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Since 1982, the Culture and History of the Ancient Near East series has become a primary forum for studying all aspects of ancient Near Eastern civilizations. Across a chronological and geographical swath, it covers religion, history, language, literature, thought, science, art and visual culture, and architecture. The series demands high scholarly standards and innovative approaches. It publishes monographs and collected volumes in English, French, and German.

The series published an average of six volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The monographs series Cuneiform Monographs has rightly been called the 'flagship' of STYX Publications, now owned by Brill. It presents the reader with a number of outstanding monographs, each of an outstanding quality and tasteful presentation. Brill is happy to call your attention to the following important titles from the recent past which may have escaped your notice earlier, and certainly deserve a wide audience. For a full list, please contact Brill's Customer Service Department at cs@brill.com, or visit our website at brill.com.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Within the main series Culture and History of the Ancient Near East (CHANE), the subseries Ancient Warfare aims at focussing on aspects of military history in the Ancient Near East, including Egypt and related areas that in the past were connected to Near Eastern political institutions and regions. The chronological framework includes Early Bronze Age societies up through the Iron Ages, with the possibility — in a cross-disciplinary and diachronic perspective — to enlarge the analyses of military institutions in the later periods of Egypt and the Near East. The impact of Hellenism and Rome in the east, including periods when western armies had to face well structured and organized forces of Parthians and Sassanians as well as Central Asia military organizations, is also within the purview of this subseries.

The subseries Ancient Warfare will include publications of specific monographic studies on military aspects as well as the proceedings of thematic conferences on the subject. Recent trends in the history of ancient warfare, books and miscellaneous collections of papers should be taken into consideration, and the outcomes, suggestions and guidelines of the “New Military History.”

This new line of research aims to go beyond the traditional limits and themes of studies on ancient warfare (particularly linked to the study and analysis of tactical and strategic aspects of warfare and technical detailed investigation of the function and mechanism of weapons). In particular, “New Military History” points out the necessity of cross-disciplinary studies that take into consideration economy, politics, culture and society.

The subseries Ancient Warfare is also devoted to specific technical studies of use and functions of weapons and military machines as well as to military practices on the battlefield, and to studies of military architecture, usually neglected or only partially considered in scholarship. However, attention should be pointed to the sociological and political implication of war as a cause of change and transformation of human society. Diachronic studies that develop the repercussions of war on economy and the organization of ancient cities and territories across time in the area of Egypt and the Near East are particularly welcome.
The electronic version of the Culture and History of the Ancient Near East series.

Culture and History of the Ancient Near East has become a primary forum for studying all aspects of ancient Near Eastern civilizations. Across a chronological and geographical swath, it covers religion, history, language, literature, thought, science, art and visual culture, and architecture. The series demands high scholarly standards and innovative approaches. It publishes monographs and collected volumes in English, French, and German.
Through new readings and interpretation of Cypriot inscriptions – written in Cypriot-syllabic Greek, Eteocypriot, Phoenician, and alphabetic Greek – Kypriōn Politeia, the Political and Administrative Systems of the Classical Cypriot City-Kingdoms is the first book which reconstructs in detail the political and administrative systems of the Classical city-kingdoms of Cyprus. The book investigates the bodies of government beyond the Cypriot kings and the roles played by magistrates and officials in local governments, it analyses accounts of the headquarters of the main administrative and economic activities – such as palace archives, and tax collection hubs –, and demonstrates that these systems were similar in all the city-kingdoms.
A Network Analytical Approach to a Bilingual Community. Volume 1.
Author:
This study tackles pertinent questions about daily life and socio-economic interactions in the late Ptolemaic town of Pathyris (186-88 BCE) through an empirically grounded network analysis of 428 Greek and Demotic documents associated with 21 archives from the site.

The author moves beyond traditional boundaries of Egyptological and Papyrological research by means of an innovative and interdisciplinary methodology – zigzagging back and forth between archaeological field survey, close reading of ancient texts, formal methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and explanatory theories and concepts borrowed from economics and other social sciences.

This is volume 1 of a two-volume set.
A Network Analytical Approach to a Bilingual Community. Volume 2.
Author:
This study tackles pertinent questions about daily life and socio-economic interactions in the late Ptolemaic town of Pathyris (186-88 BCE) through an empirically grounded network analysis of 428 Greek and Demotic documents associated with 21 archives from the site.

The author moves beyond traditional boundaries of Egyptological and Papyrological research by means of an innovative and interdisciplinary methodology – zigzagging back and forth between archaeological field survey, close reading of ancient texts, formal methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and explanatory theories and concepts borrowed from economics and other social sciences.

This is volume 2 of a two-volume set.
Healing Goddesses and the Legitimization of Professional asûs in the Mesopotamian Medical Marketplace
This volume exposes one of the world’s oldest medical marketplaces and the emergence of medical professionalization within it. Through an unprecedented analysis of the Mesopotamian healing goddesses as well as asûs, a diverse group of “healers”, Irene Sibbing-Plantholt demonstrates that from the Middle Babylonian period onwards, the goddess Gula was employed as a divine legitimization model for scholarly, professional asûs. With this work, Sibbing-Plantholt provides a unique insight in processes of medical competition and legitimization in ancient Mesopotamia, which speak to similar processes in other societies.