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Starting in Louisiana in the early nineteenth century, this book takes the reader on a journey through the USA and the development of their civil codes. From Georgia and New York, civil codes traveled to California and Dakota Territory; in the Great Plains, they made their way to Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota by the end of the century.
Unveiling the history of nineteenth-century civil codes in the USA, this book examines their origin stories, circulation, and usage by focusing on the social-historical context of their drafting and legal concepts.

“Rocheton's work, published four decades after Cook's book on ‘The American Codification Movement,’ contains an exhaustive and insightful analysis of nineteenth-century civil codes. It thoroughly discusses their context, how they were conceived, discussed, drafted and approved, their main foreign influences and content, and their practical operation." - Aniceto Masferrer, University of Valencia

“While there is a vast corpus of literature on codification and, more specifically, civil codes in the civil law tradition, it is much less known that six US states codified their private laws during the 19th century. This book tells the fascinating story. Spoiler alert: it’s a family affair.” - Stefan Vogenauer, Max Planck Institute for Legal History and Legal Theory
Natural law changed its character in the post-Reformation period, mainly because it became an academic discipline. This institutionalisation happened first in Protestant countries but increasingly also in Catholic areas. In the hands of philosophers and jurists rather than theologians the subject served a wide variety of purposes in domestic, colonial, imperial and international politics, in judicial administration, legislation and reform, in social analysis and in the inculcation of social ethics. Although concerned with the foundations of morality, law and politics, early modern natural law was far from a coherent philosophical theory, but rather the framework for fundamental disputes. What kind of natural law was adopted in a given place and period was often a matter of local controversy in state, church and university. At the same time, natural law was characterised by extensive transnational networks.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editors or the Publisher at Brill, Alessandra Giliberto.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Series Editor:
This Open Access book series is published in conjunction with the Max Planck Institute for Legal History and Legal Theory.

The volumes published in the Max Planck Studies in Global Legal History of the Iberian Worlds deal with legal-historical research on areas that interacted with the Iberian empires during the early modern and modern periods in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa. The focus of this series is global in the sense that it does not just limit itself to imperial spaces as such, but also looks at the globalisation of norms within the spaces that were in contact with these imperial formations. The global dimension is, moreover, underscored by the attention paid to the coexistence of a variety of normativities and their cultural translations at different times and in different places. The volumes thus decentre traditional research perspectives and are open to exploring various modes of normativity.

All of the monographs, edited volumes and text editions in the series are peer reviewed and published in print and online. Brill’s Open Access books are distributed free of charge in Brill’s E-Book Collections and can be found via DOAB, OAPEN and JSTOR.
Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the Publisher at Brill Alessandra Giliberto.

Editor:
This series looks at law and its literature, as well as legal practice and its context from the 6th to the 16th centuries. It provides a forum for scholarship – original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources, translations – in the fields of legal history, historical anthropology, social and cultural history, material culture, political and economic history, church history, dispute studies, and the history of rhetoric, aiming to build a bridge between the history of law and other fields in medieval studies. It will accept studies on Roman and canon law, common law, customary law, and Jewish and Islamic law.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor, Professor John Hudson, or the Publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Volume Editors: and
This comprehensive volume offers fresh insights on Latin American and Caribbean law before European contact, during the colonial and early republican eras and up to the present. It considers the history of legal education, the legal profession, Indigenous legal history, and the legal history concerning Africans and African Americans, other enslaved peoples, women, immigrants, peasants, and workers. This book also examines the various legal frameworks concerning land and other property, commerce and business, labor, crime, marriage, family and domestic conflicts, the church, the welfare state, constitutional law and rights, and legal pluralism. It serves as a current introduction for those new to the field and provides in-depth interpretations, discussions, and bibliographies for those already familiar with the region’s legal history.

Contributors are: Diego Acosta, Alejandro Agüero, Sarah C. Chambers, Robert J. Cottrol, Oscar Cruz Barney, Mariana Dias Paes, Tamar Herzog, Marta Lorente Sariñena, M.C. Mirow, Jerome G. Offner, Brian Owensby, Juan Manuel Palacio, Agustín Parise, Rogelio Pérez-Perdomo, Heikki Pihlajamäki, Susan Elizabeth Ramírez, Timo H. Schaefer, William Suárez-Potts, Victor M. Uribe-Uran, Cristián Villalonga, Alex Wisnoski, and Eduardo Zimmermann.
From Antiquity to the Twentieth Century
This volume offers an extensive introduction to Western legal traditions from antiquity to the twentieth century. Drawing from a variety of scholarly writings, both in English and in translation, thirteen leading scholars present the current state of western legal history research and pave the way for new debates and future study. This is the ideal sourcebook for graduate students, as it enables them to approach the key questions of the field in an accessible way.

Contributors are: Aniceto Masferrer, C.H. (Remco) van Rhee, Seán P. Donlan, Stephan Dusil, Gerald Schwedler, Jean-Louis Halpérin, Jan Hallebeek, Agustín Parise, Heikki Pihlajamäki, Dirk Heirbaut, Bernd Kannowski, Adolfo Giuliani, Olivier Moréteau, and Jacques Vanderlinden.