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Urszula Clark

Debates about the nature of literacy and literacy practices have been conducted extensively in the last fifteen years or so. The fact that both previous and current British governments have effectively suppressed any real debate makes the publication of this book both timely and important. Here, Urszula Clark stresses the underlying ideological character of such debates and shows that they have deep historical roots. She also makes the point that issues regarding the relationship between language and identity, especially national identity, become sharply focused at times of crisis in that identity. By undertaking a comparison with other major English-speaking countries, most notably Australia, New Zealand and the USA, Clark shows how these times of crisis reverberate around the globe.

Adverbial Modification

Selected papers from the Fifth Colloquium on Romance Linguistics, Groningen, 10-12 September 1998

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Edited by Reineke Bok-Bennema, Bob de Jonge, Brigitte Kampers-Manhe and Arie L. Molendijk

This volume contains a selection of papers presented at the Cinquième Colloque de Linguistique Romane/Fifth Colloquium on Romance Linguistics, which was held at Groningen University in September 1998. The theme of the colloquium was ‘adverbial modification in Romance languages'.
Therefore, adverbial modification is the common denominator of the works in this volume. However, and interestingly enough, the viewpoints taken by the Various authors differ considerably: some of the works deal with traditional adverbs (Ocampo, Kampers-Manhe, Bok-Bennema, Molendijk), others with elements such as mood (de Jonge, Quer) or negation (de Swart). Degree modification is discussed by Cover and Doetjes. Modifying clauses are the topic of Le Draoulec's article and modifying nominals play a central role in Schroten's contribution. A special type of modification is the pragmatic one, which is represented by Montolio's article. Also, various theoretical approaches are represented in this volume, such as the generative approach (e.g. Kampers-Manhe, Bok-Bennema), formal semantics (Molendijk, De Swart) and functional-cognitive linguistics (Ocampo, De Jonge), among other ones. Moreover, the languages dealt with are Catalan, French, Rumanian and Spanish.
Thus, this volume offers a wide perspective on adverbial modification in Romance languages both from a theoretical point of view as from the point of view of the different languages involved.

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Edited by Virginia Motapanyane

Volume 58 of the North Holland Linguistic Series, edited by Virginia Motapanyane, provides an up-to-date overview of studies in Romanian syntax. Bringing together linguists working within the field of generative grammar, the volume's comparative approach demonstrates the relevance of Romanian data to grammatical theory. The editor's introductory chapter provides a valuable summary of developments in Romanian syntax and is the ideal preparation for the studies contained in this volume, both for Romance specialists and for those less familiar with the topic.

A Thesaurus of Old English, Volume 1

Introduction and Thesaurus. Second Revised Edition

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Edited by Jane Roberts, Christian J. Kay and Lynne Grundy

A Thesaurus of Old English is conceptually arranged, and presents the vocabulary of Anglo-Saxon England within ordered categories. This allows the user to approach the materials of the Thesaurus by subject rather than through an alphabetic index as is the case for many thesauri. The provision of brief indications of meaning at all levels of this scheme allows word-senses to follow on from ideas explained, so that this thesaurus incorporates information about word meaning and could be described as an inside-out dictionary, with meanings first and then words.

In addition to providing hitherto unavailable information for linguists, historians of language, authors, students of English, and textual scholars, A Thesaurus of Old English is a rich resource for investigating social and cultural history, showing the development of concepts through the words that refer to them.

The Thesaurus can be consulted online at the University of Glasgow website.

A Thesaurus of Old English, Volume 2

Index. Second Revised Edition

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Edited by Jane Roberts, Christian J. Kay and Lynne Grundy

A Thesaurus of Old English is conceptually arranged, and presents the vocabulary of Anglo-Saxon England within ordered categories. This allows the user to approach the materials of the Thesaurus by subject rather than through an alphabetic index as is the case for many thesauri. The provision of brief indications of meaning at all levels of this scheme allows word-senses to follow on from ideas explained, so that this thesaurus incorporates information about word meaning and could be described as an inside-out dictionary, with meanings first and then words.

In addition to providing hitherto unavailable information for linguists, historians of language, authors, students of English, and textual scholars, A Thesaurus of Old English is a rich resource for investigating social and cultural history, showing the development of concepts through the words that refer to them.

The Thesaurus can be consulted online at the University of Glasgow website.

Corpora Galore

Analyses and Techniques in Describing English

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Edited by John M. Kirk

Wh-Clauses in English

Aspects of Theory and Description

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Joe Trotta

This study provides the first description-oriented, theoretically-unaligned account of wh-clauses in Modern English. The author employs a data-based approach to examine aspects of both generative and non-generative work as regards their relative strengths and weaknesses.
Wh-clauses in English: Aspects of Theory and Description is a unique combination of statistical findings and qualitative analysis. It is not only underpinned by a systematic investigation of the Brown University corpus but also includes attested material from other sources such as the British National Corpus, the CobuildDirect corpus as well as material gleaned from the internet.
The qualitative and quantitative analyses are combined to approach a wide range of theoretical and descriptive issues, such as wh-movement, landing-sites for moved wh-XPs, vacuous movement, island constraints, among others. Not insignificantly, many questions of indeterminacy are addressed, such as the interface of conjunctions and relative words, the problems of demarcation between interrogatives and free relatives as well as structural ambiguities between interrogatives and exclamatives.

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Edited by Dicky Gilbers, John Nerbonne and Jos Schaeken

The present volume includes papers that were presented at the conference Languages in Contact at the University of Groningen (25-26 November 1999). The conference was held to celebrate the University of St. Petersburg’s award of an honorary doctorate to Tjeerd de Graaf of Groningen. In general, the issues discussed in the articles involve pidgins and creoles, minorities and their languages, Diaspora situations, Sprachbund phenomena, extralinguistic correlates of variety in contact situations, problems of endangered languages and the typology of these languages. Special attention is paid to contact phenomena between languages of the Russian Empire / USSR / Russian Federation, their survival and the influence of Russian.

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Edited by Robert W. Thomson

This Lawcode is the first Armenian legal text to cover secular as well as ecclesiastical matters. Although the Armenians had been concerned with canon law since the fifth century, secular law was not codified until Greater Armenia was under Muslim domination. Mxit'ar Gosh began his work in 1184 in an attempt to provide Armenians with a comprehensive code based on traditional practice. He did not use the Greek and Syrian lawcodes that were being translated into Armenian during his lifetime. Mxit'ar's code formed the basis for all later Armenian lawcodes, both that of Smbat in Cilican Armenia and those adaptations used in the diaspora farther afield.
This lawcode has never before been translated into any western language. The commentary identifies Mxit'ar's sources, and the introduction places his work in its historical and literary contexts. This book will be of particular interest to historians of the Near East in medieval times, to scholars of Armenian literature, and all those interested in Eastern Christian culture.