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Memory is always moving ‒ between the individual and the collective, the local and the (trans)national, the past, the present, and the future. Remembering simultaneously creates and reveals connections across cultural, sociopolitical, and epistemological spheres. Such entanglements can be uneven or ambivalent in nature. Recent approaches frame and understand memory discourses as mobile, with the potential to mobilize individual and collective agency to serve diverging political ends.

Memory studies, consolidated as a field of research over the past few decades, remains a vibrant intellectual and political project, particularly since broadening its conceptual and contextual horizons beyond the received paradigms of nation, region, and culture. Responding to this development, the editors of this series are particularly interested in projects that adopt a comparative approach, bringing postcolonial, migration, transregional, social movement, and performance studies into dialogue with memory studies. In this vein, we welcome scholarly work which explores memory in relation to postcoloniality, transculturality, and intersectionality, as well as projects that interrogate how memories can be a resource for the future which they inevitably shape.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals for manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
A Comparative Study of Four National Literary Traditions
Author:
This literary analysis of the representation of ‘Gypsies’ in juvenile literature is unique in its comparative scope, as well as in the special attention to rare pre-1850 narratives, the period in which juvenile literature developed as a specific genre. Most studies on the subject are about one national literary tradition or confined to a limited period. In this study Dutch, English, French and German texts are analysed and discussed with reference to main academic publications on the subject. Emphasis is on the rich variation in narrative presentations, rather than on an inventory of images or prejudices. An important topic is the fundamental difference between early English and German narratives. Important because of the wide dissemination of German stories.
Author:
The focus of this volume is on political discourse about the pattern and desirability of economic development, and how/why historical interpretations of social phenomena connected to this systemic process alter. It is a trajectory pursued here with reference to the materialism of Marxism, via the mid-nineteenth century ideas about race, through the development decade, the ‘cultural turn’, debates about modes of production and their respective labour regimes, culminating in the role played by immigration before and after the Brexit referendum. Also examined is the trajectory followed by travel writing, and how many of its core assumptions overlap with those made in the social sciences and development studies. The object is to account for the way concepts informing these trajectories do or do not alter.
Artisan Mobility, Innovation, and the Circulation of Knowledge in Premodern Europe
Volume Editor:
Artisans travelled all over Europe in the pre-modern period, and they were responsible for many technical innovations and new consumer products. This volume moves away from the model of knowledge ‘transfer’ and, drawing on new understandings of artisan work, considers the links between artisan creativity and mobility. Through case studies of different industries, it emphasizes traditions of migration, the experience of moving, and the stimulus provided by new economic and work environments. For both male and female artisans, the weight of these factors varied from one trade to another, and from place to place.
Flemish Art and Artists in Seventeenth-Century Madrid
In Painting Flanders Abroad: Flemish Art and Artists in Seventeenth-Century Madrid, Flemish immigrants and imported Flemish paintings cross the paths of Spanish kings, collectors, dealers, and artists in the Spanish court city, transforming the development and nature of seventeenth-century Spanish painting. Examining these Flemish transplants and the traces their interactions left in archival documents, collection inventories, art treatises, and most saliently Spanish “Golden Age” paintings, this book portrays Spanish society grappling with a long tradition of importing its favorite paintings while struggling to reimagine its own visual idiom. In the process, the book historicizes questions of style, quality, immigration, mobility, identity, and cultural exchange to define what the evolving and amorphous visual concept of “Flemishness” meant to Spanish viewers in an era long before the emergence of nationalism.
From Acceptable Undesirables to Respected Businessmen
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This is the first book in English to discuss the changing attitudes of the Chilean Right toward Jewish immigrants and the State of Israel from the 1930s onwards. Jewish Chileans have ascended rapidly from the status of undesirable immigrants to middle and upper-middle class, facing less obstacles than their Argentine coreligionists. Particular emphasis is given to the failed struggle to extradite war criminal Walther Rauff and to the years of the military dictatorship headed by General Augusto Pinochet. By the 1970s, Israel seemed a strong pro-Western barrier to the expansion of communism and Islamic fundamentalism.
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This book deals with how, starting in the 1960s, immigrant groups in Israel constructed their ethnic identity by reviving their ethnic festivals and turning them into part of Israeli society. For the immigrants, these festivals serve as a collective “definitional ceremony,” with an intersection of ethnicity, culture, and identity. They also help them to develop cultural and religious syncretism. The discussion of their social and political leaders’ ethnic activism provides important insights about the ways in which immigrant leaders employ their ethnic tradition as a resource for mobilizing cultural, social, and political capital that will facilitate their penetration of the cultural mainstream.
This volume presents Greek Maritime History and unravels the historical trajectory of a maritime nation par excellence in the Eastern Mediterranean. At the core of the book lies the rise of the Greek merchant fleet and its transformation from a peripheral to an international carrier. Following the evolution of Greek shipping for more than three centuries (17th-20th century), the book traces a maritime nation in its making and provides proof of a different, yet successful pattern of maritime development compared to other European maritime nations. The chapters adopt a multidimensional and interdisciplinary approach – spanning from shipping, fishing and trade to piracy, technology, human resources and entrepreneurship – and reflect the main directions of Greek maritime historiography over the last thirty years.

Contributors are: Apostolos Delis, Dimitris Dimitropoulos, Zisis Fotakis, Katerina Galani, Gelina Harlaftis, Evdokia Olympitou, Gerassimos D. Pagratis, Alexandra Papadopoulou, Socrates Petmezas, Evrydiki Sifneos, Anna Sydorenko, Ioannis Theotokas, and Katerina Vourkatioti.