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How do intellectual traditions interact? This is the fundamental question driving this book, which explores a case study set in the early Islamicate world: the Treatise on Divine Unity According to the Doctrine of the Christians by the Christian-Arabic theologian and philosopher Yaḥyā ibn ʿAdī (d. 974). The book attempts to contextualise the treatise and its intellectual environment by exploring the interplay between philosophy, Christian theology and Islam. This volume includes a revised Arabic text of Samir’s 2015 edition, collated with the manuscript Tehran, Madrasa-yi Marwī 19, recently discovered by prof. Robert Wisnovsky.
Eastern Christian Texts (ECT) is dedicated to the publication of new translated critical editions – or of translations of existing editions –, accompanied by studies and commentaries, of significant works that expressed the intellectual and religious life of Eastern Christian communities from the 1st to the 21st century making them accessible to scholars, students, and the general public.
Byzantium is more and more recognized as a vibrant culture in dialogue with neighbouring regions, political entities, and peoples. Where better to look for this kind of dynamism than in the interactions between the Byzantines and the Armenians? Warfare and diplomacy are only one part of that story. The more enduring part consists of contact and mutual influence brokered by individuals who were conversant in both cultures and languages. The articles in this volume feature fresh work by younger and established scholars that illustrate the varieties of interaction in the fields of literature, material culture, and religion.
Contributors are: Gert Boersema, Emilio Bonfiglio, Bernard Coulie, Karen Hamada, Robin Meyer, Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Claudia Rapp, Mark Roosien, Werner Seibt, Emmanuel Van Elverdinghe, Theo Maarten van Lint, Alexandra-Kyriaki Wassiliou-Seibt, and David Zakarian.
Aḥob of Qatar and the Development of the East Syriac Exegetical Tradition
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In The Heirs of Theodore Seth M. Stadel examines Aḥob of Qatar, a late 6th-century East Syriac biblical commentator, and his surviving Old Testament exegetical works. He further investigates what can be deduced of Aḥob’s influence on the later East Syriac exegetical tradition, and he details the originality of Aḥob’s exegesis, especially in comparison with earlier and contemporary Greek and Syriac sources. By presenting the first annotated edition, English translation, and study of Aḥob’s extant Old Testament exegetical works, Stadel is able to show that Aḥob represents a distinct voice within the East Syriac exegetical tradition.
Authoritative, and Fully Annotated, based on the best Syriac Text
The Bible of Edessa is an authoritative translation of the Peshitta, the Syriac version of the Hebrew Bible. Syriac was the form of Aramaic used in the city of Edessa in upper Mesopotamia the birthplace of the Peshitta.
The Bible of Edessa is based on the oldest and best Syriac manuscripts, as published in the Leiden–Amsterdam Peshitta edition. The translation are also furnished with an introduction and extensive annotations. The Bible of Edessa is authorized by the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) and published by the Amsterdam Peshitta Institute under supervision of an international editorial board.
Author:
Authoritative, Based on the Best Syriac Text, and Fully Annotated

The Bible of Edessa is an authoritative translation of the Peshitta, the Syriac version of the Hebrew Bible. It is named after the city of Edessa in upper Mesopotamia, the birthplace of the Peshitta and home to the form of Aramaic now called Syriac.
The Bible of Edessa is based on the oldest and best Syriac manuscripts, as made available in the Leiden–Amsterdam Peshitta edition. Its volumes also come with an introduction and extensive annotations. The Bible of Edessa is authorized by the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) and published by the Amsterdam Peshitta Institute under supervision of an international editorial board.

CHRONICLES– This is the first volume of this new series. It contains David Phillips’ annotated English translation of the Book of Chronicles according to the Peshitta.
This book series is designed to offer texts and editions, with commentary and comment, of important sources for the study of the New Testament and its world. Primary sources are envisioned as a mainstay of the series, in which documents that enlighten and support New Testament study are published in definitive, accessible and informative editions, often with supporting commentary. Collections of essays and monographs, that focus upon these types of important sources and advance the scholarly discussion, are also welcome.

The series has published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation with an Introduction
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Cyril ibn Laqlaq’s Book of Confession offers the critical edition and translation of a treatise that is published here for the first time. Cyril, the 75th Coptic Patriarch, was a controversial figure who was judged for simony by his own bishops in an official synod. Despite his failure to promote auricular confession during his lifetime, the widespread distribution of his treatise had a significant impact on the practice's adoption. The Book of Confession is well attested in the manuscript tradition. The vast inventory of manuscripts attests to its popularity among diverse Christian denominations throughout the Middle East. Undoubtedly, it has been a highly influential text in the formation of spiritual life and penitential theology in the Middle Ages.