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Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum designed in the 1960s as a structured set of handbooks on ‘matters Jewish’ illuminating the origins of Christianity, has evolved into a series of monographs and collective works on the history and literature of Jews and Christians under Roman rule. Combining expertise in Jewish, Christian, and Roman literature and history, the series aims at covering Qumranic, Graeco-Jewish, early Christian, and rabbinic sources. The classic ‘historical introduction’ published in the two volumes of The Jewish People in the First Century (1974-76) will be complemented by a number of volumes debating historiographical axioms and methods and presenting a selection of sources and a ‘joint history’ of Jews and Christians in the first and second centuries CE. Apart from the volumes planned by the editors, other publication proposals will be taken into consideration. With all these updates in methodology, the series proudly continues the pioneering work set in motion by its founders half a century ago.

Board of Editors: Shaye Cohen (Harvard University), Matthijs den Dulk (Radboud University Nijmegen), David Goodblatt (University of California at San Diego), Christine Hayes (Yale University), Richard Kalmin (Jewish Theological Seminary of America), Karl-Wilhelm Niebuhr (University of Jena), Pieter van der Horst (Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences), Huub van de Sandt (University of Tilburg), James VanderKam (University of Notre Dame). General Editors: Joshua Schwartz (Bar-Ilan University) and Peter Tomson (University of Leuven).

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
(Arbeiten zur Geschichte des antiken Judentums und des Urchristentums)
Ancient Judaism & Early Christianity began in 1976, as Arbeiten zur Geschichte des antiken Judentums und des Urchristentums with the publication of M. Hengel's Die Zeloten. The series, which includes monographs and collections of essays, covers a range of topics, typically focusing on areas of mutual influence or points of controversy between Judaism and Christianity in the first centuries CE. Recent titles published in the series have included important studies of Josephus, of the Jewish background of Paul's writings, and of the historical Jesus within his Jewish context.

The series published an average of three volumes per year over the last 5 years.
New Testament Tools, Studies, and Documents combines two series: New Testament Tools and Studies and Studies and Documents. The former was founded by Bruce M. Metzger in 1965 and edited by him until 1993, when Bart D. Ehrman joined him as co-editor. The latter series was founded by Kirsopp and Silva Lake in 1935, edited by them until the death of Kirsopp Lake in 1946, then briefly by Silva Lake and Carsten Høeg (1955), followed by Jacob Geerlings (until 1969), by Irving Alan Sparks (until 1993), and finally by Eldon Jay Epp (until 2007).

The new series will promote the publication of primary sources, reference tools, and critical studies that advance the understanding of the New Testament and other early Christian writings and writers into the fourth century. Emphases of the two predecessor series have been retained, including the textual history and transmission of the New Testament and related literature, relevant manuscripts in various languages, and methodologies for research in early Christianity. The series will also publish a broader range of studies pertinent to early Christianity and its writings.

The series published an average of 2,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Series Editor:
The name of “Paul” continues to stand at the heart of New Testament studies — as one of the first and most important interpreters and promulgators of Jesus Christ. Wherever he went as missionary, teacher, and preacher, or wherever his letters went in his stead, he rarely failed to cause a reaction. Paul continues to stand at the centre of theology and controversy, as scholars and laity alike continue to respond to him.

This series of essay collections is edited by eminent New Testament scholar Stanley Porter. It offers an important contribution to New Testament scholarship in general, and particularly to Pauline scholarship, by focusing upon major areas of study in order to throw new light on various aspects of the man and his work. The scholars involved bring various interpretative methods to their task, depending upon their own approaches and the nature of the topic itself. The volumes progress logically through several issues of continuing importance in Pauline studies. As a result, the series is both broad in scope and focused in approach.

Pauline Studies constitutes a basic resource for all those interested in Paul, including New Testament scholars, students of early Christianity, and ancient historians.

The series has published two volumes over the last 5 years.
Sources de la transmission manuscrite en Islam : livres, écrits, images is a Festschrift offered to Marie-Geneviève Guesdon, curator of Arabic manuscripts at the BNF, codicologist and specialist in Arabic manuscript books, on the occasion of her retirement.
It brings together fourteen original contributions for which the collections of the BNF provided an essential source. Handwritten transmission in Islam over the long period is the central axis of the volume. New hypotheses are emerging, both on questions of transmission by shaykhs or scribe-painters and the circulation of ideas, texts and knowledge, as well as on the status and attribution of writings, the making of books, and the history of libraries.

Sources de la transmission manuscrite en Islam : livres, écrits, images sont des mélanges offerts à Marie-Geneviève Guesdon, conservatrice des manuscrits arabes à la BNF, codicologue et spécialiste du livre manuscrit arabe, à l’occasion de son départ à la retraite. Il réunit quatorze contributions originales dont les collections de la BnF forment une source essentielle. La transmission écrite en Islam sur la longue période est l’axe central du volume. De nouvelles hypothèses emergent, aussi bien sur les questions de transmission par les shaykhs ou les scribes-peintres, de circulation des idées, des textes et des savoirs que de statut et d’attribution des écrits, de fabrication du livre et d’histoire des bibliothèques.

Avec: Annie Berthier, Zouhour Chaabane, Khalid Chakor-Alami, François Déroche, Alain J. Desreumaux, Anne-Marie Eddé, Abdelouahad Jahdani, Khaled Kchir, Françoise Micheau, Anne Regourd, Francis Richard, Muriel Roiland, Jacqueline Sublet, Tal Tamari, Saadou Traoré, Annie Vernay-Nouri Annie Berthier, Zouhour Chaabane, Khalid Chakor-Alami, François Déroche, Alain J. Desreumaux, Anne-Marie Eddé, Abdelouahad Jahdani, Khaled Kchir, Françoise Micheau, Anne Regourd, Francis Richard, Muriel Roiland, Jacqueline Sublet, Tal Tamari, Saadou Traoré, Annie Vernay-Nouri
The digital world pervades the everyday lives of most people, and online tools have become an essential part of academic research in many disciplines. This reality is true also for biblical studies and related disciplines, areas that work with complex literary traditions, multiple manuscript cultures, and many methodological approaches to the problems at the centre of our discussions. This book shines a light on multiple new and emerging approaches to big disciplinary questions in biblical studies and beyond by highlight projects that are using digital tools, crafting computer-assisted approaches, and re-thinking the resources fundamental to the history of research.
Streams of Tradition in Mark, Matthew, and Luke
This Synoptikon brings together the Synoptic Gospels, freshly translated, comparing them with materials selected from previous volumes in this series. The aim is to serve commentators who engage the Gospels critically and with the awareness that a consideration of their Judaic environments is crucial. Placing the texts within that setting evokes particular streams of tradition that interacted so as to produce the Gospels. These are set out in distinctive typefaces, so that readers may assess the depth of the Synoptic tradition as well as the breadth of its development.
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

In recent years, Johannine studies has experienced a resurgence of interest. Previous views have been rigorously re-examined and new theories proposed on many topics, including the origins of John’s Gospel, its relationship to the Synoptic Gospels, and its historiography. The number of scholars devoting their efforts to the Johannine writings and their many attendant research questions continues to grow. Brill’s Johannine Studies book series will concentrate upon topics of special relevance for Johannine research, particularly where recent work is re-conceptualizing old topics or introducing new ones. Papers will be solicited from a wide range of scholars, including Johannine scholars in particular but also those who are interested in Johannine topics and their intersection with other areas of New Testament studies.

The series has published one volume over the last 5 years.