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The civilisation of India, marked by an ancient and vast cultural heritage with a strong character of its own, is among the oldest continuous and most seminal of the world, influencing as it does the thought and action of the population of nearly the whole of Asia. The vitality of its tradition still continues to fascinate Man all over the world today.
Brill's Indological Library is concerned with the languages, history and native cultures of South Asia. Subjects include Hinduism, Indian Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism; political, social and economic history; philosophy; literature; languages; native science; performing art; law; the State; foreign relations, and manifestations of the Indian radiance or presence abroad; et cetera.
The series includes monographs on substantial subjects, thematic collections of articles, text editions, and translations. The volumes are in English.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.

This series is indexed in Scopus.
Brill’s Studies in South and Southwest Asian Languages (BSSAL) is a peer-reviewed series that provides a venue for high-quality descriptive and theoretical studies on the languages of South and Southwest Asia, both monograph-length studies as well as multi-authored volumes dealing with particular topics. The series also welcomes contributions on educational aspects of South and Southwest Asian languages, including language textbooks and other educational materials.

In the political sense, South Asia encompasses the seven independent states of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, but linguistically and culturally also includes some adjacent areas to the east and north, notably Tibet. Southwest Asia is understood here as comprising the Iranian language-speaking territory to the west of South Asia, i.e., the states of Afghanistan and Iran and the geocultural transnational region Kurdistan, consisting of parts of Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria.

The languages – both ancient and modern – of South and Southwest Asia have played a central role in linguistics from the field’s very beginnings as a modern scientific endeavor, and continue to occupy a central position in discussions in many linguistic sub-disciplines, including the following, among others:

• phonology
• morphology
• syntax
• historical linguistics
• sociolinguistics
• typology and language universals
• multilingualism
• areal studies
• heritage languages
• writing systems

The series seeks high-quality, state-of-the-art contributions on all aspects of the languages of this linguistically diverse and fascinating area.

Brill's Tibetan Studies Library has established itself as one of the foremost academic book series in the fast-growing field of Tibetan Studies. Featuring both monographs and rigorously edited collected volumes, it covers all aspects of Tibetan culture well into modernity, doing justice to the full spectrum of humanities disciplines.
In the course of its existence, strictly peer-reviewed Brill's Tibetan Studies Library has brought together a considerable number of works by renowned scholars from all parts of the world, thus offering a wide overview of more than a decade of first-rate scholarship on a culture with an ever-increasing international appeal.

This series is indexed in Scopus.
Editor:
The Groningen Oriental Studies publishes scholarly works in the field of classical Indology since 1986. The series is published under the auspices of the J. Gonda Foundation (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences). It focuses on philological works, critical editions of texts in Sanskrit and New Indo-Aryan languages, as well as text-related studies. From 2013 onwards the series will be merged with the Gonda Indological Studies (GIS), which focuses on monographs and collected volumes on topics such as the (cultural) history, material culture, literature, languages, philosophy and religions of South Asia.
In the Supplement to the Groningen Oriental Studies (GOSS) appears the critical edition and study of the Skandapurāṇa.

Brill’s Handbook of Oriental Studies, Section Two: South Asia series primarily comprises graduate-plus scholarly reference tools for the study of the history, cultures, religions, and languages of South Asia. The series welcomes handbooks on either specific topics or periods from c. 1750 BCE to approximately the year 1900. Reference handbooks on the modern period are taken into consideration as well, provided (treatment of the) subject will make a title first reference on the topic for years to come; both single author and edited volumes will be taken into consideration. Typical examples are encyclopaedic works, (history) survey works, atlases, (biographical) dictionaries, (reference) grammars, deemed indispensable for the study of the field. In principle the volumes in the series are in English.

This series is indexed in Scopus.
This series of monographs, edited volumes, and translations promotes the interdisciplinary study of South Asian Islamicate societies by exploring previously neglected archives and voices and showcasing new methodologies. Informed by popular literature, the visual and verbal arts, socio-religious treatises on reform, canonical works of history and culture, and the creative, ideological, literary, and mercantile networks, this series furthers the study of religious, regional, and linguistic reciprocities.
Modern South Asia and the Global Circulation of Ideas
This collection brings together case studies that cover a wide spectrum: from Hindu, Buddhist, Jaina traditions through reformist ventures such as the Brahmos, to issues in modern Islam and Judaism.
The first part of the book explores idioms of self-fashioning in global platforms and religious congresses. The second part explicates the nature of movements of such ideas. Cumulatively, they offer fresh and invaluable insights into their histories in modern South Asia against the backdrop of, and in relation to, wider transcultural global flows.
Contributors: Soumen Mukherjee, Toshio Akai, Jeffery D. Long, Arpita Mitra, Philip Goldberg, Ankur Barua, Oyndrila Sarkar, Madhuparna Roychowdhury, Navras J. Aafreedi, and Faridah Zaman.