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This book addresses the negotiation of categorizations in colonial societies in Spanish America from a new vantage point: fiscality. In early modern empires (poll) taxes were a significant factor to organize and perpetuate social inequalities. By this, fiscal categorizations had very concrete effects on the daily life of the categorized, on their assets and on their labor force. They intersected with social categorizations such as gender, profession, age and what many authors have termed race or ethnicity, but which is denominated here, more accurately with a term from the sources, calidad. They were imposed by legislation from above and contested via petitions from below, the latter being a type of source scarcely analyzed until now.
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Arab Traders in their Own Words explores for the first time the largest unified corpus of merchant correspondence to have survived from the Ottoman period. The writers chosen for this first volume were mostly Christian merchants who traded within a network that connected the Syrian and Egyptian provinces and extended from Damascus in the North to Alexandria in the South with particular centers in Jerusalem and Damietta. They lived through one of the most turbulent intersections of Ottoman and European imperial history, the 1790s and early 1800s, and had to navigate their fortunes through diplomacy, culture, and commerce. Besides an edition of more than 190 letters in colloquial Arabic this volume also offers a profound introductory study.
Memory is always moving ‒ between the individual and the collective, the local and the (trans)national, the past, the present, and the future. Remembering simultaneously creates and reveals connections across cultural, sociopolitical, and epistemological spheres. Such entanglements can be uneven or ambivalent in nature. Recent approaches frame and understand memory discourses as mobile, with the potential to mobilize individual and collective agency to serve diverging political ends.

Memory studies, consolidated as a field of research over the past few decades, remains a vibrant intellectual and political project, particularly since broadening its conceptual and contextual horizons beyond the received paradigms of nation, region, and culture. Responding to this development, the editors of this series are particularly interested in projects that adopt a comparative approach, bringing postcolonial, migration, transregional, social movement, and performance studies into dialogue with memory studies. In this vein, we welcome scholarly work which explores memory in relation to postcoloniality, transculturality, and intersectionality, as well as projects that interrogate how memories can be a resource for the future which they inevitably shape.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals for manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
In the past decades, the world has watched the rise of China as an economic and military power and the emergence of Chinese transnational elites. What may seem like an entirely new phenomenon marks the revival of a trend initiated at the end of the Qing. The redistribution of power, wealth and knowledge among the newly formed elites matured during the Republican period.
This volume demonstrates both the difficulty and the value of re-thinking the elites in modern China. It establishes that the study of the dynamic tensions within the elite and among elite groups in this epochal era is within reach if we are prepared to embrace forms of historical inquiry that integrate the abundant and even limitless historical resources, and to engage with the rich repertoire of digital techniques/instruments available and question our previous research paradigms.
This renewed approach brings historical research closer to an integrative data-rich history of modern China.
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In an age characterized by religious conflict, Protestant and Catholic Augsburgers remained largely at peace. How did they do this? This book argues that the answer is in the “emotional practices” Augsburgers learned and enacted—in the home, in marketplaces and other sites of civic interaction, in the council house, and in church. Augsburg’s continued peace depended on how Augsburgers felt—as neighbors, as citizens, and believers—and how they negotiated the countervailing demands of these commitments. Drawing on police records, municipal correspondence, private memoranda, internal administrative documents and other records revealing everyday behavior, experience, and thought, Sean Dunwoody shows how Augsburgers negotiated the often-conflicting feelings of being a good believer and being a good citizen and neighbor.