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This series is dedicated to the development and promotion of linguistically informed study of the Bible in its original languages. Biblical studies has greatly benefited from modern theoretical and applied linguistics, but stands poised to benefit from further integration of the two fields of study. Most linguistics has studied contemporary languages, and attempts to apply linguistic methods to the study of ancient languages requires systematic re-assessment of their approaches. This series is designed to address such challenges, by providing a venue for linguistically based analysis of the languages of the Bible. As a result, monograph-length studies and collections of essays in the major areas of linguistics, such as syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse analysis and text linguistics, corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, comparative linguistics, and the like, will be encouraged, and any theoretical linguistic approach will be considered, both formal and functional. Primary consideration is given to the Greek of the New and Old Testaments and of other relevant ancient authors, but studies in Hebrew, Coptic, and other related languages will be entertained as appropriate.

The series has published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
This volume focuses on the different challenges of language policy in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Each of the seventeen chapters follows the same structure, ensuring readability and accessibility, and describes the unique aspects of each country. The work as a whole reveals the complex and reciprocal relations between multiple indigenous African languages, Creole languages and former colonial languages and it constitutes an opportunity to notice recurring patterns as well as distinctive characteristics.
Therefore, everyone involved in language policy, education, economics and development, geography, development or area studies and African studies will benefit from such a holistic and innovative overview.
Digital discourse has become a widespread way of communicating worldwide, WhatsApp being one of the most popular Instant Messaging tools. This book offers a critical state-of-the-art review of WhatsApp linguistic studies. After evaluating a wide range of sources, seeking to identify relevant works, two major thematic domains were found. On the one hand, references addressing WhatsApp linguistic characteristics: status notifications, multimodal elements such as emojis or memes, language variation, among others. On the other, the volume offers an overview of references describing the use of WhatsApp to learn English as a foreign or second language (EFL/ESL). The author provides a broad critical review of previous works to date, which has enabled her to detect areas of research still unexplored.
Motion towards Maximal Proximity and Higher Status
Author:
Oscar E. Jiménez opens up the multi-dimensional implications of Ephesians 2:11-22 for narrative and theological analysis, demonstrating that each metaphor in the text blends and creates a single, complex narrative. Concentric spatial places construct the text’s landscape on which the Gentiles move, each place representing increasing intimacy and familiarity through national, familial, architectural, and cultic images. Christ is the vehicle of that motion, and also the agent, breaking down walls and abolishing enmity, and ultimately building the structure as both builder and cornerstone. This will be an important book for New Testament scholars and scholars interested in the use of linguistics in Biblical studies, in particular literary and narrative analysis to the New Testament epistles.
Volume Editors: and
If there’s a domain in linguistics which complexity calls for ever further research, it’s clearly that of tense, aspect, modality and evidentiality, often referred to as ‘TAME’. The reason for which these domains of investigation have been connected so tightly as to deserve a common label is that their actual intertwining is so dense that one can hardly measure their effects purely individually, without regard to the other notions of the spectrum. On the other hand, despite their imbrications, tense, aspect, modality and evidentiality remain – needless to say – separate theoretical entities. The papers gathered in this volume cover a range of issues and a variety of methods that help delineate, each in its way, new perspectives on this broad domain.
Volume Editors: and
Si le temps occupe une place aussi centrale dans la discussion linguistique, et depuis si longtemps, c’est parce que ce sujet – avec ses sujets-frères que sont l’aspect, la modalité et l’évidentialité – est non seulement riche et complexe mais aussi profondément enraciné dans la langue, se manifestant à tous ses niveaux et dans une quantité importante de contextes de réflexion.
Les articles recueillis dans ce volume se présentent à premier abord comme des études spécifiques sur des phénomènes précis, mais il s’avère rapidement que, de par sa nature, le sujet ‘temps’ ne peut pas être abordé de manière « isolée », puisqu'il parcourt la langue comme un système étendu, sans qu’on puisse en dessiner les limites avec clarté.

The reason why tense has occupied such a central place in linguistic discussion, and has done so for so long, is that this topic - along with its related topics aspect, modality and evidentiality - is not only rich and complex but also deeply rooted in language, manifesting itself at all its levels and in a significant number of contexts. The contributions collected in this volume appear at first sight as specific studies of specific phenomena, but it soon becomes clear that, by its very nature, the subject of 'time' cannot be approached in 'isolation', since it runs through the language as a pervasive system, without its boundaries being clearly defined.
The electronic version of the Utrecht Studies in Language and Communication series.

The Utrecht Studies in Language and Communication series publishes monographs as well as edited volumes on research on communication and language use. The series focuses on language use in specific social and cultural settings, expressly including the pragmatics of multilingualism, investigating the relation between discourse characteristics and the effectivity of the communication.
Research draws upon a cooperation between such diverse disciplines as text linguistics, discourse analysis, ethnography of communication, speech act theory, functional pragmatics, cognitive linguistics, educational linguistics, cognitive psychology and anthropology.

Published volumes report developments in academic and applied research on:
• the functional quality of texts and text features in view of the specific goals and the addressees of professional and educational institutions
• the relationship between discourse, identity and context in specific and changing social and cultural settings, including different modes of multilingual and multicultural interactions (e.g. lingua franca, lingua receptiva or code-switching)
• the acquisition of second, third and foreign languages in educational settings, specifically paying attention to the pragmatics in a multilingual society
• the cognitive basis of discourse processing in continuously changing contexts, and the skills underlying goal-directed language use in familiar as well as novel situations
This collection contains the electronic version of the following volumes published in this series: Volume 1 up to and including Volume 35.
Temporal and Geographical Dynamics of Theorization
Volume Editors: and
In The Situatedness of Translation Studies, Luc van Doorslaer and Ton Naaijkens critically reassess some outdated views about Translation Studies, and demonstrate that translation theory is far more diverse than its usual representation as a Western scholarly tradition arising from the 1970s onwards. They present ten chapters about lesser-known conceptualizations of translation and translation theory in various cultural contexts, such as Chinese, Estonian, Greek, Russian and Ukrainian. This book shows that so-called ‘modern’ arguments about translation practice encompassing much more than a linguistic phenomenon, can, in fact, be dated back and connected to several precursors, such as semiotics or transfer theory. In doing so, it theorizes and localizes discussions about perceptions of translation and Translation Studies as a discipline.

Contributors: Yves Gambier, Iryna Odrekhivska, Elin Sütiste & Silvi Salupere, Shaul Levin, Feng Cui, Natalia Kamovnikova, Anastasia Shakhova, George Floros & Simos Grammenidis, Anne Lange, Luc van Doorslaer & Ton Naaijkens.
The chapters collected in the volume Passives Cross-Linguistically provide analyses of passive constructions across different languages and populations from the interface perspectives between syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. The contributions are, in principle, all based on the background of generative grammatical theory. In addition to the theoretical contributions of the first part of this volume, all solidly built on rich empirical bases, some experimental works are presented, which explore passives from a psycholinguistic perspective based on theoretical insights. The languages/language families covered in the contributions include South Asian languages (Odia/Indo-Aryan and Telugu/Dravidian, but also Kharia/Austro-Asiatic), Japanese, Arabic, English, German, Modern Greek, and several modern Romance varieties (Catalan, Romanian, and especially southern Italian dialects) as well as Vedic Sanskrit and Ancient Greek.