Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 172 items for :

  • Authors, Texts, Literature x
  • Just Published x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
The monographs series Cuneiform Monographs has rightly been called the 'flagship' of STYX Publications, now owned by Brill. It presents the reader with a number of outstanding monographs, each of an outstanding quality and tasteful presentation. Brill is happy to call your attention to the following important titles from the recent past which may have escaped your notice earlier, and certainly deserve a wide audience. For a full list, please contact Brill's Customer Service Department at cs@brill.com, or visit our website at brill.com.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Collection of texts in English translation, illuminating the religions of the world for students.
Editor:
Publishes ancient Babylonian letters from museums and collections throughout the world, with translations and scholarly commentary.
Volume 24 of the Israel Oriental Studies Annual includes eight articles. The Ancient Near Eastern section consists of five articles. Four deal with Hittite and Anatolian subjects (Burgin, Gilan, Cohen and Hawkins); one discusses the “Laws of Hazor” text fragment and its relationship to other cuneiform law collections (Darabi). The Semitic section includes three articles. The first is the second instalment of Etymogical Investigations on Jibbali/Śḥerέt Anthroponyms (Castagna and Al-'amri). The second article is a discussion of the relationship between Ethiopian Semitic languages and ancient Egyptian (Cerqueglini). Sealing the Semitic section and volume 24 is a study of spoken Ashkenazic Hebrew among Hassidic communities (Yampolskaya et al.).
Restauration, sacrifice et naissance prophétique dans la Sīra d’Ibn Ishạq
Author:
This book aims to demonstrate that the accounts that feature Muḥammad’s grandfather in Ibn Isḥāq’s Sīra are the product of narrative engineering. Through a narrative sequence in which ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib is the hero, several intriguing episodes follow one another in a causal manner and lead to the birth of a future prophet. Articulated with a historical anthropology, the narrative analysis reveals that the Sīra is the heir to the royal literature of the ancient Near East. Using motifs and themes from the culture of the Fertile Crescent, the Sīra makes ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib a royal figure in the service of legitimising the Abbasid dynasty, heir par excellence to Ishmael and restorer of the Abrahamic covenant.

Cet ouvrage entend démontrer que les récits qui mettent en scène le grand-père de Muḥammad dans la Sīra d’Ibn Isḥāq sont le produit d’une ingénierie narrative. À travers une séquence narrative dont ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib est le héros, plusieurs épisodes intriguants s’enchainent d’une manière causale et aboutissent à la naissance d’un futur prophète. Articulée à une anthropologie historique, l’analyse narrative révèle que la Sīra est l’héritière de la littérature royale du Proche-Orient ancien. À partir de motifs et de thématiques issus de la culture du croissant fertile, la Sīra fait de ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib une figure royale au service de la légitimation de la dynastie abbasside, héritier par excellence d’Ismaël et restaurateur de l’alliance abrahamique.
Author:
In Nation and Empire as Two Trends of Political Organization in the Iron Age Levant MEI Hualong offers an analysis of national and imperial ideologies--two political principles that influenced the establishment, consolidation and expansion of trans-local/trans-tribal polities in the Iron Age Levant. By examining key terminologies, historical accounts and literary sources, MEI argues that the elites of ancient nations may attempt to reshape their political and cultural identity in imperial terms (vice versa, but to a lesser extent). The conceptual transformation from the one to the other is closely related to the political entity’s consciousness and understanding of limits and boundaries: political and cultural, real and imagined.
Volume Editor:
This book spins around the convening idea of variability to offer fourteen new views into the Pyramid and Coffin Texts and related materials that overarch archaeology, philology, linguistics, writing studies, religious studies and social history by applying innovative approaches such as agency, politeness, material philology and object-based studies, and under a strong empirical focus. In this book, you will find from a previously unpublished coffin or a reinterpretation of the so-called ‘Letters to the Dead’ to graffiti’s interaction with monumental inscriptions, ‘subatomic’ studies in the spellings of the Osiris’ name or the puzzles of text transmission, among other novel topics.
This book reveals how violent pasts were constructed by ancient Mediterranean societies, the ideologies they served, and the socio-political processes and institutions they facilitated. Combining case studies from Anatolia, Egypt, Greece, Israel/Judah, and Rome, it moves beyond essentialist dichotomies such as “victors” and “vanquished” to offer a new paradigm for studying representations of past violence across diverse media, from funerary texts to literary works, chronicles, monumental reliefs, and other material artefacts such as ruins. It thus paves the way for a new comparative approach to the study of collective violence in the ancient world.
The First Complete Publication of the Text of the Greek Minor Prophets Scroll (8ḤevXIIgr), Preceded by a Study of the Greek Translations and Recensions of the Bible Conducted in the First Century CE under the Influence of the Palestinian Rabbinate
Translator:
This ground-breaking study in Septuagint translation technique is, after sixty years, finally available to an English-speaking audience. Barthélemy provides us with a first look at the fragments of the Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from the Cave of Horror and embarks on a careful examination of this scroll’s place in the history of Septuagint translation and revision. He poses questions and answers that have yet to be fully explored. Devanciers d’Aquila is described as “epoch-making” (Robert Kraft—Gnomon), “a stimulating contribution” (Sidney Jellicoe—Journal of the American Oriental Society), and “a monograph of singular importance” (Geza Vermes–Journal of Semitic Studies).
Volume Editors: and
The Song of Songs is the only book of the Bible to privilege the voice of a woman, and its poetry of love and eroticism also bears witness to violence. How do the contemporary #MeToo movement and other movements of protest and accountability renew questions about women, gender, sex, and the problematic of the public at the heart of this ancient poetry? This edited volume seeks to reinvigorate feminist scholarship on the Song by exploring diverse contexts of reading, from Akkadian love lyrics, to Hildegard of Bingen, to Marc Chagall.