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Connected and decompartmentalised perspectives from the Middle East and North Africa (19th-21st century)
Based on a connected, relational and multidisciplinary approach (history, ethnography, political science, and theology), Mission and Preaching tackles the notion of mission through the analysis of preaching activities and religious dynamics across Christianity, Islam and Judaism, in the Middle East and North Africa, from the late 19th century until today. The 13 chapters reveal points of contact, exchange, and circulation, considering the MENA region as a central observatory. The volume offers a new chronology of the missionary phenomenon and calls for further cross-cutting approaches to decompartmentalise it, arguing that these approaches constitute useful entry points to shed new light on religious dynamics and social transformations in the MENA region.

Contributors
Necati Alkan, Federico Alpi, Gabrielle Angey, Armand Aupiais, Katia Boissevain, Naima Bouras, Philippe Bourmaud, Gaetan du Roy, Séverine Gabry-Thienpont, Maria-Chiara Giorda, Bernard Heyberger, Emir Mahieddin, Michael Marten, Norig Neveu, Maria Chiara Rioli, Karène Sanchez Summerer, Heather Sharkey, Ester Sigillò, Sébastien Tank Storper, Emanuela Trevisan Semi, Annalaura Turiano and Vincent Vilmain.
Les princesses ottomanes à l’aune du pouvoir (XVe-XVIIIe s.)
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Les femmes ottomanes n’auraient pas leur place en politique ; recluses dans leur harem, elles passeraient leur temps en distractions superficielles ou en intrigues pernicieuses : tel est l’héritage de l’orientalisme et de l’historiographie traditionnelle. Loin de ces poncifs, cet ouvrage propose une plongée dans les cadres institutionnels et sociaux ottomans, qui commandent le spectre des interactions sociales et politiques des femmes de la cour ottomane, en prenant pour champ d’étude une figure largement ignorée de l’historiographie : les filles de sang des souverains ottomans – les sultanes.

Ottoman women would have no place in politics; recluse in their harem, they would pass their time in superficial distractions or in pernicious intrigues: such is the heritage of Orientalism and traditional historiography. Far from these clichés, this work offers a dive into the Ottoman institutional and social frameworks, which govern the spectrum of social and political interactions of the women of the Ottoman court, taking as a field of study a figure largely ignored by historiography: the blood daughters of the Ottoman rulers – the sultanas.
Narrativity and Literariness in the Ottoman Chronicle of Naʿīmā
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In Making Sense of History: Narrativity and Literariness in the Ottoman Chronicle of Naʿīmā, Gül Şen offers the first comprehensive analysis of narrativity in the most prominent official Ottoman court chronicle. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines methods from history and literary studies, Şen focuses on the purpose and function of the chronicle—not just what the text says but why Naʿīmā wrote it and how he shaped the narrated reality on the textual level. As a case study on the literalization of historical material, Making Sense of History provides insights into the historiographical and literary conventions underpinning Naʿīmā’s chronicle and contributes to our understanding of elite mentalities in the early modern Ottoman world by highlighting the author’s use of key concepts such as history and time.
A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)
'The House of the Priest’ presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury’s memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement.

Contributors: Sarah Irving, Charbel Nassif, Konstantinos Papastathis, Karène Sanchez Summerer, Cyrus Schayegh
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In Unravelling the Social Formation: Free Trade, the State and Business Associations in Turkey, Akif Avci examines the role of business associations and the state in Turkey in analysing the dialectical relationship between global free trade and Turkish social formation since 2002. The manuscript constructs a three-levels analysis based on the social relations of production, forms of state and world order. It explores the class characteristics of the business associations, the role of the Turkish state in the process of integration into global capitalism, and at the same time, internalisation of the global class relations inside Turkish social formation. It offers a fresh evaluation of imperialism theories and the uneven and combined development (U&CD) approach from a neo-Gramscian perspective.
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On 9 July 1860 CE, an outbreak of violence in the inner-city Christian quarter of Damascus created shock waves locally and internationally. This book provides a step-by-step presentation of events and issues to assess the true role of all the players and shapers of events. It critically examines the internal and external politico-socio-economic factors involved and argues that economic interests rather than religious fanaticism were the main causes for the riot of 1860. Furthermore, it argues that the riot was not a sudden eruption but rather a planned and organised affair.
Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī’s (d. 1101/1690) Theology of Sufism
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In Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism, Naser Dumairieh argues that, as a result of changing global conditions facilitating the movement of scholars and texts, the seventeenth-century Ḥijāz was one of the most important intellectual centers of the Islamic world, acting as a hub between its different parts.
Positioning Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī (d. 1101/1690) as representative of the intellectual activities of the pre-Wahhabism Ḥijāz, Dumairieh argues that his coherent philosophical system represents a synthesis of several major post-classical traditions of Islamic thought, namely kalām and Akbarian appropriations of Avicennian metaphysics. Al-Kūrānī’s work is the culmination of the philosophized Akbarian tradition; with his reconciliation of Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas with Ashʿarī theology, Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas became Islamic theology.
A Critical Edition of Saʿdeddīn Efendi’s (d. 1599) Selimname
Saʿdeddīn Efendi was a renowned Ottoman chief jurisconsult, influential statesman, eminent scholar, and prolific translator of Arabic and Persian works into Turkish. Prognostic Dreams, Otherworldly Saints, and Caliphal Ghosts comprises a critical edition, English translation, and a facsimile of his hagiographic work on controversial Ottoman sultan Selim I (“the Grim”). Saʿdeddīn’s Selimname consists of a preface and twelve anecdotes in which Selim I is portrayed as a divinely ordained sultan who delves into the realm of meditation, communicates with otherworldly saints and the “rightly guided” caliphs, and foretells the future.