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Encyclopedia of Theology and Religion
Religion Past and Present (RPP) is a complete, updated English translation of the 4th edition of the definitive encyclopedia of religion worldwide, the peerless Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart (RGG). Including the latest developments in research, Religion Past and Present encompasses a vast range of subjects connected with religion. This great resource, now at last available in English, continues the tradition of deep knowledge and authority relied upon by generations of scholars in religious, theological, and biblical studies. Religion Past and Present indisputably belongs to the small class of essential reference works.

Key Features
• RGG has been a standard reference work since the publication of the first edition in 1908
• Strongly international, cross-cultural and ecumenical, written by over 3,000 authors from 88 countries
• Covers an unparalleled breadth of subject matter in theological and biblical studies
• Up-to-date research and bibliographies make it an indispensable resource for all levels of users
• Interdisciplinary articles cover a wide range of topics from history, archaeology, liturgy, law, bible, music, visual arts, politics, social sciences, natural sciences, ethics, and philosophy
• The 4th edition of RGG, the basis of the RPP translation, includes hundreds of new entries on Eastern religions and other religious subjects. The editors of RPP have added a number of articles and revised others for a global English-speaking readership
• Short definitions and cross-references enable quick and easy searching
• Over 15,000 entries and 8 million words
• 13 volumes and an index

The series was completed in 2013.
Series Editors: and
The series aims to publish the latest research at the intersection of Digital Humanities and Biblical Studies, Ancient Judaism, and Early Christianity in order to demonstrate the transformation of research, teaching, cognition and the economy of knowledge in digital culture. In particular, DBS investigates and evaluates the practices and methodologies of Digital Humanities as applied to texts, inscriptions, archaeological data, and scholarship related to these fields.

The primary areas of focus are the digital edition of ancient manuscripts, the evolution of research between big data and close reading, the visualization of data, and the epistemological transformation of ancient studies through digital culture. DBS will encompass collected essays as well as monographs, with a particular emphasis on cutting-edge research. Several ancient languages are in the scope of the series, including ancient Greek, Hebrew, Latin, Arabic, Coptic, and Syriac.
A Textual Reconstruction of Chapters 1–7
The first half of the book of Daniel contains world-famous stories like the Writing on the Wall. These stories have mostly been transmitted in Aramaic, not Hebrew, as has the influential apocalypse of Daniel 7. This Aramaic corpus shows clear signs of multiple authorship. Which different textual layers can we tease apart, and what do they tell us about the changing function of the Danielic material during the Second Temple Period? This monograph compares the Masoretic Text of Daniel to ancient manuscripts and translations preserving textual variants. By highlighting tensions in the reconstructed archetype underlying all these texts, it then probes the tales’ prehistory even further, showing how Daniel underwent many transformations to yield the book we know today.
This series was taken over from Deo Publishing in September 2018
The volumes in this series provide assistance to scholars and students in Biblical Studies. Typical titles are introductions to the New and Old Testaments, reading the Bible as literature, anthologies, bibliographies and works on method.
This study argues that the establishment of the millennium binding of Satan and the vindication of the saints in Revelation 20:1–6 are cohesively linked with Jesus’s victorious battle in Revelation 19:11–21. The major implication of this analysis views both these events as consequent effects of Christ’s victory at the eschatological battle. Applying systemic functional linguistics and discourse analysis of cohesion, this study advances critical scholarship on the Book of Revelation by offering the first fully sustained answer to this frequently debated question regarding Satan’s binding from a modern linguistic approach.
Volume Editors: and
Premodern architecture and built environments were fluid spaces whose configurations and meanings were constantly adapting and changing. The production of transitory meaning transpired whenever a body or object moved through these dynamic spaces. Whether spanning the short duration of a procession or the centuries of a building’s longue durée, a body or object in motion created in-the-moment narratives that unfolded through time and space. The authors in this volume forge new approaches to architectural studies by focusing on the interaction between monuments, artworks, and their viewers at different points in space and time.

Contributors are Christopher A. Born, Elizabeth Carson Pastan, Nicole Corrigan, Gillian B. Elliott, Barbara Franzé, Anne Heath, Philip Jacks, Divya Kumar-Dumas, Brigitte Kurmann-Schwarz, Ashley J. Laverock, Susan Leibacher Ward, Elodie Leschot, Meghan Mattsson McGinnis, Michael Sizer, Kelly Thor, and Laura J. Whatley.