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Series Editors: and
The book series Studies in Religion and the Arts promotes the development of discourses for exploring the religious dimensions of the verbal, visual and performing arts. The goal of the series is to form an international and multi-disciplinary forum for the scholarly discussion on the expression of religious sentiments in art.

The series has published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Author:
Andrea Fulvio’s Illustrium imagines and the Beginnings of Classical Archaeology is a study of the book recognized by contemporaries as the first attempt (1517) to publish artifacts from Classical Antiquity in the form of a chronology of portraits appearing on coins. By studying correspondences between the illustrated coins and genuine, ancient coins, Madigan parses Fulvio’s methodology, showing how he attempted to exploit coins as historical documents. Situated within humanist literary and historical studies of ancient Rome, his numismatic project required visual artists closely to study and assimilate the conventions of ancient portraiture. The Illustrium imagines exemplifies the range and complexity of early modern responses to ancient artifacts.
Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts presents extended reference articles on topics within the comprehensive field of world religions and the arts, from the traditional fine arts to newer fields of visual culture and material culture. References will be hyperlinked to original source materials when possible, offering both scholars and students the opportunity to stay current with the literature or to begin their research. Written as a single-author monograph with accompanying critical bibliography, each 50 to 100 page article provides an overview of the specific topic, its history within the larger discipline of religion and the arts, recent innovations in scholarship, critical commentary, and the unique analysis of the author's perspectives.
Published under auspices of the Dutch University Institute for Art History (NIKI) in Florence, the NIKI series publishes collections of essays and monographs on Italian art, Dutch and Flemish art, and artists in Italy. It has a particular emphasis on the rich tradition of artistic exchange and mutual influence between Italy and the North.

Until 2015 this series was published by Centro Di (Florence). Volumes 1-11 can be obtained from Centro Di.

Series Editor: Michael W. Kwakkelstein, NIKI, Florence
Presenting medieval Pisa in a multidisciplinary study, A Companion to Medieval Pisa provides a comprehensive overview of the city at the time of its greatest fame and prosperity. The volume addresses central aspects of the city’s history: its geomorphology and orientation towards the Mediterranean Sea; its ancient past; the archaeological basis for the study of the medieval city and its built environment; Pisa’s urban and port infrastructure; its social organization and political and economic history; its cultural achievements in the visual and literary arts; and the legacy of the medieval past for the city today.

Contributors are: David Abulafia, Monica Bini, Veronica Rossi, Stefano Bruni, Antonio Alberti, Gabriele Gattiglia, Alma Poloni, Giuseppe Petralia, Gabriella Garzella, Ewa Karwacka Codini, Cédric Quertier, Michele Campopiano, Michel Balard, Fabio Redi, Olimpia Vaccari, Mauro Ronzani, Maria Luisa Ceccarelli Lemut, Ottavio Banti, Marco Collareta, Karen Rose Mathews, Cristina Cagianelli, and Franco Cardini.
Volume Editors: and
Premodern architecture and built environments were fluid spaces whose configurations and meanings were constantly adapting and changing. The production of transitory meaning transpired whenever a body or object moved through these dynamic spaces. Whether spanning the short duration of a procession or the centuries of a building’s longue durée, a body or object in motion created in-the-moment narratives that unfolded through time and space. The authors in this volume forge new approaches to architectural studies by focusing on the interaction between monuments, artworks, and their viewers at different points in space and time.

Contributors are Christopher A. Born, Elizabeth Carson Pastan, Nicole Corrigan, Gillian B. Elliott, Barbara Franzé, Anne Heath, Philip Jacks, Divya Kumar-Dumas, Brigitte Kurmann-Schwarz, Ashley J. Laverock, Susan Leibacher Ward, Elodie Leschot, Meghan Mattsson McGinnis, Michael Sizer, Kelly Thor, and Laura J. Whatley.
Volume Editors: and
This volume unites a team of distinguished scholars from France, Germany, Italy, the UK, and the USA to celebrate Rosalind B. Brooke’s immense contribution to Franciscan studies over the last 60 years. It is divided into four sections, beginning with an appraisal of Dr Brooke’s influence upon Franciscan studies. The second section contains a series of historical studies and expressions of the Franciscan spirit. Hagiographical studies occupy the third section, reflecting the friars’ ministry and the thirst for the renewal of the Franciscan vision. The fourth part explores the art and iconographical images of St. Francis and his friars. These innovative studies reflect new insights into and interpretations of Franciscan life in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are (n order of appearance) Michael W. Blastic, O.F.M., Maria Pia Alberzoni, Bert Roest, Michael F. Cusato, O.F.M., Jens Röhrkasten, David Luscombe, Luigi Pellegrini. Peter Murray Jones, Maria Teresa Dolso, Michael J.P. Robson, André Vauchez, David Burr, William R. Cook, Nigel Morgan, and Kathleen Giles Arthur.
Usable Pasts addresses projects dating to two periods in the United States that saw increased financial support from the state for socially engaged culture. By analysing artworks dating to the 1990s by Suzanne Lacy, Rick Lowe and Martha Rosler in relation to experimental theatre, modern dance, and photography produced within the leftist Cultural Front of the 1930s, this book unpicks the mythic and material afterlives of the New Deal in American cultural politics in order to write a new history of social practice art in the United States. From teenage mothers organising exhibitions that challenged welfare reform, to communist dance troupes choreographing their struggles as domestic workers, Usable Pasts addresses the aesthetics and politics of these attempts to transform society through art in relation to questions of state formation.
Art, Material Culture, and British-Russian Relations
Volume Editor:
“Courtly Gifts and Cultural Diplomacy” explores the history of British-Russian state relations from the perspective of art and material culture. This richly illustrated book presents manifold practices of courtly gift-giving and vivid case studies of British-Russian artistic diplomacy over the centuries. It traces a visual and material history of cross-cultural dialogue that starts with an early English map of Russia made in the 16th century and ends with gifts of Fabergé art objects and domestic photographs exchanged between the British royal family and the family of Tsar Nicholas II in late Imperial Russia. Twelve expert authors from academia, the arts, and the museum sectors in Britain, Russia, and the United States present new narratives and critical interpretations based on material from previously unexplored archives. Their diverse approaches reveal the importance of artistic diplomacy and the agency of gifts of art and material culture in courtly and state relations.