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The Handbook of Formosan Languages provides a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the aboriginal languages of Taiwan and of the many ways in which they have been studied. It contains reference articles as well as grammar sketches of a number of Formosan languages, including a few extinct languages, written by leading scholars inthe field.
The handbook includes up-to-date bibliographical references and indices and is illustrated with tables, maps, and other useful figures. An invaluable reference to Formosanists, Austronesianists, and typologists, it will be of interest to linguists more broadly as well.
The Handbook of Formosan Languages provides a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the aboriginal languages of Taiwan and of the many ways in which they have been studied. It contains reference articles as well as grammar sketches of a number of Formosan languages, including a few extinct languages, written by leading scholars inthe field. The handbook includes up-to-date bibliographical references and indices and is illustrated with tables, maps, and other useful figures. An invaluable reference to Formosanists, Austronesianists, and typologists, it will be of interest to linguists more broadly as well.
The Handbook of Formosan Languages provides a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the aboriginal languages of Taiwan and of the many ways in which they have been studied. It contains reference articles as well as grammar sketches of a number of Formosan languages, including a few extinct languages, written by leading scholars inthe field. The handbook includes up-to-date bibliographical references and indices and is illustrated with tables, maps, and other useful figures. An invaluable reference to Formosanists, Austronesianists, and typologists, it will be of interest to linguists more broadly as well.
The Indigenous Languages of Taiwan
The Handbook of Formosan Languages provides a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the aboriginal languages of Taiwan and of the many ways in which they have been studied. It contains reference articles as well as grammar sketches of a number of Formosan languages, including a few extinct languages, written by leading scholars inthe field. The handbook includes up-to-date bibliographical references and indices and is illustrated with tables, maps, and other useful figures. An invaluable reference to Formosanists, Austronesianists, and typologists, it will be of interest to linguists more broadly as well.
The Handbook of Formosan Languages provides a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the aboriginal languages of Taiwan and of the many ways in which they have been studied. It contains reference articles as well as grammar sketches of a number of Formosan languages, including a few extinct languages, written by leading scholars inthe field.
The handbook includes up-to-date bibliographical references and indices and is illustrated with tables, maps, and other useful figures. An invaluable reference to Formosanists, Austronesianists, and typologists, it will be of interest to linguists more broadly as well.
Volume Editors: and
What can the languages spoken today tell us about the history of their speakers? This question is crucial in insular Southeast Asia and New Guinea, where thousands of languages are spoken, but written historical records and archaeological evidence is yet lacking in most regions. While the region has a long history of contact through trade, marriage exchanges, and cultural-political dominance, detailed linguistic studies of the effects of such contacts remain limited.
This volume investigates how loanwords can prove past contact events, taking into consideration ten different regions located in the Philippines, Eastern Indonesia, Timor-Leste, and New Guinea. Each chapter studies borrowing across the borders of language families, and discusses implications for the social history of the speech communities.
The single most important imperative of contemporary linguistics is to document, describe, and analyze endangered languages and other lesser-known languages and dialects. This open access, peer-reviewed series publishes titles on poorly studied languages and dialects around the world, and especially welcomes contributions on languages of Japan and the rest of the Asia-Pacific region. Single and multi-authored monographs discussing a single language or multiple languages are welcome, as well as thematic collections of contributions by various scholars. Authors not affiliated with the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics (NINJAL) or with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (UHM) are encouraged to apply for open access funding with their own institutions or with relevant private or governmental funding organizations. Information about open access publishing with Brill may be found here.

Interested scholars may contact the Acquisition Editor at Brill, Dr Uri Tadmor. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Elisa Perotti.
Grammatical Sketches of Japanese Dialects and Ryukyuan Languages
Volume Editor:
Japanese is definitely one of the best-known languages in typological literature. For example, typologists often assume that Japanese is a nominative-accusative language. However, it is often overlooked that Japanese, or more precisely, Tokyo Japanese, is just one of various local varieties of the Japonic language family (Japanese and Ryukyuan). In fact, the Japonic languages exhibit a surprising typological diversity. For example, some varieties display a split-intransitive as opposed to nominative-accusative system. The present volume is thus a unique attempt to explore the typological diversity of Japonic by providing a collection of grammatical sketches of various local varieties, four from Japanese dialects and five from Ryukyuan. Each grammatical sketch follows the same descriptive format, addressing a wide range of typological topics.
During several decades, syntactic reconstruction has been more or less regarded as a bootless and an unsuccessful venture, not least due to the heavy criticism in the 1970s from scholars like Watkins, Jeffers, Lightfoot, etc. This fallacious view culminated in Lightfoot’s (2002: 625) conclusion: “[i]f somebody thinks that they can reconstruct grammars more successfully and in more widespread fashion, let them tell us their methods and show us their results. Then we’ll eat the pudding.” This volume provides methods for the identification of i) cognates in syntax, and ii) the directionality of syntactic change, showcasing the results in the introduction and eight articles. These examples are offered as both tastier and also more nourishing than the pudding Lightfoot had in mind when discarding the viability of reconstructing syntax.
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Volume Editor:
The book is a grammar of the Makasar language, spoken by about 2 million people in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Makasarese is a head–marking language which marks arguments on the predicate with a system of pronominal clitics, following an ergative/absolutive pattern. Full noun phrases are relatively free in order, while pre-predicate focus position which is widely used. The phonology is notable for the large number of geminate and pre–glottalised consonant sequences, while the morphology is characterised by highly productive affixation and pervasive encliticisation of pronominal and aspectual elements. The work draws heavily on literary sources reaching back more than three centuries; this tradition includes two Indic based scripts, a system based on Arabic, and various Romanised conventions.