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The first European map of China faintly relied on the copy of a Chinese original, obtained through bribing and espionage; the last covered in this book was the result of the largest land survey ever made until that time. These two and another 125 maps depict, sometimes uniquely, sometimes copying each other, a country whose images were so different that it was hard to understand which to trust.

This study reproduces and describes, for the first time, all the maps of China printed in Europe between 1584 and 1735, unravelling the origin of each individual map, their different printing, issues and publication dates. It also tells, for each, the unique story that made possible these visions from another world, stories marked by scholarly breakthroughs, obsession, missionary zeal, commercial sagacity and greed.

For a presentation from the author related to the publication entitled China on Copper Plates: The First 150 Years of Chinese Maps in Western Prints (1584-1735), see: here.

A summary:
On June 23, 2022, the fourth session of the academic lecture series on "The Weavers of Four-Dimensional Space-Time and Their Creation" on the History of Maps was held in the form of an online seminar at the Kuang-Chi International Scholars Center. Dr. Marco Caboara, an Italian scholar from the Lee Shau Kee Library of Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, gave a lively presentation entitled "China on Copperplate - the First 150 Years of Western Printed Maps of China, 1584-1735". The lecture was conducted in both Chinese and English. Associate Professor Lin Hong from the School of Humanities of Shanghai Normal University served as the moderator and translator. Dr. Yang Xunling, Deputy Director of the Library of Macau University of Science and Technology, served as the main responder. Professor Huang Yijun of Minzu University of China, and Deputy Youth Associate of Fudan University Researcher Ding Yannan, Dr. Catarina Batista and Dr. Ângela Gil from the Library of Macau University of Science and Technology, and Dr. Zheng Man from the Free University of Berlin participated in the discussion. Many domestic and foreign scholars and map enthusiasts listened to the lecture online. The lecture lasted nearly three hours.
Editor-in-Chief:
Brill Research Perspectives in Map History offers comprehensive reference resources for scholars and students working in, or who want to familiarize themselves with map history. The series provides in-depth scholarly articles on the main topics in the field. Brill Research Perspectives in Map History contributes to a better understanding of the field with original and reliable essays about traditional as well as innovative topics about different genres of maps from all periods and cultures from an interdisciplinary point of view. While the series is open to new subjects, it will be focused on “non-current” cartifacts and mapping processes, i.e. historical maps and mappings, the history of cartography and other related topics, which might include their influence or impact on our present days.

If you are interested in writing a Research Perspective, or would like to know more, please get in touch with either the Editor-in-Chief Carla Lois, or the Publisher at Brill Wendel Scholma.
This Liber Amicorum was presented to Dr. Peter van der Krogt on 24 June 2022 on the occasion of his retirement as Jansonius curator of the collection of maps & atlases at Allard Pierson at the University of Amsterdam. A large number of colleagues from home and abroad have written a personal and/or scientific contribution, in which they express their appreciation for Peter, or reminisce or discuss a topic from the core area of Peter's own research field: atlases and globes. In this way the rich, forty-year-long career of Peter is highlighted in various ways.

This book also contains a biography and a complete list of publications of Peter.
Maps and Territory-Building in the Northern Indochinese Peninsula (1885-1914)
Author:
Translator:
This book presents a connected history of South-East Asian borderlands, drawing on late nineteenth-century British and French geographical policies and practice. It focuses on the ‘scramble’ in Asia, when, in 1885, the British Raj incorporated Upper Burma and the French created a Protectorate in Annam-Tonkin, the Northern part of present-day Vietnam. Fought over by the imperial states and neighbouring nations, the frontier zones were fashioned and represented not only by the two European powers, but also by the Chinese Empire, the Kingdom of Siam, and the local populations. The counterpoint between the discourses produced and the cartographical practices on the ground, in the longue durée, reveals the interacting processes of territory-building in all their unpredictability.
This book is the updated version of the author’s Aux confins des empires. Cartes et constructions territoriales dans le nord de la péninsule indochinoise (1885–1914) (Paris: Éditions de la Sorbonne, 2018). It is translated by Saskia Brown, an experienced academic translator from French in the humanities and social sciences.
Volume Editor:
Although we live in a globalised world, territorially embedded factors are highly relevant in such domains as security, economy, energy, environment, politics & diplomacy. Today’s analysts of world affairs are often loosely referring to ‘geopolitics’, but do not always clearly define it. This book therefore offers a necessary framework: an introduction into the main components of geopolitical analysis, an overview of the main geopolitical schools of thought, as well as reflections on how technology and geopolitics affect each other in economy, energy and security. In addition, several empirical studies are showcased, each developing innovative approaches. Leading authors reflect upon containment, analyse geopolitical myths, research geoeconomic rivalries, study mental maps, analyse conflict through territorially embedded variables & greed motivations and apply ‘neo-medievalism’ to study sub-state diplomacy.

Contributors include: David Criekemans, Gyula Csurgai, Luis da Vinha, Manuel Duran, Alexandre Lambert, Antonios Nestoras, and Steven Spittaels.
Brill’s 'Mapping the Past' is a peer-reviewed book series exploring and revitalizing the relationship between the history of mapping and the mapping of history. The series editors stimulate to explore the potential of maps for the study of the past, and accordingly the series aims at cross-fertilizing the history of cartography with disciplines such as history, landscape studies, geography, art history, digital humanities, urban planning and heritage studies. Volumes take the study of maps and mapmaking practices as a crucial starting point for understanding the evolutions, representations and imaginations of past societies, landscapes and territories. They may equally present the results of broader collaborative research projects or detailed case studies, insofar they have wider methodological and theoretical relevance. The series has no temporal or geographical limitations and both monographs and coherently presented edited volumes are welcomed.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals or full manuscripts to the series editors Bram Vannieuwenhuyze and Iason Jongepier, or to the publisher at Brill, Wendel Scholma.
Cihānnümā is the summa of Ottoman geography and one of the axial texts of Islamic intellectual history. Kātib Çelebi (d. 1657) sought to combine the Islamic geographical tradition with the new European discoveries, atlases and surveys. His cosmography included a comprehensive description of the regions of the world, extending westward from Japan and as far as the eastern Ottoman provinces. Ebū Bekr b. Behrām ed-Dimaşḳī (d. 1691) continued with a survey of the Arab countries and the remaining Ottoman provinces of Anatolia. İbrāhīm Müteferriḳa combined the two, with additional notes and maps of his own, in one of the earliest Ottoman printed books, Kitāb-ı Cihānnümā (1732).
Our translation includes the entire text of Müteferriḳa’s edition, distinguishing clearly between the contributions of the three authors. Based on Kātib Çelebi’s original manuscript we have made hundreds of corrections to Müteferriḳa’s text. Additional corrections are based on comparison with Kātib Çelebi’s Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Latin and Italian sources.
Author:
More often than not, readers of travel narratives can expect to find at least one map—if not several—showing, as English privateer William Dampier wrote, “the Course of the Voyage,” that is, where the author-traveler went and, implicitly, a sense of what was seen and experienced. Dampier used a now-common cartographic strategy to tell the story from beginning to end as well as around significant places on the way by marking the journey with a ‘pricked’ line. Despite the lines’ popularity and present ubiquity, the complex intellectual and material process of considering travel as a continuum rather than as a series of stops along the way and of plotting a journey onto a map have attracted relatively little academic attention. Drawing on a thousand years of European travel writing and map-making, Jordana Dym suggests that after centuries of text-based itineraries and on-the-spot directions guiding travelers and constituting their reports, maps in the fifteenth century emerged as tools for Europeans to support and report the results of land and sea travel. Called in subsequent centuries 'route maps,' 'itinerary maps,' and 'travel maps,' often interchangeably, what Dym defines as journey maps added lines of travel to show where travelers had been. Sine their emergence, most have taken one of two forms: itinerary maps, which connected stages as points with a line, and route maps, which tracked unbroken lines between endpoints. In the seventeenth century, the conventions of journey mapping were codified and increasingly incorporated into travel writing and other genres that represented individual travel. With each succeeding generation, these linear journey maps have become increasingly common and complex, responding to changes in forms of transportation, such as air and motor car ‘flight’ and print technology, especially the advent of multi-color printing. This is their story.
Volume Editor:
Medieval Christian European and Arabic-Islamic cultures are both notable for the wealth and diversity of their geographical literature, yet to date there has been relatively little attempt to compare medieval Christian and Islamic mapping traditions in a detailed manner. Cartography between Christian Europe and the Arabic-Islamic World offers a timely assessment of the level of interaction between the two traditions across a range of map genres, including world and regional maps, maps of the seven climes, and celestial cartography. Through a mixture of synthesis and case study, the volume makes the case for significant but limited cultural transfer.
Contributors are: Elly Dekker; Jean-Charles Ducène; Alfred Hiatt; Yossef Rapoport; Stefan Schröder; Emmanuelle Vagnon.
Early Modern Personifications of the Continents
Since antiquity, artists have visualized the known world through the female (sometimes male) body. In the age of exploration, America was added to figures of Europe, Asia, and Africa who would come to inhabit the borders of geographical visual imagery. In the abundance of personifications in print, painting, ceramics, tapestry, and sculpture, do portrayals vary between hierarchy and global human dignity? Are we witnessing the emergence of ethnography or of racism? Yet, as this volume shows, depictions of bodies as places betray the complexity of human claims and desires. Bodies and Maps: Early Modern Personifications of the Continents opens up questions about early modern politics, travel literature, sexualities, gender, processes of making, and the mobility of forms and motifs.

Contributors are: Louise Arizzoli, Elisa Daniele, Hilary Haakenson, Elizabeth Horodowich, Maryanne Cline Horowitz, Ann Rosalind Jones, Paul H. D. Kaplan, Marion Romberg, Mark Rosen, Benjamin Schmidt, Chet Van Duzer, Bronwen Wilson, and Michael Wintle.