Cougnon, Anissa Daoudi, Santeri Junttila, Janneke Kalsbeek, Folke Müller and Susan Schlotthauer, Johanna Nichols, Pekka Sammallahti, Peter Schrijver, Remco van Pareren, and Willem Vermeer.
Keywords / target groups: General linguistics, Contact linguistics, Finno-Ugric linguistics, Slavic linguistics.

Series:

Frederik Kortlandt

The larger part of the present volume is about Slavic historical linguistics while the second part is about more general issues and methodological aspects. The initial chapters contain a revision of the author’s Slavic Accentuation and a discussion of the Slovene evidence for the Late Proto-Slavic accentual system and of the Kiev Leaflets. These are complemented by an extensive review of Garde’s theory and an introductory article about the work of earlier authors for those who are unfamiliar with the subject. Then follows a discussion of changes in the vowel system, Bulgarian developments, final syllables in Slavic, early changes in the consonant system, and of Halle and Kiparsky’s review of Garde’s book. This results in a relative chronology of 70 stages from Proto-Indo-European to Slavic. The following chapters deal with the progressive palatalization, the accentuation of West and South Slavic languages, various aspects of the Old Slovene manuscripts, the chronology of nominal paradigms, and other issues under discussion in recent publications. The second part of the present volume contains a number of case studies exemplifying specific theoretical problems, most of them of a semantic nature. The synchronic studies deal with Russian and Japanese syntax and semantics, the diachronic studies with tonogenesis in different languages and with semantic reconstruction in Altaic and Chinese.

Series:

John Walker

Service, Satisfaction and Climate: Perspectives on Management in English Language Teaching presents the results of research carried out in New Zealand to demonstrate the ways ELT can be conceptualized in terms of service and climate. Although ESL is a major worldwide service industry employing large numbers of professionals and serving millions of clients, it is an under-researched field and one that is under-represented in the management/business literature. This omission is particularly noticeable, given that ELT has its own particular themes, problems, and issues. For instance, ELT is an educational service, yet exists within a commercial context. Its clients are from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. In many ELT contexts, the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of the service providers are different from those of the clients. Thus, the service provision has a strong cross-cultural dimension. Yet the ELT sector is largely missing from the educational and the management literature. This book seeks to fill the gap through discussion of ELT as a service, issues surrounding ELT teachers as service providers, the work of ELT managers, client expectations and perceptions of ELT service, comparison of staff estimates and client ratings of service quality, and considerations of service milieu and climate in ELT centers.

Time, Tense and Aspect in Early Vedic Grammar

Exploring Inflectional Semantics in the Rigveda

Series:

Eystein Dahl

This book takes a fresh look at the relationship between aspect, tense and mood in Early Vedic, the language of the Rigveda. Although numerous studies have examined the functional range of individual verbal categories in this language, this work is the first attempt to approach this problem from an overall, systemic perspective. With insights from formal semantics and linguistic typology, the author demonstrates that aspect represents a grammatically relevant semantic dimension on a par with tense in the Early Vedic verbal system, thereby indicating that the language has preserved an aspectual opposition similar to the one found in Homeric Greek. Apart from these general findings, the book provides a theoretical framework designed for exploring inflectional semantics in dead languages.