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The Ma‘asé-Ester, “Esther’s affairs”, is a 14th-century Judeo-Provençal poem on the story of Esther, intended for a recital during the banquet for Purim.
The short poem – recently discovered in the single manuscript that preserves it – is a new precious document that enriches a small corpus of medieval Judeo-Provençal texts. This book offers the first critical edition of the complete text accompanied by a detailed study of the sources and the language. It guides us in understanding why the story of Esther became such a popular theme in 14th-century Provence, and in what way the Avignon Papacy and the studies on Moses Maimonides influenced this literary novelty.
Volume Editors: and
In The Hebrew Bible: A Millennium, scholars from different fields and dealing with different material sources are trying to consider the Hebrew Bible as a whole. The development of new databases and other technological tools have an increasing impact on research practices. By inviting doctoral students, young researchers, and established scholars to contribute, this interdisciplinary book showcases methods and perspectives which can support future scientific collaborations in the field of the Hebrew Bible.
This edited volume gathers relevant research from Dead Sea Scrolls Studies, Cairo Genizah Studies, European Genizah Studies, and from Late Medieval Biblical Manuscript Studies.
Editor:
This richly illustrated volume offers the most comprehensive and updated survey on about sixteen thousand Hebrew manuscript fragments reused as book-bindings and preserved in hundreds of libraries and archives in Italy. Contributions by the leading scholars in the field elucidate specific collections and genres no less than individual fragments, bringing to new life a forgotten library of medieval Jewish books, as almost 160 Talmudic codices, which include the Mishna, Tosefta, Palestinian Talmud and, for the most part, the Babylonian one, and several hitherto unknown texts. The contribution of these fragments to the ongoing research on the “European Genizah”, as the Books within Books Project, and to Jewish Studies in general cannot be overestimated.
A critical scholarly edition of the Karaite Yefet ben ʿEli ha-Levi's (10th-century) Judaeo-Arabic translation of and commentary on the prophetic books Amos, Haggai, and Malachi, including a comparison of 19 manuscripts and an extensive introduction. The introduction discusses Yefet's exegesis of the three books, his approaches to the biblical narratives, his polemic with the Rabbanites, and the exegetical principles he uses in his translation of the verses. Yefet ben ʿEli was one of the most important biblical commentators of the early Middle Ages. He translated all the books of the Bible into Judaeo-Arabic and composed a long commentary on them. His commentaries on the books of Amos, Haggai, and Malachi reflect his method of biblical exegesis and present unique interpretive ideas.
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This work contains a Hebrew and an English section. The former is an edition of the Maḥberot Eitan ha-Ezraḥi, a maqama collection composed after the pattern of al-Ḥarizi’s Taḥkemoni. The edition opens with an introduction, translated at the beginning of the English section. The rest of the English section is devoted to an analysis of that branch of the Hebrew maqama tradition that is rooted in the Maqāmāt of al-Ḥarīrī, starting from a review of the evidence for the presence of the Maqāmāt in the world of Hebrew letters, through the Taḥkemoni, and concluding with the Maḥbarot of Immanuel ha-Romi.
Author:
Through the application of scientific methods of analysis to a corpus of medieval manuscripts found in the Cairo Genizah, this work aims to gain a better understanding of the writing materials used by Jewish communities at that time, shedding new light not only on the production of manuscripts in the Middle Ages, but also on the life of those Jewish communities.
Tanhuma-Yelammedenu Literature enables a rare and unique look into the Jewish society of late antiquity and the early Byzantine period, especially the interaction between the beit-midrash and the synagogue cultures. This little-studied corpus is the focus of the present volume, in which various authors study historical, philological, cultural or linguistic aspects of this literature. The result is a body of work dedicated to this important corpus, and is a first step into giving it its proper place in Jewish Studies.
Critical Editions of the Translation by Moses Ibn Tibbon and the Translation Ascribed to Rabbi Jacob, with an Introduction and Glossary. Books I–II
Author:
Euclid's Elements is one of the canonical texts that shaped our cultural heritage. It was translated from Greek into Arabic and from Arabic into Hebrew and Latin. There is little agreement about the textual history of the Arabic translations. The present book offers for the first time a critical edition of two Hebrew translations of Books I–II, by Moses Ibn Tibbon and by "Rabbi Jacob". A serious attempt is made to learn from the Hebrew translations also about the history of the Arabic text. The edition of Ibn Tibbon's translation is accompanied by an Arabic text which was probably its source. Rabbi Jacob's translation is compared to the Latin translation ascribed to Adelard of Bath, probably based on the same Arabic tradition.
A varied collection of articles on early Hebrew printing, encompassing motifs on title pages such as lions, eagles, and fish as well as the entitling of Hebrew books. The next section is on authors and places of publication addressing such diverse topics as a much republished book opposed to gambling, authors of books on philology and on the massacres of tah-ve-tat (1648–49); of articles on diverse and disparate places of printing, Chierie, Hamburg, Offenbach, Verona, and Slavuta, generally small barely remembered publishers of interesting works, and in the last location properly identifying the printer of the highly regarded Slavuta press. Included is a section on Christian-Hebraism with articles on Altdorf where polemical books were published and another on William Wotten, a Christian vicar who published the first English translation of Mishnayot. The result is a wide-ranging series of articles highlighting the activities of early Hebrew presses and printers.
This book presents an edition and English translation of a medieval commentary on the book of Hosea that was written by an anonymous Karaite author in the Middle Ages. The text has been established by joining together hundreds of small fragments that have been preserved in the Cairo Genizah collections. The edited work is written in Judaeo-Arabic (Arabic in Hebrew letters). The publication includes copious notes, which clarify the meaning and background of the text. This book brings into the light of scholarship an important but hitherto lost text in the intellectual history of the Karaites.