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From Animators’ Perspectives
Volume Editor: Daisy Yan Du
This volume on Chinese animation and socialism is the first in English that introduces the insider viewpoints of socialist animators at the Shanghai Animation Film Studio in China. Although a few monographs have been published in English on Chinese animation, they are from the perspective of scholars rather than of the animators who personally worked on the films, as discussed in this volume. Featuring hidden histories and names behind the scenes, precious photos, and commentary on rarely seen animated films, this book is a timely and useful reference book for researchers, students, animators, and fans interested in Chinese and even world animation.

This book originated from the Animators’ Roundtable Forum (April 2017 at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology), organized by the Association for Chinese Animation Studies.
Studies on the History of Central Asian Religions in Honor of Devin DeWeese
The volume's unifying theme, inspired by the scholarly legacy of Professor Devin DeWeese, and indeed the subject of all the contributions, is the history of religion among the Muslim peoples of Inner and Central Asia, grounded in ignored or hitherto unknown indigenous sources. Individually, and as a whole, the articles pay tribute to DeWeese’s pathbreaking contributions to the disciplines of history and religious studies by exploring new approaches and new sources to build on this legacy. The volume pays particular attention to DeWeese's point d'appui: the centrality of Sufism in the region's religious, social, and literary history.
The volume’s focus is thus twofold: to bring a new set of rich, largely unused materials into the scholarly domain among specialists on Central Asia, and to challenge historians of Islam to recognize that understanding the religious history of Central Asia, and Sufism in particular, is crucial in evaluating the Islamic world as a whole.

Contributors:
Peter B. Golden, Jürgen Paul, Ron Sela, Nicholas Walmsley, Jo-Ann Gross, Daniel Beben, Jeff Eden, Jamal Elias, Michael Kemper, Paolo Sartori, Eren Tasar, Stéphane A. Dudoignon, Allen J. Frank
Read The Taiji Government and you will discover a bold and original revisionist interpretation of the formation of the Qing imperial constitution. Contrary to conventional wisdom, which portrays the Qing empire as a Chinese bureaucratic state that colonized Inner Asia, this book contends quite the reverse. It reveals the Qing as a Warrior State, a Manchu-Mongolian aristocratic union and a Buddhist caesaropapist monarchy. In painstaking detail, brushstroke by brushstroke, the author urges you to picture how the Mongolian aristocratic government, the Inner Asian military-oriented numerical divisional system, the technique of conquest rule, and the Mongolian doctrine of a universal Buddhist empire together created the last of the Inner Asian empires that conquered and ruled what is now China.
This book brings together the disciplines of history and psychology. It is the first study to apply attachment theory to self-narratives of the past, namely examples of life-writing (letters and proto-autobiographies) from medieval England, written in broad religious contexts. It examines whether God could appear as an adequate attachment figure in times of high mortality and often inadequate childrearing practices, and whether the emphasis on God’s proximity to believers benefited their psychological reorganisation. The main method of enquiry is discourse analysis based on the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) coding.
Author: Hughson T. Ong
This book introduces sociolinguistic criticism to New Testament studies. The individual essays cover a wide range of sociolinguistic theories (multilingualism, speech communities and individuals, language and social domains, diglossia, digraphia, codeswitching, language maintenance and shift, communication accommodation theory, social identity theory, linguistic politeness theory, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, register analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, etc.) that treat topics and issues pertaining to the language and sociolinguistic contexts of the New Testament, social memory, orality and literacy, and the oral traditions of the Gospels, and various texts and genres in the New Testament.
Studies in Book History, the Classical Tradition, and Humanism in Honor of Craig Kallendorf
Habent sua fata libelli honors the work of Craig Kallendorf, offering studies in several fields in which he chiefly distinguished himself: the history of the book and reading, the classical tradition and reception studies, Renaissance humanism, and Virgilian scholarship with a special focus on the creative transformation of the Aeneid through the centuries. The volume is rounded out by an appreciation of Craig Kallendorf, including a review of his scholarship and its significance.

In addition to the topics mentioned above, the volume’s twenty-five contributions by scholars in America and Europe are of relevance to those working in the fields of classical philology, Neo-Latin, political philosophy, poetry and poetics, printing and print culture, Romance languages, art history, translation studies, and Renaissance and early modern Europe generally.

Contributors include: Alessandro Barchiesi, Susanna Braund, Hélène Casanova-Robin, Jean-Louis Charlet, Federica Ciccolella, Ingrid De Smet, Margaret Ezell, Edoardo Fumagalli, Julia Gaisser, Lucia Gualdo Rosa, James Hankins, Andrew Laird, Marc Laureys, John Monfasani, Timothy Moore, Colette Nativel, Marianne Pade, Lisa Pon, Wayne Rebhorn, Alden Smith, Sarah Spence, Fabio Stok, Richard Thomas, and Marino Zorzi.
Sources of Warfare Leadership in Ancient Egypt. Ancient Warfare Series Volume 4
The study of the ancient Egyptian military and warfare now encompasses the background court society in which the various eulogies drawn up for the glorification of the kings were composed. This study proceeds from a previous analysis of the leadership characteristics of the military pharaohs to their underlying war records to the literary compositions that the pharaohs had drawn up for their glorification. A study of these court-inspired accounts fits within the overarching new perspectives of royally directed and inspired ancient Egyptian literature. The historical background covers the New Kingdom pharaohs Kamose, Thutmose III, Ramesses II and III, with Merenptah, plus Pianchy. The concentration is primarily upon the narrative structures employed in each of these king’s monumental inscriptions.
Coenraad Jacob Temminck and the Emergence of Systematics (1800–1850) is the first study to examine in detail the life and work of Coenraad Jacob Temminck (1778–1858), the Dutch naturalist who was the first director of ’s Rijks Museum van Natuurlijke Historie (National Museum of Natural History) in Leiden, The Netherlands. This study situates Temminck’s activities in the context of European natural history during the early to the mid-nineteenth century. Three issues which defined the era are discussed in more detail: the growing European colonial territories, the rise of scientific meritocracy, and the emergence of systematics as a discipline. Temminck’s biography elucidates how and why systematics developed, and why its status within the natural sciences has been a matter of discussion for more than a century.
This book provides a new perspective on book history by exploring communities created by the production and consumption of printed material. Essays by leading scholars explore the connections between writers, printers, booksellers and readers and examine changes and continuities across the period 1500 to 1800. As well as investigating the networks behind the production and dissemination of printed material, this collection examines the ways in which readers consumed, used and shared their printed texts.
By focusing on the materiality of early modern texts, contributors to this volume offer new interpretations of the history of reading, the book trade, and the book as an object in early modern Europe.