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Editor:
Brill's Series in Jewish Studies aims to publish new knowledge and deepen our understanding of Jews and Judaism, through the lens of their engagement with non-Jewish populations and cultures throughout history. This aim reflects the fact that not only Jewish experiences but also Jewish ideologies emerged, originally and consciously, in the context of and in relation to other communities, cultures and powers. Within these thematic parameters, the scope of the Series is limited neither to the Diaspora, nor to any period, method or discipline.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Conference Proceedings of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London
The IJS Studies in Judaica series is primarily devoted to the publication of annual conferences of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London, although individual monographs are also welcome on any aspect of Jewish Studies and related disciplines. The volumes bring together, often for the first time, eminent scholars from different countries working in historical, literary, and linguistic research areas relevant to all periods of Jewish Studies, from antiquity to modernity. Examples of themes include biblical studies (within the ancient world), medieval Hebrew science, and history of Zionism, with the aim being to cover the latest trends in cutting-edge research in Jewish Studies in its broadest context.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Editor:
The series is uniquely devoted to Judeo-Slavic studies. It covers all aspects of the history and culture of Jews in the Slavic world and the encounter between Jewish and Slavic cultures (including language, literature, and arts) from the Middle Ages to the present day. The series aims to provide a forum for the growing interest and research in the field across disciplines. It welcomes monographs, collected volumes, and editions of primary sources.

Submission Information:
Proposals may be submitted to Alexander Kulik (akulik@mscc.huji.ac.il) and should include a brief (up to one page) description including the following items: author(s)/editor(s) names with addresses and affiliations; tentative title; topic; scope; significance; research method; innovation; relation to/difference from similar publications; target audience; date of submission; and provisional table of contents (optional).

The series published an average of one volume per year for the last 5 years.
Editor-in-Chief:
Studies in Jewish History and Culture aims to present a wide spectrum of studies that cover Jewish history, society, and culture from antiquity to the present. The series seeks to highlight diversity within Judaism as well as the interaction between Jewish and non-Jewish civilizations. Encompassing all geographical areas and all periods in the history of Judaism, this series specializes in intellectual history, translations and translation process, folklore and daily life, and literature and literary theory.

The series published an average of 3,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Can studying an artist’s migration enable the reconfiguration of art history in a new and “global” mode? Michail Grobman’s odyssey in search of a contemporary idiom of Jewish art led him to cross the borders of political blocs and to observe, absorb, and confront different patterns of modernism in his work. His provocative art, his rich archives and collections, his essays and personal diaries all reveal this complexity and open up a new perspective on post-World War II twentieth-century modernism – and on the interconnected functioning of its local models.
From Europe and America to the Middle East, North Africa and other non-European Jewish settlement areas, the Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture covers the recent history of the Jewish people from 1750 through the 1950s. Originally published in German as the Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur by J.B. Metzler Verlag (Stuttgart/Weimar) in 2011 the work includes approximately 800 entries that present the state of international research and reveal a complex portrait of Jewish life - illuminated by many maps and illustrations. Central themes convey information on topics such as autonomy, exile, emancipation, literature, liturgy, music, and science of Judaism. The encyclopedia provides knowledge in an overall context and offers academics and other interested readers new insights into Jewish history and culture. The work is an outstanding contribution to the understanding of Judaism and modernity.

The first volume of the English edition will appear in 2017 with subsequent volumes following in due course. The volumes may be purchased individually as they appear or as a set once all 7 are available. Both the German and the English editions will also be available online.
This quantitative study of Piotrków Trybunalski traces the evolution of the population in the typical early modern semi-agrarian town in which the majority of activity was concentrated in the Jewish suburbs into a provincial capital in Congress Poland. Through the use of longitudinal aggregations and family reconstruction it explores fertility, mortality, and marriage patterns from the early nineteenth century, when civil records were introduced, until the Holocaust, revealing key differences as well as striking similarities between local Jews and non-Jews. The example of Piotrków set in a broader European context highlights variations in the pre-transitional demography of Ashkenazi Jewry and lack of universal model describing the “traditional” or “eastern European” Jewish family.
Volume Editors: and
This book offers a new and inclusive approach to Western exegesis up to 1100. For too long, modern scholars have examined Jewish and Christian exegesis apart from each other. This is not surprising, given how religious, social, and linguistic borders separated Jews and Christians. But they worked to a great extent on the same texts. Christians were keenly aware that they relied on translation. The contributions to this volume reveal how both sides worked on parallel tracks, posing similar questions and employing more or less the same techniques, and in some rare instances, interdependently.
David Levi: a Jewish Freemason and Saint-Simonian in Nineteenth-century Italy
In this volume, Alessandro Grazi offers the first intellectual biography of the Italian Jewish writer and politician David Levi (1816-1898). In this intriguing journey through the mysterious rites of Freemasonry and the bizarre worldviews of Saint-Simonianism, you can discover Levi’s innovative interpretation of Judaism and its role in modernity. As a champion of dialogue with Catholic intellectuals, Levi’s importance transcends the Jewish world. The second part of the book presents an unpublished document, Levi’s comedy “Il Mistero delle Tre Melarancie”, a phantasmagorical adventure in search of his Jewish identity, with an English translation of its most relevant excerpt.