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The Religious Worldviews Reflected in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Symposium of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature, 28–30 May, 2013

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Edited by Ruth A. Clements, Menahem Kister and Michael Segal

The Dead Sea Scrolls offer a window onto the rich theological landscape of Judaism in the Second Temple period. Through careful textual analysis, the authors of these twelve studies explore such topics as dualism and determinism, esoteric knowledge, eschatology and covenant, the nature of heaven and / or the divine, moral agency, and more; as well as connections between concepts expressed in the Qumran corpus and in later Jewish and Christian literature. The religious worldviews reflected in the Scrolls constitute part of the ideological environment of Second Temple Judaism; the analysis of these texts is essential for the reconstruction of that milieu. Taken together, these studies indicate the breadth and depth of theological reflection in the Second Temple period.

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Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirty-third year of published proceedings, contains four papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2016-17. Paper topics include: a liar’s paradox in Parmenides’ Poem centered on the role of the goddess; Aristotelian logic as rooted in natural things, not mental entities, in Posterior Analytics; authorial freedom in Aristotle’s Poetics rooted in the ‘likely and necessary’; Callicles’ attack on philosophy as taking away one’s substance and Socrates’ concurrence to preserve its pursuit of truth and the good in Plato’s Gorgias. The comments do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others.

Contributors are Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore, Rose Cherubin, Shane Ewegen, Joseph M. Forte, Owen Goldin, Edward C. Halper, Jean-Marc Narbonne and Yale Weiss.

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Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

This volume, the thirty-third year of published proceedings, contains four papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2016-17. Paper topics include: a liar’s paradox in Parmenides’ Poem centered on the role of the goddess; Aristotelian logic as rooted in natural things, not mental entities, in Posterior Analytics; authorial freedom in Aristotle’s Poetics rooted in the ‘likely and necessary’; Callicles’ attack on philosophy as taking away one’s substance and Socrates’ concurrence to preserve its pursuit of truth and the good in Plato’s Gorgias. The comments do their work in challenging some of these claims and supporting others.

Contributors are Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore, Rose Cherubin, Shane Ewegen, Joseph M. Forte, Owen Goldin, Edward C. Halper, Jean-Marc Narbonne and Yale Weiss.

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Matthew S. Goldstone

In The Dangerous Duty of Rebuke Matthew Goldstone explores the ways in which religious leaders within early Jewish and Christian communities conceived of the obligation to rebuke their fellows based upon the biblical verse: “Rebuke your fellow but do not incur sin” (Leviticus 19:17). Analyzing texts from the Bible through the Talmud and late Midrashim as well as early Christian monastic writings, he exposes a shift from asking how to rebuke in the Second Temple and early Christian period, to whether one can rebuke in early rabbinic texts, to whether one should rebuke in later rabbinic and monastic sources. Mapping these observations onto shifting sociological concerns, this work offers a new perspective on the nature of interpersonal responsibility in antiquity.

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Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-second year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2015-16. Paper topics include: Stoic constitution of bodies through blending as causal; the failure to distinguish divine and human eros in the Phaedrus; perception in the Republic’s tripartite soul, recognizing autonomy in the non-rational parts; Stoic identity, peculiar qualities and the role of the pneuma, and an alternative read of Plato’s politics that pairs his philosophical theory and historical events, the Republic as reconstruction of Socrates’ defense in the Apology and the Laws as a reconstruction of Plato’s idea of political reform in the Seventh Letter.

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Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-second year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2015-16. Paper topics include: Stoic constitution of bodies through blending as causal; the failure to distinguish divine and human eros in the Phaedrus; perception in the Republic’s tripartite soul, recognizing autonomy in the non-rational parts; Stoic identity, peculiar qualities and the role of the pneuma, and an alternative read of Plato’s politics that pairs his philosophical theory and historical events, the Republic as reconstruction of Socrates’ defense in the Apology and the Laws as a reconstruction of Plato’s idea of political reform in the Seventh Letter.

Where Dreams May Come (2 vol. set)

Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World

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Gil Renberg

Where Dreams May Come was the winner of the 2018 Charles J . Goodwin Award of Merit, awarded by the Society for Classical Studies.

In this book, Gil H. Renberg examines the ancient religious phenomenon of “incubation", the ritual of sleeping at a divinity’s sanctuary in order to obtain a prophetic or therapeutic dream. Most prominently associated with the Panhellenic healing god Asklepios, incubation was also practiced at the cult sites of numerous other divinities throughout the Greek world, but it is first known from ancient Near Eastern sources and was established in Pharaonic Egypt by the time of the Macedonian conquest; later, Christian worship came to include similar practices. Renberg’s exhaustive study represents the first attempt to collect and analyze the evidence for incubation from Sumerian to Byzantine and Merovingian times, thus making an important contribution to religious history.

This set consists of two books.

Talmudic Transgressions

Engaging the Work of Daniel Boyarin

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Edited by Charlotte Fonrobert, Ishay Rosen-Zvi, Aharon Shemesh and Moulie Vidas

Talmudic Transgressions is a collection of essays on rabbinic literature and related fields in response to the boundary-pushing scholarship of Daniel Boyarin. This work is an attempt to transgress boundaries in various ways, since boundaries differentiate social identities, literary genres, legal practices, or diasporas and homelands. These essays locate the transgressive not outside the classical traditions but in these traditions themselves, having learned from Boyarin that it is often within the tradition and in its terms that we can find challenges to accepted notions of knowledge, text, and ethnic or gender identity. The sections of this volume attempt to mirror this diverse set of topics.


Contributors include Julia Watts Belser, Jonathan Boyarin, Shamma Boyarin, Virginia Burrus, Sergey Dolgopolski, Charlotte E. Fonrobert, Simon Goldhill, Erich S. Gruen, Galit Hasan-Rokem, Christine Hayes, Adi Ophir, James Redfield, Elchanan Reiner, Ishay Rosen-Zvi, Lena Salaymeh, Zvi Septimus, Aharon Shemesh, Dina Stein, Eliyahu Stern, Moulie Vidas, Barry Scott Wimpfheimer, Elliot R. Wolfson, Azzan Yadin-Israel, Israel Yuval, and Froma Zeitlin.

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Edited by William V. Harris

The history of healthcare in the classical world suffers from notable neglect in one crucial area. While scholars have intensively studied both the rationalistic medicine that is conveyed in the canonical texts and also the ‘temple medicine’ of Asclepius and other gods, they have largely neglected to study popular medicine in a systematic fashion. This volume, which for the most part is the fruit of a conference held at Columbia University in 2014, aims to help correct this imbalance. Using the full range of available evidence - archaeological, epigraphical and papyrological, as well as the literary texts - the international cast of contributors hopes to show what real people in Antiquity actually did when they tried to avert illness or cure it.

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Edited by William Wians and Gary Gurtler

This volume, the thirty-first year of published proceedings, contains five papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2014-15. Paper topics include: the volatility of ἔρως in the Symposium as not self-directed to good or bad; the ‘analytical’ reading of the tripartite soul as autonomous sub-agents and whether it resembles neuroscience; holiness in the Euthyphro as misconstrued by the difficulty translating finite passives and passive participles in English; evil in Proclus as an indefinite nature redefined by privation, subcontrary and parypostasis, contrary to Plotinus’ identification of matter and evil; Plato’s literary reworking of the encounter of Odysseus with the Cyclops in the Sophist and of his struggle with the suitors in the Statesman.