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Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum designed in the 1960s as a structured set of handbooks on ‘matters Jewish’ illuminating the origins of Christianity, has evolved into a series of monographs and collective works on the history and literature of Jews and Christians under Roman rule. Combining expertise in Jewish, Christian, and Roman literature and history, the series aims at covering Qumranic, Graeco-Jewish, early Christian, and rabbinic sources. The classic ‘historical introduction’ published in the two volumes of The Jewish People in the First Century (1974-76) will be complemented by a number of volumes debating historiographical axioms and methods and presenting a selection of sources and a ‘joint history’ of Jews and Christians in the first and second centuries CE. Apart from the volumes planned by the editors, other publication proposals will be taken into consideration. With all these updates in methodology, the series proudly continues the pioneering work set in motion by its founders half a century ago.

Board of Editors: Shaye Cohen (Harvard University), Matthijs den Dulk (Radboud University Nijmegen), David Goodblatt (University of California at San Diego), Christine Hayes (Yale University), Richard Kalmin (Jewish Theological Seminary of America), Karl-Wilhelm Niebuhr (University of Jena), Pieter van der Horst (Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences), Huub van de Sandt (University of Tilburg), James VanderKam (University of Notre Dame). General Editors: Joshua Schwartz (Bar-Ilan University) and Peter Tomson (University of Leuven).

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
Editor:
This is the first comprehensive literary-historical online commentary on the works of Flavius Josephus in English, edited by Steve Mason (University of Groningen). At present, the online commentary is about 65% complete, comprising the Life, Against Apion, book 2 of the Judean War, and books 1-11 and 15 of the Judean Antiquities. Further volumes will continue to be added. Flavius Josephus, the first-century Jewish historian, is without a doubt the most important witness to ancient Judaism from the close of the biblical period to the aftermath of the destruction of the temple in 70 CE. His four surviving works – the Judean War, Judean Antiquities, Life, and Against Apion in thirty Greek volumes – provide the narrative structure for interpreting other, more fragmentary written sources and physical remains from this period. His descriptions of the Temple, the Judean countryside, Jewish-Roman relations and conflicts, and groups and institutions of ancient Judea have become indispensable for the student of early Judaism, of Classics, and of Christian origins alike. This wide-ranging and detailed work will prove invaluable to every serious reader of Josephus, providing a new translation and commentary, highlighting literary and historical connections.


Review Quotes: "…this series follows a format that is uncomplicated and therefore extremely user-friendly… The first two publications of the Brill Josephus Project have adequately satisfied the publisher's promise of being the first comprehensive literary-historical commentary on the works of Flavius Josephus in English… they have established a formidable, yet highly achievable standard for subsequent volumes in the series …an indispensable source of competing critical perspectives …correctly been termed an "indispensable source for all scholarly study of Judea from about 200 BCE to 75 CE"(Mason ix)." – Dennis Stoutenburg, in: Journal of Biblical Literature / Review of Biblical Literature "…diese Reihe sollten Benutzerinnen und Benutzer aus Judaistik, neu- und alttestamentlicher Wissenschaft und Alter Geschichte nicht nur in Bibliotheken nachschlagen, sondern m. E. für einen privaten Kauf ernstlich erwágen … Eine Arbeit an und mit Josephustexten wird auf Jahrzehnte ohne diesen Kommentar nicht mehr denkbar sein." – Marco Frenschkowski, in:Theologische Literaturzeitung, 2003 "The commentary is generally wide-ranging and very readable." – F.G. Downing, in: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, 2002
Schedule, Flavius Josephus: Translation and Commentary
Updated Schedule January 2021
Vol Authors Title Planned for
1a Sievers/Seeman/Forte/Mason War 1 2022
1b Mason War 2 Published 2008
1c Seeman War 3 2023
2a Mason War 4 2024
2b Chapman War 5 2023
2c Martin/Levenson War 6 2022
2d McLaren War 7 2022
3 Feldman/Mason Ant 1-4 Published 1999
4 Begg Ant. 5-7 Published 2005
5 Begg/ Spilsbury Ant. 8-10 Published 2006
6 Spilsbury Ant. 11 Published 2016
6b Lembi Ant. 12-13 2022
7a Lembi/ van Henten Ant. 14 2022
7b van Henten Ant. 15 Published 2013
7c Van Henten Ant. 16-17 2023

8 Schwartz Ant 18-20 2022

9 Mason Life 2000

10 Barclay Against Apion 2007
Judaism and Christianity share much of a heritage. There has been a good deal of interest of late in this phenomenon, examining both this common heritage, as well as the elements unique to each religion. There has, however, been no systematic attempt to present findings relative to both Jewish and Christian tradition to a broad audience of scholars. It is the aim of this series to do just that.
Jewish and Christian Perspectives publishes studies that are relevant to both Christianity and Judaism. The series includes works relating to the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, the Second Temple period, the Judaeo-Christian polemic (from ancient to modern times), Rabbinical literature relevant to Christianity, Patristics, Medieval Studies and the modern period. Special interest is paid to the interaction between the religions throughout the ages. Historical, exegetical, philosophical and theological studies are welcomed as well as studies focusing on sociological and anthropological issues common to both religions including archaeology.
The series is published in co-operation with the Bar-Ilan University and the Schechter Institute in Israel, the Faculty of Catholic Theology of the Tilburg University and the Protestant Theological University in the Netherlands. It includes monographs and congress volumes in the English language, and is intended for international distribution on a scholarly level.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.

This commentary series aims to make Philo’s thought accessible to readers such as graduate students who are just beginning to read him, but also contains much material that will be of interest to specialists in Hellenistic Judaism, ancient philosophy and patristic literature.

The series published one volume over the last 5 years.
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

Volume Editors: and
For Jews and Christians in Antiquity beliefs about demons were integral to their reflections on fundamental theological questions, but what kind of ‘being’ did they consider demons to be? To what extent were they thought to be embodied? Were demons thought of as physical entities or merely as metaphors for social and psychological realities? What is the relation between demons and the hypostatization of abstract concepts (fear, impurity, etc) and baleful phenomenon such as disease? These are some of the questions that this volume addresses by focussing on the nature and characteristics of demons — what one might call ‘demonic ontology’.
Essays on the Greek Translations and Other Ancient Versions by the Association for the Study of the Septuagint in South Africa (LXXSA)
Volume Editors: and
This volume tackles topics relevant to the study of the Septuagint and related fields of research, such as the historical context of the Greek translations and texts, their anthropology, theology, language, and reception, as well as the comparison of the Septuagint with other ancient translations and texts of its intellectual environment. The authors make contributions to the study of the texts themselves, their themes, and theories in modern research on the ancient artefacts.
These essays reflect the lively debate about the sectarian movement of the Scrolls. They debate the degree to which the movement was separated from the rest of Judaism, and whether there was one or several watershed moments in the separation. Notable contributions include a cluster of essays on the Teacher of Righteousness and a thorough survey of the archaeology of Qumran. The texts are problematic in historical research because they rely on biblical stereotypes. Nonetheless, possible interpretations can be compared and degrees of probability debated. The debate is significant not only for the sect but for the nature of ancient Judaism.
Author:
The only narratives of Jesus’ birth locate the event in Bethlehem, but the adult Jesus is consistently associated with Nazareth. How do we reconcile these two indisputable facts? Some dismiss Bethlehem as a theologoumenon, a theological fabrication. Others insist on Bethlehem based on the census of Quirinius. In the present volume, N. Clayton Croy argues that both are wrong. Instead Jesus’ birthplace was determined by the scandalous nature of Mary’s pregnancy, with it being necessary for Mary and Joseph to escape the inevitable shame of an ill-timed conception and decamp to a less hostile environment. In this light, a Bethlehem-born Jesus who grew up in Nazareth should never have been considered problematic.
Author:
Much can be learned about a translation’s linguistic and cultural context by studying it as a text, a literary artifact of the culture that produced it. However, its nature as a translation warrants a careful approach, one that pays attention to the process by which its various features came about. In Characterizing Old Greek Deuteronomy as an Ancient Translation, Jean Maurais develops a framework derived from Descriptive Translation Studies to bring both these aspects in conversation. He then outlines how the Deuteronomy translator went about his task and provides a characterization of the work as a literary product.