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A peer-reviewed forum for interdisciplinary studies in history of human and nature relations, using primarily historical methodologies, covering changes in the biological and physical environments, views of nature and what they say about a society, and political environmental history. The scope includes historical and archaeological studies and the history of ideas and medicine. The chronology is wide: a world perspective is taken.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to the series editor Dr. Aleks Pluskowski (University of Reading, U.K.). For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.
Brill’s book series Science and Religion in East Asia features scholarly monographs and edited volumes, focusing on the question of how human understanding of the world and its application to various fields of socio-cultural life in East Asian societies were shaped in the context of religious thought and practices, notably those of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism.
Recent scholarship on the history of European science in medieval and early modern periods has shown that society’s scientific endeavor was inextricably intertwined with spiritual and moral pursuits, classified in modern times as a separate category called "religion". The rich resources in East Asia on both scientific pursuits and moral-religious teachings, enable us to examine the fine texture of relations woven in the course of the continuous interchange of aims, methods, and knowledge between these scientific and moral-religious enterprises.
A special emphasis is put on the relation between science and what is called Confucianism, the most common and dominant thread of thought in East Asian societies. Science and Confucianism developed form and content to a considerable degree under the influence of ideas and techniques from Daoist and Buddhist traditions. From the sixteenth century onwards, they also interacted with Western science that had been developed in Europe dominated by Christianity. Science and Religion in East Asia pays ample attention to the role of these other religions present in East Asia as well and the interaction with other regions of the world.

Editor / Translator:
ʿAlī ibn Sahl Rabban aṭ-Ṭabarī's Indian Books, completed in the year 850 CE as an appendix to his medico-philosophical chef-d'œuvre "Paradise of Wisdom", belong to the most remarkable texts in Arabic scientific literature. The Indian Books offer a unique, interpretative summary of the main tenets of Ayurvedic medicine, as understood by Arabic-speaking scholars on the basis of now lost translations from Sanskrit. The present book centres around a critical edition and annotated translation of this crucial text, framed by a detailed introduction and extensive glossaries of terms. Ṭabarī's learned exposé of Ayurveda also throws a more nuanced light on the allegedly uncontested supremacy of Greek humoralism in 9th-century Arabic medicine.
Artisan Mobility, Innovation, and the Circulation of Knowledge in Premodern Europe
Volume Editor:
Artisans travelled all over Europe in the pre-modern period, and they were responsible for many technical innovations and new consumer products. This volume moves away from the model of knowledge ‘transfer’ and, drawing on new understandings of artisan work, considers the links between artisan creativity and mobility. Through case studies of different industries, it emphasizes traditions of migration, the experience of moving, and the stimulus provided by new economic and work environments. For both male and female artisans, the weight of these factors varied from one trade to another, and from place to place.
Volume Editors: and
Why write a book about science, technology, and medicine in Lisbon? No one questions the value of similar studies of European capital cities such as Paris or London, but they are not reflective of the norm. Alongside its unique characteristics, Lisbon more closely represents the rule and deserves attention as such. This book offers the first urban history of science, technology and medicine in Lisbon, 1840–1940. It addresses the hybrid character of a European port city, scientific capital and imperial metropolis. It discusses the role of science, technology, and medicine in the making of Lisbon, framed by the analysis of invisibilities, urban connections, and techno-scientific imaginaries. The book is accompanied by a virtual interactive map.
Volume 2 of the two-volume set MITS 56: In 1508, Johannes Trithemius, the Black Abbot, dedicated his Polygraphia, a treatise on writing in ciphers, to Emperor Maximilian I, personally handing over an elaborate autograph. Unlike the editio princeps, which was to be printed a decade later, the manuscript retains the arcane and mysterious tone of the bibliophile scholar’s earlier works on the subject. This book offers the first critical edition and translation of this first version, together with an extensive commentary illuminating the numerous obscure allusions, the impressive literary knowledge of its author, and the genesis of the mechanisms discussed.