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In this book, Xiong Yuezhi and a team of distinguished scholars bring together cutting-edge research on the urban history of Shanghai and the diversity of its distinctive culture. Occupying an interstitial space between Chinese and foreign power, Shanghai from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century experienced almost unimaginably complex developments in its political, social, economic, and cultural history. To untangle this complexity, Xiong and his team have carefully constructed, in thematic and chronological fashion, the interactions between the imperialist powers, foreign settlers, and the Chinese community of Shanghai from the origins of the racially-segregated International Settlement in the 1840s to the internment of foreign settlers in Shanghai during World War II in the 1940s.
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In this book Peer Vries is the first scholar to provide an extensive test of the claim that industrialization in East Asia, in particular in Japan between the Meiji Restoration and World War Two, would have been much more labour intensive than industrialization in the West. He does this by systematically comparing the role and importance of labour and capital in Japan and in a number of Western countries at a similar stage of their industrial development. He uses macro-economic data as well as specific observations by people at the time. It turns out that there is no reason to distinguish a specific labour-intensive Japanese route of industrialization. His comparative analysis provides us with a better understanding of the logic of industrialization in both West and East.
Der lateinamerikanische Staudammbau im 20. Jahrhundert als globale Wissensgeschichte
Lateinamerika avancierte im 20. Jahrhundert zu einem wichtigen Hotspot des weltweiten Staudammbaus. Anhand von Beispielen aus Brasilien, Mexiko, Venezuela und Uruguay wird gezeigt, dass viele Länder der Region Wissenszentren aus einheimischen Ingenieuren, Firmen und Behörden aufbauten, die ab den 1960er Jahren die damals weltweit größten Talsperren errichteten, darunter den venezolanischen Guri-Damm und den brasilianischen Tucuruí-Damm. Die neu formierten technischen Eliten konnten mit ihren Wissensbeständen globale Machtverhältnisse herausfordern, vor allem die Technologieabhängigkeit zum globalen Norden. Talsperren waren in entwicklungspolitische Vorstellungen eingebunden und sollten wirtschaftliches Wachstum entfachen. Die ambivalenten Erfahrungen Lateinamerikas mit dieser Entwicklungspolitik, aber auch mit Umweltzerstörung und zivilgesellschaftlichem Widerstand trugen zur sich global ändernden Wahrnehmung von Talsperren bei.
Saying that horses shaped the medieval world – and the way we see it today – is hardly an exaggeration. Why else do we imagine a medieval knight – or a nomadic warrior – on horseback? Why do we use such metaphors as “unbridled” or “bearing a yoke” in our daily language? Studies of medieval horses and horsemanship are increasingly popular, but they often focus on a single aspect of equestrianism or a single culture. In this book, you will find information about both elite and humble working equines, about the ideology and practicalities of medieval horsemanship across different countries, from Iceland to China.
Contributors are Gloria Allaire, Luise Borek, Gail Brownrigg, Agnès Carayon, Gavina Cherchi, John C. Ford, Loïs Forster, Jürg Gassmann, Rebecca Henderson, Anna-Lena Lange, Romain Lefebvre, Rena Maguire, Ana Maria S. A. Rodrigues, and Alexia-Foteini Stamouli.
Merchants and Markets in Europe, 1700-1750
The open access publication of this book has been published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.

This book examines the European commercial landscape of the early China trade, c.1700–1750. It looks at the foundational period of Sino-European commerce and explores a world of private enterprise beneath the surface of the official East India Company structures. Using rich private trade records, it analyses the making of pan-European markets, distribution networks and patterns of investment that together reveal a new geography of a trading system previously studied mostly at Canton. By considering the interloping activities of British-born merchants working for the smaller East India Companies, the book uncovers the commercial practices and cross-Company collaborations, both legal and illicit, that sustained the growth of the China trade: smuggling, wholesale trading, private commissions and the manipulation of Company auctions.
A Global Approach to Spaces, Representations and Worlds of Trade, 1500–1800
Hans Holbein’s Triumphs (1532-1534), commissioned for the headquarters of the Hanseatic League in London and Kano Naizen’s The Portuguese namban (‘foreigners’) painted in 1543 in Japan are representations of worlds of trade, where wealth, speculation, exploitation, poverty, curiosity, encounters and the exotic relate effortlessly. These worlds multiplied in Africa, the America’s, Asia and Europe as mercantile cultures met in a globalizing world. From these encounters, power, subjugation and conflict arose as part of the same world as cooperation, cross-culturalism and cosmopolitism. Understanding early modern merchant cultures is thus paramount to comprehend the sinews of globalization before 1800.

Merchants worldwide shared trading interests. These interests shaped a panoply of encounters of mercantile cultures across space and time. This book sketches the commonalities and underlines the differences of mercantile practices and representations during the Early Modern period.

Contributors are: Laurence Fontaine, David Graizbord, William Pettigrew, Edmond J. Smith, Radhika Seshan, Rila Mukherjee, Jurre J. A. Knoest, Noelle Richardson, Joseph P. McDermott, Mark Harberlëin, Francisco Bethencourt, Edgar Pereira, and Germano Maifreda.
Law-Making and Local Normativities in Iberian Asia, 1500-1800
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Norms beyond Empire seeks to rethink the relationship between law and empire by emphasizing the role of local normative production. While European imperialism is often viewed as being able to shape colonial law and government to its image, this volume argues that early modern empires could never monolithically control how these processes unfolded. Examining the Iberian empires in Asia, it seeks to look at norms as a means of escaping the often too narrow concept of law and look beyond empire to highlight the ways in which law-making and local normativities frequently acted beyond colonial rule. The ten chapters explore normative production from this perspective by focusing on case studies from China, India, Japan, and the Philippines.

Contributors are: Manuel Bastias Saavedra, Marya Svetlana T. Camacho, Luisa Stella de Oliveira Coutinho Silva, Rômulo da Silva Ehalt, Patricia Souza de Faria, Fupeng Li, Miguel Rodrigues Lourenço, Abisai Perez Zamarripa, Marina Torres Trimállez, and Ângela Barreto Xavier.