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In À l’ombre des grandes puissances de Mésopotamie. Une histoire du Sūhu à l’époque néo-assyrienne, Philippe Clancier studies the Sūhu region of the Euphrates river, on the border of Assyria and Babylonia. He reconstructs its geography by presenting the fauna and flora, and by identifying sites and the layout of traffic routes. After going back to the 2nd millennium BC to explain the origin of its main dynasty, he highlights the partition of Sūhu into two main kingdoms before its reunification in the 8th century BC and its later conquest by Assyria. Thanks to an interdisciplinary approach that combines written sources, archaeological data and travellers’ accounts, Philippe Clancier offers for the first time a history of this region in the neo-Assyrian period.
In L'art du siège néo-assyrien, Fabrice De Backer investigates the people, materials, tools, machines, and tactics employed during the first millenium B.C. by the Neo-Assyrians to take and defend fortified cities. The story of besieged people, along with their customs, treatment by the winners, and consequences of the conquest are also discussed.

Based on the combination of archaeology, iconography, philology and ethnographical comparisons, the analysis of the particular assets of siege-engines or architectural features are developed, along with the best means employed at that time to overcome them. De Backer proposes more than a simple census of all the means known so far, he also develops and enhances our knowledge of siege-warfare in a pragmatic and efficient manner.
Représentations et célébrations d'Auguste à Constantin (31 av. J.-C.-337 ap. J.-C.)
Author: Hadrien Bru
This book focuses on the role of the emperor and the image of the Roman Empire as a whole during the time period from Augustus to Constantine. It analyses this image by taking into account the epigraphic, literary, numismatic and archaeological sources from Phoenicia to Osrhoene and from Commagene to Arabia. While discussing Graeco-Roman cities and rural settlements among desert areas, it addresses celebrations as well as the organization and promotion of the imperial cult in the Near East. This includes the imperial cult’s forms of expression of symbolic, political, and various other social or religious functions. This approach, therefore, explores the real and imaginary relationships that existed between the Roman Empire and the populations of the Syrian provinces.
Author: Jan Dušek
This book deals with the manuscripts from the Wadi Daliyeh (Samaria Papyri) written in Aramaic in the fourth century B.C.E. in the city of Samaria, in the last decades of the Persian period. The book contains a complete edition of the Wadi Daliyeh manuscripts, their new historical interpretation, and an analysis of their legal aspects. The historical interpretation sheds new light on the history of Samaria and its institutions in the Persian period, as well as on the history of the Persian province of Judaea. This book is particulary useful for historians of Palestine in the Second Temple period, for biblical scholars, and for scholars dealing with Near Eastern legal texts.
Contribution à une histoire et une anthropologie du rêve en Anatolie ancienne
Author: Alice Mouton
This volume deals with the ancient Anatolian textual evidence on dreams. The book starts with a study of the evidence from different perspectives. The second and third parts are of special interest for anthropologists and historians of religion, as they focus on the various shapes and functions allotted to dreams in Hittite Anatolia. The fourth part assembles the Hittite cuneiform texts in which a dream is either described or mentioned. The texts are given in transliteration and translation, with relevant bibliography.
This study makes a significant contribution to our understanding of dream conception in the ancient Near East by providing a systematic edition and analysis of the Hittite testimonies.
The relations between Carthago and Greece are the subject of this new book by Véronique Krings, author of the Brill handbook La Civilisation Phénicienne et Punique (Handbook of Oriental Studies I, 20 (1995)). It covers the period from the expedition of Pentathlos of Cnidos to Sicily until the battle of Himera (580-480 B.C.).
In many (Greek) sources material can be found on the subject, e.g.: Herodotus, Diodorus of Sicily, Pausanias, Justinus and Orosius. All these sources are carefully examined, giving due attention to their specific contexts. The texts are consequently confronted with the archaeological evidence available and modern opinions are discussed from an historiographical point of view
This volume gives not only new insights into the nature of the relations between Carthago and Greece, but also throws a new light on the Carthaginian presence in the western Mediterranean.
This collective volume is devoted to the Phoenician and the Punic civilization studied for its own purpose but also for its relationship with contemporaneous cultures of the ancient Mediterranean.
The first part discusses the various sources relating to the Phoenician and Punic world; a second part attempts to sum up the different facets of its material and cultural surrounding. The third part expounds the present state of our knowledge of the Phoenicians and the Punics in each of the large geographical areas where they have emerged.
The work thus assembles clearly, conveniently and as completely as possible the basic facts that will allow specialists of fellow disciplines to initiate themselves, and well-informed researchers to complete or check easily their information. This volume includes a bibliography, illustrations, maps and indexes.
(Textes et Mémoires, 18)
Author: Wolski
Author: Fahd
Le récit épique et didactique des Travaux de Ninurta, du Déluge et de la Nouvelle Création. 1. Introduction, texte composite, traduction
Author: J. van Dijk