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This series, which began publication with M. Hengel's Die Zeloten in 1976, includes monographs and collections of essays on a range of topics, typically focussing on points of controversy or mutual influence between Judaism and Christianity in the first centuries of our era. Recent titles published in the series have included important studies of Josephus, of the Jewish background of Paul's writings, and of the historical Jesus in his Jewish context.
Studies in the Syriac Versions of the Bible and their Cultural Contexts
Scholarly studies on the Syriac translations of the Old and New testament.

The series published three volumes over the last 5 years.
The Peshitta, the Syriac translation of the Old Testament, was made on the basis of the Hebrew text during the second century CE, whilst some books outside the Hebrew canon may have been translated at a later stage on the basis of a Greek text. It is an important source for our knowledge of the text of the Old Testament. Its language is also of great interest to linguists. Moreover, as Bible of the Syriac Churches it is used in sermons, commentaries, poetry, prayers, and hymns. Many terms specific to the spirituality of the Syriac Churches have their origins in this ancient and reliable version. The present edition, published by the Peshitta Institute of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam on behalf of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament, is the first scholarly edition of this text. It presents the evidence of all known ancient manuscripts and gives full introductions to the individual books.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years (update 2017).
This multi-volume series fills a significant gap in biblical studies by providing a literary commentary on the Greek text of the Septuagint. The Septuagint is widely recognized as one of the most important interpretations of the Old Testament and one of the most important sources for New Testament study. Whereas there has been much attention devoted to the two testaments, with numerous commentary series having been written, the Septuagint has been virtually neglected as a set of primary texts used by Jewish and Christian religious communities in the Greco-Roman world.

Each commentary follows a format well known in Greek-text commentaries. This includes an introduction to the textual history of the biblical book and consideration of other historical, theological and related topics. The commentary proper includes the Greek text based upon a single Greek manuscript, a translation of this text, and a section-by-section commentary. This commentary series includes commentaries on the individual books of the Septuagint in their own right, without extended reference to the Hebrew text.

The series has published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Studies in Philo of Alexandria publishes monographs and collections of essays focusing on the study of Philo of Alexandria and his cultural environment. The series aims to present a wide spectrum of studies covering the religious and philosophical background as well as the main streams of thought of his time.

The series welcomes contributions on philosophical, historical, exegetical, and theological subjects as well as studies on literary issues.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
Streams of Tradition in Mark, Matthew, and Luke
This Synoptikon brings together the Synoptic Gospels, freshly translated, comparing them with materials selected from previous volumes in this series. The aim is to serve commentators who engage the Gospels critically and with the awareness that a consideration of their Judaic environments is crucial. Placing the texts within that setting evokes particular streams of tradition that interacted so as to produce the Gospels. These are set out in distinctive typefaces, so that readers may assess the depth of the Synoptic tradition as well as the breadth of its development.
Editor-in-Chief:
Vetus Testamentum Supplements Online, Supplement 2022 contains new volumes.

The Supplements to Vetus Testamentum series covers the whole range of Old Testament study, including Septuaginta studies, Ugaritic research relevant to the study of the Old Testament, Hebrew studies, studies in ancient Israelite history and society, and studies in the history of the discipline. There are both monographs and collective volumes, the latter including the Proceedings of the Triennial International Congresses of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.
Anchoring Cultural Formation in the First Millennium BCE
Canonisation is fundamental to the sustainability of cultures. This volume is meant as a (theoretical) exploration of the process, taking Eurasian societies from roughly the first millennium BCE (Babylonian, Assyrian, Persian, Greek, Egyptian, Jewish and Roman) as case studies. It focuses on canonisation as a form of cultural formation, asking why and how canonisation works in this particular way and explaining the importance of the first millennium BCE for these question and vice versa. As a result of this focus, notions like anchoring, cultural memory, embedding and innovation play an important role throughout the book.
The Brill Septuagint Monograph Series seeks to be a premier venue for publication of scholarly work on the Septuagint, as the full corpus of Greek texts that came to be identified with the Old Testament in Greek. The monograph series is a supplement to the well-established Brill Septuagint Commentary Series and therefore has the primary purpose of offering a venue for monographs and edited collections of essays that promote primarily, but not exclusively, the aims of the Brill Septuagint Commentaries. This aim includes providing the opportunity to address issues and questions that may arise from the study of the Septuagint with specific focus upon the Greek text as received, used, and interpreted within early Judaism and Christianity.