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V. F. Minorsky and C. J. Edmonds Correspondence (1928-1965)
This volume is an annotated correspondence, of nearly forty years, between two prominent Orientalists. The letters cover a range of topics related to the Zagros Mountains, its peoples, their history, culture, and languages. They also offer a glimpse into the personal lives and careers of the two scholars, give valuable insights on the development of the field of Kurdish Studies, and to an extent outline the contours of what the two referred to as Zagrology.
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With China’s economic boom, continuous political stability, and increasing influence, it is time to ask if the trajectories of the Chinese Revolution--its troubled interaction with the world market, its national independence movements, its pursuit of egalitarianism, communism, and socialism, and its post-socialist reform—could be understood as a meaningful and consistent historical experience. It is important now to see how China’s past efforts have contributed or obstructed its progress since the Qing empire was thrust into the international system of nation-states in the late 19th century. This series aims to place the study of China in the contexts of the international system of nation-states, global capitalist and market expansion, imperialist rivalry, the Cold War, and recent waves of economic globalization. It welcomes analytical attempts to frame intellectual, historical, and cultural analysis conducive to dialectical relations between these categories. Ideas will not be studied in the abstract but be set in motion and intertwined with praxis through analysis of historical contexts and enriched by close analysis of aesthetic texts, such as literature, narratives, and phenomena of everyday life.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Stephanie Carta and Masja Horn.

Please see our Guidelines for a Book Proposal. All submissions are subject to a double-anonymous peer review process prior to publication.
Part of a formidable publishing industry, cheap yet eye-catching graphic narratives consistently charmed early modern Japanese readers for around two hundred years. These booklets were called kusazōshi (“grass books”).
Graphic Narratives from Early Modern Japan is the first English-language publication of its kind. It enables anyone new to kusazōshi to gain comprehensive knowledge of the field. For the specialist, our edited volume marks a turning point in scholarship, uncovering fresh research avenues.
While exploring the powerful effects of the visual-verbal imagination, this collection opens up bold new vistas on the act of reading and advances provocations around comics and manga.
Contributors are: Jaqueline Berndt, Joseph Bills, Michael Emmerich, Adam L. Kern, Fumiko Kobayashi, Frederick Feilden, Laura Moretti, Matsubara Noriko, Satō Satoru, Satō Yukiko, Satoko Shimazaki, Takagi Gen, Tanahashi Masahiro, Ellis Tinios, Tsuda Mayumi and, Glynne Walley.
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This collection of writings traces the evolution and revolution of Chinese modern education in the early twentieth century initiated by Cai Yuanpei (1868-1940), the first Minister of Education of the Republic of China, President of Peking University (1916-1927) and the founder of Academia Sinica.

This volume illustrates Cai Yuanpei’s educational thoughts, one of which is known as “freedom of thought and academic inclusiveness”(思想自由,兼容並包), through his own words from his political, social, and academic endeavors. Cai navigated the landscape of Chinese education at the time, bridging the gap between tradition and revolution, East and West, and setting the cornerstone of the Chinese modern education system. His innovative ideology remains significant in the context of Chinese education reforms in the 21st century.
This is the first book-length study of the roles played by the Manchu language at the center of the Qing empire at the height of its power in the eighteenth century.
It presents a revisionist account of Manchu not as a language in decline, but as extensively and consciously used language in a variety of areas.
It treats the use, discussion, regulation, and philological study of Manchu at the court of an emperor who cared deeply for the maintenance and history of the language of his dynasty.
Rethinking Networks of Exchange and Material Culture
Silk Road studies has often treated material artifacts and manuscripts separately. This interdisciplinary volume expands the scope of transcultural transmission, questions what constituted a “book,” and explores networks of circulation shared by material artifacts and manuscripts. Featuring new research in English by international scholars in Buddhist studies, art history, and literary studies, the essays in Beyond the Silk and Book Roads chart new and exciting directions in Silk Road studies.
Contributors are: Ge Jiyong, George A. Keyworth, Ding Li, Ryan Richard Overbey, Hao Chunwen, Wu Shaowei, Liu Yi, Lan Wu, Sha Wutian, Michelle C. Wang, and Stephen Roddy.