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Studies in Periodical Cultures (SPC) contributes to the bourgeoning field of periodical studies, exploring magazines, newspapers, and other forms of serialized media in (trans)national contexts. Research into periodicals is of high interest to many because of the medium’s pervasiveness and its enmeshment with the formation of cultural identities. This book series considers periodicals as important artifacts, seeking to assess their role for processes of cultural transfer and translation. SPC looks at how periodicals evolve in and through networks of people, material infrastructures, media markets, and changing technologies. Likewise, the community-building potential of periodicals will be considered. SPC wants to determine what function periodicals have as sites of affection, but also as aesthetic and material sources for the arts and literature. The book series produces a much-needed bridge between historical/archival approaches and present work in the field of media studies by highlighting the legacies and trajectories of the periodical business from 18th-century print to the digital age.

SPC invites contributions from a range of disciplines including approaches developed in the humanities and social sciences. Transnational approaches to periodical studies, which provide, among others, fresh insights into foreign language publications, the role of international editions, the ethnic press, and related issues like race, gender, and sexuality are all welcome. SPC also promotes the ‘business turn’ in periodical studies and highlights material and legal frameworks, design, translation, marketing and consumption. It solicits studies about editorial procedures, the distribution, and the reception of periodicals. This book series encourages work about regional, national, and transnational communication networks, investigating, for instance, how rival publications and their interrelated dynamics shape the periodicals’ formal, material, and visual attributes. In practice, SPC proposes to study periodicals less as autonomous objects, but rather as agents embedded in changing historical contexts. SPC thus offers theoretical and methodological approaches to an interdisciplinary, transnational conception of periodical studies, and publishes peer-reviewed volumes in different languages.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
We strongly recommend the use of the Chicago Manual of Style in this series.

Subject areas for exploration:
Periodicals and Transculturality
Literary Magazines as Transnational Periodicals
Transnational Periodicals and the Ethnic Press
Transnational Periodicals, Typography, and Graphic Communication
Transnational Periodicals and the Production of Knowledge
Periodical Studies and the Impact of the Archive
Regionalism and Transnational Periodicals
25 Books from Leiden That Changed the World
Books That Made History highlights twenty-five books published in Leiden or written by a Leiden scholar or alumnus, that have a strong connection to Leiden’s academic history, from the founding of Leiden University in 1575 to the present day. These books have a lasting, global impact on our way of thinking, and are relevant up to this day. The books are described from a contemporary perspective in order to elicit the reader's sense of wonder that the contemporary ideas and insights anchored in the books are inextricably linked to the publication in which they were first made public to the world.
Anyone who has studied the history of the Reformation, the book and communication will have come across or been influenced by Andrew Pettegree’s contributions to these fields. The essays in this Festschrift have been commissioned to cover the broad scope of Pettegree’s areas of interest and expertise, and to reflect and build upon them. The pieces, written by forty-three scholars based at over thirty institutions, are organised around nine key themes, ranging from the intersections of religion and print to the history of book collecting, the periodical press and pioneering book historical research methodologies.
This second volume contains twenty-seven essays. Together with the first volume, 'Reformation, Religious Culture and Print in Early Modern Europe: Essays in Honour of Andrew Pettegree, Volume 1', it offers a comprehensive survey of the state of current scholarship on religion, printing and media change in early modern Europe.

Contributors to this volume: Renaud Adam, Jacob Baxter, Natasha Constantinidou, Hanna de Lange, Arthur der Weduwen, Paul Dijstelberge, Shanti Graheli, Earle Havens, Paul Hoftijzer, Graeme Kemp, Justyna Kiliańczyk-Zięba, Joop Koopmans, Nina Lamal, Saskia Limbach, Karin Maag, Alicia Montoya, Angela Nuovo, John Sibbald, Joke Spaans, Drew Thomas, Sandra Toffolo, Arjan van Dijk, Michiel van Groesen, Steven Van Impe, Malcolm Walsby, and Alexander Wilkinson.
Anyone who has studied the history of the Reformation, the book and communication will have come across or been influenced by Andrew Pettegree’s contributions to these fields. The forty-four essays in this Festschrift and its companion volume have been commissioned to cover the broad scope of Pettegree’s areas of interest and expertise, and to reflect and build upon them. The pieces, written by forty-three scholars based at over thirty institutions, are organised around nine key themes, ranging from the intersections of religion and print to the history of book collecting, the periodical press and pioneering book historical research methodologies.
This first volume contains nineteen essays. Together with the second volume, 'The Book World of Early Modern Europe: Essays in Honour of Andrew Pettegree, Volume 2', it offers a wid-ranging survey of the state of current scholarship on religion, printing and media change in early modern Europe.

Contributors to this volume: Riccardo Bavaj, Flavia Bruni, Arthur der Weduwen, Alastair Duke, Bruce Gordon, Brian Hanson, Mack Holt, Richard Kirwan, Katell Lavéant, Ian Maclean, Guido Marnef, Jonathan Reid, Alec Ryrie, Grant Tapsell, Margo Todd, Natale Vacalebre, Arjan van Dijk, Malcolm Walsby, and Elise Watson.
A Comparative Study of Four National Literary Traditions
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This literary analysis of the representation of ‘Gypsies’ in juvenile literature is unique in its comparative scope, as well as in the special attention to rare pre-1850 narratives, the period in which juvenile literature developed as a specific genre. Most studies on the subject are about one national literary tradition or confined to a limited period. In this study Dutch, English, French and German texts are analysed and discussed with reference to main academic publications on the subject. Emphasis is on the rich variation in narrative presentations, rather than on an inventory of images or prejudices. An important topic is the fundamental difference between early English and German narratives. Important because of the wide dissemination of German stories.
The influence of censorship on the intellectual and political life in the Habsburg Monarchy during the period under scrutiny can hardly be overstated. This study examines the institutional foundations, operating principles, and results of the censorial activity through analysis of the prohibition lists and examination of the censors themselves. The effects of censorship on the authors, publishers, and booksellers of the time are illustrated with the help of contemporary documents. Numerous case studies focus on individual works forbidden by the censors: Romanticists like Ludwig Tieck and E. T. A. Hoffmann and even authors of classic German literature like Wieland, Goethe, and Schiller saw their works slashed, as did writers of popular French and English novels and plays. An annex documents the most important regulations along with a selection of censorial reports.     
A Descriptive Bibliography of the Works Published in the Seventeenth Century
In Printing Spinoza Jeroen van de Ven systematically examines all seventeenth-century printed editions of Spinoza’s writings, published between 1663 and 1694, as well as their variant ‘issues’. In focus are Spinoza’s 1663 adumbration of René Descartes’s ‘Principles of Philosophy’ with his own ‘Metaphysical Thoughts’, the ‘Theological-Political Treatise’ (1670), and the posthumous writings (1677), including the famously-known ‘Ethics’.
Van de Ven’s descriptive bibliography studies, contextualizes, and records all aspects of the publication history of Spinoza’s writings from manuscript to print and assesses their immediate reception. It discusses the printed books’ codicology, philology, typographical and textual relationships, illustration programmes, as well as their dissemination in early Enlightenment Europe, in view of the physical aspects of 1,246 extant copies and their provenance.
This is the first study of Jacobean Scotland's largest library: the collection assembled over several generations by the Lindsays of Balcarres. It challenges prior understandings of pre-Union Scotland's book culture, presents the catalogue of a collection of international importance for the first time, and recovers the intellectual history behind this "Great Bibliotheck".
The volume includes chapters on the history of the library to the Restoration (Jane Stevenson) and from Restoration to Enlightenment (Kelsey Jackson Williams) as well as a detailed discussion of the library's reconstruction (William Zachs and Jackson Williams), a full catalogue, and appendices.
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This book aims at bringing together and providing all the information available on the Bible in the early Irish church (A.D. 550-850), drawing on some sources not well known for this subject, such as Columbanus, the early writer Apponius, St Gall list of works in Irish script, and the Libri scottice scripti. The beginnings are stressed after which the biblical compositions for three following centuries are given. The direct links of Irish literal Psalm interpretation with the fourth-century Antioch on the Orontes school are made clear, as is the presence of apocryphal and extra biblical, and possibly Jewish, tradition, in the poems of Blathmac and other Irish compositions.

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