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International studies in Hellenic and Roman theology.
Classical Perspectives on Ascent in the Journey to God
Volume Editors: and
How does one grow holy in such times? This question drove the early Christian imagination no less than it does today. Patristic Spirituality: Classical Perspectives on Ascent to the Divine features numerous studies offering an “itinerary” for early Christian believers wishing to enter into the divine presence. Readers will discover an array of perennial early Christian wisdom into the practical challenges of ascent, “a work of God in Christ, transforming and incorporating us,” says Lewis Ayres. See how early Christians cultivated the life of grace with hospitality, silence, almsgiving, and other ascetic practices for human elevation into mystical union with God.

Contributors are: Benjamin D. Wayman, John S. Bergsma and Luke Iyengar, Hans Boersma, Stanley E. Porter, Gregory Vall Don W. Springer, Bogdan G. Bucur, Amy Brown Hughes, Sean Argondizza-Moberg, Stephen M. Hildebrand, Brian Matz, Anna Silvas, Ann Conway-Jones, Sandy L. Haney, Despina D. Prassas, Gerald Boersma, Brian E. Daley, Andrew Louth, Jonathan L. Zecher, Kevin M. Clarke, Lewis Ayres.
Scholarly monographs on the religious iconography of ancient Greece and Rome.
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.

This is part I of a two-part set.
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.

This is volume II of a two-volume set.
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Écrite entre 386 et 390 dans l’effervescence de la découverte du néoplatonisme, la correspondance entre Augustin et son ami Nebridius est un concentré de questions platoniciennes sur l’infini, la distinction entre le sensible et l’intelligible, l’imagination et la réminiscence, les rêves inspirés, l’assimilation à Dieu, le « véhicule » de l’âme, l’intériorité et l’individualité. S’y ajoutent des développements théologiques majeurs sur l’Incarnation et la Trinité. Grâce à ces lettres qui font tour à tour « entendre le Christ, Platon et Plotin », comme le dit Nebridius lui-même, nous comprenons mieux ce moment incandescent de la vie d’Augustin où il se convertit à la fois à la philosophie et au christianisme, comme en témoigneront plus tard les Confessions.

Written between 386 and 390 during the excitement of his discovery of Neoplatonism, Augustine’s correspondence with his friend Nebridius is a distillation of Platonic questions concerning the infinite, the distinction between sensible and intelligible phenomena, the imagination and recollection, inspired dreams, assimilation to God, the “vehicle” of the soul, interiority, and individuality. In addition, the exchange contains major theological insights concerning the Incarnation and the Trinity. Thanks to these letters, which, as Nebridius himself says, make “Christ, Plato, and Plotinus heard,” we can better understand this incandescent moment in Augustine’s life when he converted to both philosophy and Christianity, as the Confessions will later testify.
Brill's Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity E-Books Online, Collection 2022 is the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity in 2022.

Coverage:
Biblical Studies, Ancient Judaism, Ancient Near East, Egyptology, Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnosticism & Manichaeism, Early Church & Patristics

This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity E-Books Online Collection.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

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This volume, examining the reception of ancient rhetoric, aims to demonstrate that the past is always part of the present: in the ways in which decisions about crucial political, social and economic matters have been made historically; or in organic interaction with literature, philosophy and culture at the core of the foundation principles of Western thought and values. Analysis is meant to cover the broadest possible spectrum of considerations that focus on the totality of rhetorical species (i.e. forensic, deliberative and epideictic) as they are applied to diversified topics (including, but not limited to, language, science, religion, literature, theatre and other cultural processes (e.g. athletics), politics and leadership, pedagogy and gender studies) and cross-cultural, geographical and temporal contexts.
This book asks why politically-powerful entities invested in the Amphiareion, a sanctuary renowned for its precarity and dependency. The answer lies in unravelling the intricacies of the shrine’s epigraphical record and the stories about the communities and individuals responsible for creating it. By explaining patterns in inscribed display against the backdrop of broader events and phenomena emerging within central Greece, this book revisits the Amphiareion’s narrative and emphasises its political implications for its neighbours. This interpretation offers new perspectives on the sanctuary and exposes agents’ manipulation of it in the course of reinventing their self-image in a changing Greek world.
Volume Editors: and
Aetiologies seem to gratify the human desire to understand the origin of a phenomenon. However, as this book demonstrates, aetiologies do not exclusively explore origins. Rather, in inventing origin stories they authorise the present and try to shape the future. This book explores aetiology as a tool for thinking, and draws attention to the paradoxical structure of origin stories. Aetiologies reduce complex ambivalence and plurality to plainly causal and temporal relations, but at the same time, by casting an anchor into the past, they open doors to progress and innovation.