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Editors: and
The European Values Studies book series is based on the results of a large-scale, cross-national, and longitudinal survey research program, founded in the late 1970s by a foundation which is now called the European Values Study. This group investigates basic social, cultural, political, moral, and religious values held by the populations of the European countries. The first study was carried out in 1981, followed by repeat surveys in 1990, 1999, and 2008, in an increasing number of countries. Today, all European countries are involved in the European Values Study. The publications in this series include interpretations and explanations of the quantitative survey data. These are presented in the form of monographs and edited volumes. The Series also publishes sourcebooks.

The series has published one volume over the last 5 years.
What explains the rise of populist nationalism in the contemporary phase of globalized development? Drawing on Karl Polanyi’s study of the great transformation, The Rise of the Capitalist State and Neo-nationalism argues that populist nationalism is a societal reaction to the pro-market structural changes in the political economies of nation-states – conceptualized as the capital-state transformation. Oleksandr Svitych shows that there is an inextricable link between free market reforms, declining state legitimacy, and identity-based mobilization. Examining four case studies (Australia, France, Hungary, and South Korea) through a mixed method approach, the book finds that discontented voters gravitate toward populist neo-national political forces and embrace identity-based solutions – often in exclusivist and scapegoating forms – to harness their anxieties and insecurities triggered by the capital-state restructuring. Populist nationalism of both the left and the right has emerged to compensate for the real and perceived inability of the state to shield citizens from the corrosive effects of market fundamentalism. The Rise of the Capitalist State and Neo-nationalism contributes to our understanding of the dynamics of the interrelated nature of state, capital, and identity politicization through a broader social theoretical perspective.
Volume Editors: and
Much ink has been spilled on poverty measurements and trends, at the expense of revealing causality. Assembling multi-disciplinary and international contributions, this book shows that a causal understanding of poverty in rich and poor countries is essential. That understanding must be based on a critical interrogation of the wider social relations which set up the mechanisms producing poverty as an outcome. Processes that widen/strengthen crisis-ridden market relations, that increase income/wealth inequality, and that ‘enhance’ the policy-biases of nation-states and international institutions toward the affluent-propertied strata cause global poverty and undermine poor people’s political power. The processes concentrating wealth-creation are poverty-causing processes. Through theoretical and empirical analyses this volume offers important insights and political prescriptions to address global poverty.

Contributors are:Raju J. Das, Deepak K. Mishra, Steven Pressman, Michael Roberts, Jamie Gough, Aram Eisenschitz, Anjan Chakravarty, Mizhar Mikati, Marcelo Milan, Tarique Niazi, John Marangos, Eirini Triarchi, Themis Anthrakidis, Macayla Kisten and Brij Maharaj, David Michael M. San Juan, and Thaddeus Hwong.
Comparative Studies in Governance
This series makes available scholarship that helps us to understand the changing balances between centres of power and the territories under their domination. It takes as a starting point the notion that domination is frequently achieved through conquest and coercion, but is rarely maintained exclusively by such means. The empires as well as the composite states of the pre-modern world always depended to some extent on the integration and cooperation of regional elites. The relationship between rulers and elites took shape in the centre as well as in the regions. At the heart of the dynastic state, rulers found themselves surrounded by a variety of state servants, ranging from personal attendants to advisers, priests, administrators and soldiers. How were such staffs recruited, and how did rulers attempt to secure their lasting loyalty? In addition to the social and institutional intricacies of the ruler’s environment, we invite studies about the architectural and cultural make-up, comparing the layout of palaces, rules for access, and the ritual, artistic, as well as scholarly forms underpinning dynastic legitimacy. Going from the centre to the regions, how did armies, administrators, church and religion, law and justice operate? Were such institutions and practices strongly centralized and filled with rulers’ nominees, or closer to regional elites in personnel and mentality? Was the culture of regional elites oriented strongly towards the standards of the centre? Which forms of contact and representation evolved? To what extent, finally, did the population participate in the practices and rituals of rulership?
These themes and questions offer a framework for comparison which this series will pursue, ideally by publishing work that is in itself comparative, but also by publishing studies focusing on a single region while fitting into the general framework. An initial focus on the early modern Eurasian world leaves open extensions in time and space relevant for the theme.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/ or full manuscripts to either the series editor, Jeroen Duindam, or the publisher, Arjan van Dijk at Brill, P.O. Box 9000, 2300 PA Leiden, The Netherlands.
The Functioning of Capitalism in History
Despite their many disagreements when it comes to the subject of capitalism, Marxist and market-liberal approaches seem to agree about one thing: the economic structures of capitalist market society have made direct violence against the person not only superfluous, but economically counterproductive. Heide Gerstenberger's Market and Violence does not contest the thesis that there has been, in many places, a decline in the use of violence in the pursuit of profit; but it demolishes the assumption that this can be put down to the evolution of economic rationality. By means of a deep engagement with the concrete historical reality of capitalist economies, Gerstenberger establishes that, wherever capitalism has been tamed, this has been achieved only by a combination of energetic social contestation and political intervention. First published in German in 2018, the present English-language edition makes a sweeping history of capitalist violence by one of the preeminent theorists of capitalist society working today available to a wider readership.
Transversal Solidarities and Politics of Possibility
Contending Global Apartheid: Transversal Solidarities and Politics of Possibility spells out a plea for utopia in a crisis-ridden 21st century of unequal development, exclusionary citizenship, and forced migrations. The volume offers a collection of critical essays on human rights movements, sanctuary spaces, and the emplacement of antiracist conviviality in cities across North and South America, Europe, and Africa. They proceed from the idea that cities may accommodate both a humanistic sensibility and a radical potential for social transformation. The figure of the ‘migrant’ is pivotal. It expounds the prospect of transversal solidarity to capture a plurality of commonalities and to abjure dichotomies between in-group and out-group, the national and the international, or society and institutions.

Contributors are: Aleksandra Ålund, Ilker Ataç, Martin Bak Jørgensen, Harald Bauder, Iriann Freemantle, Christophe Foultier, Óscar García Agustín, Shannon Gleeson, Margaret Godoy, Els de Graauw, Ilhan Kellecioglu, Loren B. Landau, Jorge Morales Cardiel, Janet Munakamwe, Kim Rygiel, Ana Santamarina, Carl-Ulrik Schierup, Sarah Schilliger, and Maurice Stierl.
The definition of a healthcare system evolves continuously, becoming broader and more complex with each rendering. Healthcare systems can consist of many different elements, including but not limited to: access to comprehensive medical care, health promotion, disease prevention, institutional framework, financing schemes, government responsibility over health, etc. In light of its broad classification of healthcare, this book focuses on a wide spectrum of health-related issues ranging from risk factors for disease to medical treatment and possible frameworks for healthcare systems. Aging populations, increasing costs of healthcare, advancing technology, and challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic require an innovative conceptual and methodological framework. By combining the experience and effort of researchers from a variety of fields including mathematics, medicine and economics, this book offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying health-related issues. It contributes to the existing literature by integrating the perspective of treatment with the economic determinants of health care outcomes, such as population density, access to financial resources and institutional frameworks. It also provides new evidence regarding the pharmaceutical industry including innovation, international trade and company performance.

Contributors are: Sayansk Da Silva, Joe Feinglass, Scott W. Hegerty, Joseph E. Hibdon, Jr, Arkadiusz Michał Kowalski, Małgorzata Stefania Lewandowska, Dawid Majcherek, Ewelina Nojszewska, Izabela Pruchnicka-Grabias, Agata Sielska and Julian Smółka.
Volume Editors: and
Sociology for Durkheim was by no means a knowledge closed in its specificity. It was rather an open science, permeable to contributions coming from other disciplines. For him, the task of sociology was to study what held societies together, giving place to reflective change and progressive development. This is an epistemological and political model that still retains all its relevance today: an example to be rediscovered against any reductionist conception of the vocation and object of social sciences; an encouragement to see sociology as an indispensable protagonist for an authentic interdisciplinary dialogue in the field of humanities. It is one of the best legacies Durkheim left us, that this book attempts to illustrate.