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The single most important imperative of contemporary linguistics is to document, describe, and analyze endangered languages and other lesser-known languages and dialects. This open access, peer-reviewed series publishes titles on poorly studied languages and dialects around the world, and especially welcomes contributions on languages of Japan and the rest of the Asia-Pacific region. Single and multi-authored monographs discussing a single language or multiple languages are welcome, as well as thematic collections of contributions by various scholars. Authors not affiliated with the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics (NINJAL) or with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (UHM) are encouraged to apply for open access funding with their own institutions or with relevant private or governmental funding organizations. Information about open access publishing with Brill may be found here.

Interested scholars may contact the Acquisition Editor at Brill, Dr Uri Tadmor. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Elisa Perotti.
Grammatical Sketches of Japanese Dialects and Ryukyuan Languages
Volume Editor:
Japanese is definitely one of the best-known languages in typological literature. For example, typologists often assume that Japanese is a nominative-accusative language. However, it is often overlooked that Japanese, or more precisely, Tokyo Japanese, is just one of various local varieties of the Japonic language family (Japanese and Ryukyuan). In fact, the Japonic languages exhibit a surprising typological diversity. For example, some varieties display a split-intransitive as opposed to nominative-accusative system. The present volume is thus a unique attempt to explore the typological diversity of Japonic by providing a collection of grammatical sketches of various local varieties, four from Japanese dialects and five from Ryukyuan. Each grammatical sketch follows the same descriptive format, addressing a wide range of typological topics.
This peer-reviewed series publishes concise books in all areas of general and applied linguistics. The series welcomes manuscripts consisting of state-of-the-art overviews as well research monographs, long research articles. Both senior and junior scholars from anywhere in the world and working on any linguistic topic are welcome to submit their manuscripts.
Interested scholars may contact the Acquisition Editor at Brill, Dr Uri Tadmor. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Elisa Perotti.
Author:
As an intriguing but little understood language group within the Tibeto-Burman family, Qiangic languages are widely reported to have evidentiality, the grammatical means of expressing information source. How does this category function in this language group? Does it show any common features across these languages? And does it have any unique properties? Drawing on data from over a dozen languages and dialects, and cast within an informative typological framework, this study is the first attempt to answer these questions. It is found that evidentiality in Qiangic languages can be classified into three broad types. The study further demonstrates that modern systems cannot be inherited from Proto-Qiangic, and it also reveals certain features of the reported evidential that seem to be typologically rare.
This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of Africa. The aim of the series is to improve the documentation of hitherto poorly described or undescribed African languages by publishing comprehensive, high-quality grammars. Ideally, these latter will include a basic lexicon and appendix of glossed texts. In addition, grammars or sketches of hitherto undescribed dialects of better-known languages are welcomed. We encourage a unifying typological approach, so that these volumes are accessible and intelligible to the wider linguistic readership. Special preference will be given to descriptions of typologically or genetically interesting languages and studies resulting from language documentation projects. Authors are expected to follow Leipzig glossing rules and IPA conventions. The editor may specify the TOC structure and the list of abbreviations; these will be discussed with authors at the book proposal stage.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editor will work with authors to ensure high standards. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.
This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of mainland and insular South East Asia, and is open to all language families of the area: Austroasiatic, Hmong-Mien, Tai-Kadai, Tibeto-Burman, Austronesian and Andamanese. Contributions can come from a range of sources, including: dissertations, field notes, and reworkings of extant studies. Ideally they will include a basic lexicon and appendix of glossed texts. For print volumes we prefer at least 200 printed book pages, these can include multiple short sketches forming coherent volumes. Shorter works as stand-alone publications can be presented as e-editions. Media files (images, audio, video) can be included in e-editions or as links in print volumes (subject to copyright considerations).

We encourage a unifying typological approach, so that these volumes are both accessible to typologists coming from different theoretical backgrounds and intelligible to the wider linguistic readership. Authors are expected to follow Leipzig glossing rules and IPA conventions. The editors may specify the TOC structure and the list of abbreviations; these will be discussed with authors at the book proposal stage.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editors will work with authors to ensure high standards. We seek to build a diverse and highly qualified Advisory Board; interested scholars should contact the editors. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.
Romance languages have come to play a central role within general linguistics over the last years. Many minor varieties have attracted the interest of scholars, and this has led to the proliferation of articles and books on Romance. While the understanding of various phenomena in the Romance languages has seen many advances, the documentation side has slowed down significantly. Minor Romance languages are less and less documented, both because of a lack of funds and because they are steadily being replaced by standard languages. Those linguists that still dedicate time and effort towards documenting and describing non-standard Romance varieties are often unable to find a venue to publish their work.
A series on the grammars of Romance languages has been long a desideratum among the linguistic community. The Romance subseries of Brill's series Grammars and Sketches of the World’s Languages finally offers a proper venue for such valuable studies, which will appeal to Romance scholars and students working on Romance, as well as linguists keen to discover information about the numerous Romance varieties that are spoken todays in Europe and the Americas.
The series features books on synchronic and diachronic grammars, the phonology, morphology, and syntax of one or more Romance languages. While these grammars can be theoretically informed, this series does not feature specific theoretical analyses of language phenomena, but aims to be accessible to a broad audience. Theoretical tools are thus welcome, but do not constitute the main aim of the series.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editor will work with authors to ensure high standards. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.
Dolgan is a severely endangered Turkic language spoken in the extreme north of the Russian Federation which has undergone noticeable substrate influence and thus exhibits grammatical structures differing from other Turkic languages. The grammar at hand is the first fully-fledged grammar of Dolgan in English language: It describes the Dolgan language system from an internal perspective basing on corpus data of natural Dolgan speech. It takes historical, comparative and typological perspectives, if applicable, but refrains from pertaining to a particular linguistic theory. Consequently, both Turcologists and general linguists can make use of it independently from their individual research question.
What is the relationship between spatial and temporal representations in language and cognition? What is the role of culture in this relationship? I enter this discussion by offering a community-based, cross-generational study on the community of speakers of aṣ-Ṣāniʿ Arabic, members of a Negev Desert Bedouin tribe in Israel. The book presents the results of ten years of fieldwork, the linguistic and cognitive profiles of three generations, and first-hand narration of a century of history, from nomadism to sedentarism, between conservation, resilience, and change. Linguistic and cognitive representations change with lifestyle, culture, and relationships with nature and landscape. Language changes more rapidly than cognitive structures, and the relationship between spatial and temporal representations is complex and multifaceted.
Author:
This book is the very first comprehensive description of the Arabic variety spoken in the South-Western Iranian province of Khuzestan. It contains a detailed description of its phonology and morphology with numerous examples and a collection of authentic texts presented in transcription with an English translation. The author uses a corpus-based method for the grammatical analysis relying on original data collected during fieldwork in Khuzestan as well as among other Khuzestani Arab communities in Kuwait and Austria. The introduction and text collection offer the reader insights into Khuzestani Arab culture and traditions. The book highlights the peripheral character of Khuzestani Arabic spoken as a minority dialect in Iran and isolated from influence by both Standard Arabic and regional prestige varieties. It also provides an in-depth description of the linguistic development of Ahvaz, Khuzestan’s capital city.