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Philosophy in Latin America is a special series of philosophical books that pertain to all areas of value inquiry in the region. Its goal is to introduce the core content of Latin American philosophy to English-speaking readers.
Series Editors: and
The book series Religion in the Americas is devoted to the study of religious influences within and between South, Central, Latin, and North America. A particular focus lies on the interaction of different forms of Christianity with the societies, politics, religions, economies, symbols, materialities, and cultures of the variety of peoples in the Americas. The complex theologies, philosophies, and contributions of their expressions and experiences throughout the Americas have profoundly influenced not only Catholicism but many other religions - in the Americas and all across the globe. In addition to Christianity, the editors welcome submissions on Indigenous, New Age, Africa- and migrant-derived religions. Religion in the Americas brings to the forefront new works that deal with these issues, particularly from the perspectives of religious studies, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, psychology, and Latin American Studies.

The series has published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
This book addresses the negotiation of categorizations in colonial societies in Spanish America from a new vantage point: fiscality. In early modern empires (poll) taxes were a significant factor to organize and perpetuate social inequalities. By this, fiscal categorizations had very concrete effects on the daily life of the categorized, on their assets and on their labor force. They intersected with social categorizations such as gender, profession, age and what many authors have termed race or ethnicity, but which is denominated here, more accurately with a term from the sources, calidad. They were imposed by legislation from above and contested via petitions from below, the latter being a type of source scarcely analyzed until now.
Volume Editors: and
Christian-Muslim Relations, a Bibliographical History19 (CMR 19), covering Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean in the period 1800-1914, is a further volume in a general history of relations between the two faiths from the 7th century to the early 20th century. It comprises a series of introductory essays and the main body of detailed entries. These treat all the works, surviving or lost, that have been recorded. They provide biographical details of the authors, descriptions and assessments of the works themselves, and complete accounts of manuscripts, editions, translations and studies. The result of collaboration between numerous new and leading scholars, CMR 19, along with the other volumes in this series, is intended as a basic tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Section Editors: Ines Aščerić-Todd, Clinton Bennett, Luis F. Bernabé Pons, Jaco Beyers, Emanuele Colombo, Lejla Demiri, Martha Frederiks, David D. Grafton, Stanisław Grodź, Alan Guenther, Vincenzo Lavenia, Arely Medina, Diego Melo Carrasco, Alain Messaoudi, Gordon Nickel, Claire Norton, Reza Pourjavady, Douglas Pratt, Charles Ramsey, Peter Riddell, Umar Ryad, Cornelia Soldat, Charles Tieszen, Carsten Walbiner, Catherina Wenzel
Series Editors: and
Critical Latin America explores the historical and contemporary currents, connections, and conflicts of Latin Americans’ ideas and identities. The editors are particularly interested in the intersections of identities—gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class—and such public and private fora as politics, culture, art, religion, and family. Interdisciplinary in nature, the series also examines how forces such as migration, revolution, economic development, production of knowledge (particularly scientific and medical), social movements, education, and the environment shape the ideas, identities, and lived experiences of Latin Americans.

The editors invite proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions. Aiming to strike a balance between studies of the colonial and national eras, the series will consider manuscripts that deal with any period from the first European encounters in the Americas through the twenty-first century. The series embraces history on all scales, from the micro to the macro. The editors are as interested in relationships between people of African, Asian, European, and indigenous heritage in rural and urban communities as they are in the geopolitical relationships between nations and the transnational relationships of groups that defy borders.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

The editors of Critical Latin America prefer that contributors adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style.

*A paperback edition of select titles in the series, for individual purchase only, will be released approximately 12 months after publication of the hardcover edition.

Celebración, resistencia furtiva y transformación cultural
En Cofradías Afrohispánicas: celebración, resistencia furtiva y transformación cultural, Manuel Apodaca Valdez ofrece un estudio de 42 cofradías de afrodescendientes del periodo colonial y seis cofradías contemporáneas aún vivas en cuatro zonas geográficas: España, Perú, México y República Dominicana.

Esta investigación histórica y comparativa de corte trasatlántico analiza datos recogidos en archivos históricos e investigación de campo. El estudio muestra evidencias de las condiciones sociales, políticas, culturales y espirituales de las personas de origen africano que se integraron en cofradías durante el periodo colonial. Su legado trazó un camino caracterizado por la hibridación y la transformación, cimentando las bases para las cofradías afrohispánicas del presente, un fenómeno que el autor interpreta como resistencia furtiva y celebración de la identidad cultural.

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In Cofradías Afrohispánicas [Afro-Hispanic Confraternities], Manuel Apodaca Valdez offers an account of forty-two confraternities of African descendants of the colonial period, along with six contemporary confraternities still alive in four geographical regions: Spain, Perú, México, and the Dominican Republic.

This historical and comparative trans-Atlantic study analyzes data gathered from archives and field work research. The work shows evidence of the social, political, cultural, and spiritual conditions of the peoples of African descent integrated in confraternities during the colonial time. Their legacy traced a path historically marked by hybridism and transformation laying the foundation for contemporary Afro-confraternities, a phenomenon interpreted by the author as furtive resistance and celebration of cultural identity.
This study presents a contrasting hypothesis concerning the genesis and development of Islam in Mexico than the one generally held across academic spheres and current historiography. It demonstrates that Colonial and Early Independent Mexico and Islam may have as well known about the existence of each other. However, within the chronological framework in which the Viceroyalty of Nueva España lived and developed there were social hindrance, geopolitical imperatives and theological impediments and cosmovisions – in both sides of the Atlantic – that created the quasi– perfect circumstances for the Islamic tradition and Mexico not to really meet. This book provides new angles of study on the theme, and with it, new historiographical approaches.
The Continuing Relevance of Latin American Critical Thought
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This book received the Libertador Prize for Critical Thought (2018), demonstrating a renewal of interest in Dependency Theory. That conception initially included distinct forms of Marxism, liberalism, and developmentalism that should be differentiated, despite sharing the same name. The later retreat of that approach contrasts with the growing present-day relevance of its postulates; Latin America bears the effects of dependency even more acutely than in the past, making it imperative to understand the logic of its peripheral subordination. Dependency Theory in its original form is insufficient for explaining contemporary reality; it must be updated to interpret the current modalities of dependent capitalism. This book offers analytical clues to that reinvention.
The Bourbon monarchs who ascended the Spanish throne in 1700 attempted to reform the colonial system they had inherited, and, in particular, to make administration more efficient and cost-effective. This book analyses one aspect of the Bourbon reforms, which was the efforts to transform frontier missions, to make the missions more cost-effective, and to accelerate the integration of indigenous peoples in northern Mexico to European cultural norms. In some instances, the Crown had funded missions for more than a century, but with minimal results. The book attempts to show how the mission programs changed, and what the consequences – especially demographic – were for the indigenous peoples brought to live on the missions.