Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 206 items for :

  • Ancient Philosophy x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Studies in Ancient Philosophy
Editor-in-Chief:
Philosophia Antiqua is the leading series specializing in books on Ancient Philosophy, covering the entire history of the subject from the Presocratics through Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics to the Neoplatonists of late Antiquity. The series has recently tended to emphasize areas that once used to be under-represented in the literature, for example Hellenistic philosophy, the skeptical tradition, Galen and other non-Platonist authors of later Antiquity, but this merely reflects a shifting focus in the field and is not a matter of deliberate policy. The over-riding concern of the series is to promote scholarship of the highest quality and originality, publishing work specifically oriented towards texts (editions, commentaries, translations), but also monographs, including both those that offer new readings of familiar – or less familiar – texts and those that explore the intersections between ancient and modern topics and approaches. Volumes are published in English, French and German. The series includes edited volumes that show a clear and coherent focus, but does not normally host Festschriften or Memorial volumes.
Volume Editors: and
This volume explores the influence of the Socratic legacy in the Russian, East European, and Soviet contexts. For writers, philosophers, and artists, Socrates has served as a potent symbol—of the human capacity for philosophical reflection, as well as the tumultuous (and often dangerous) reality in which Russian-speaking and Soviet intellectuals found themselves. The thirteen chapters include surveys of historical periods and movements (the 18th century, Nietzscheanism, and the “Greek Renaissance” of Russian culture), studies of individual writers and philosophers (Skovoroda, Herzen, Dostoevsky, Rozanov, Bely, Narbut, and many others), and investigations of Socratic subtexts (e.g., in Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita and Nosov’s Neznaika series for children). The volume concludes with a “Socratic Texts” section of new translations. The plurality of these topics demonstrates the continued relevance of the Socratic myth not only for Russian-speaking culture, but for the world.
Die Reihe ist abgeschlossen.
Philosophy as a Way of Life (PWL) is both a meta-philosophy and a methodological approach to the study of philosophy, inspired by the work of the French scholar Pierre Hadot (1922-2010). As a methodology, PWL emphasizes that all ancient philosophical works reflect pedagogical and psychagogic concerns, and argues that these features should continue to be taken into account in contemporary philosophy. It is based largely on the practice of “spiritual exercises”, intended to transform the practitioner’s way of perceiving the world, and hence her mode of being, in order to enable her to lead a freer, more happy existence. Thus, PWL views philosophy in its fullest sense as profoundly transformational.

Philosophy as a Way of Life: Texts and Studies will make available English translations of key studies on PWL and publish scholarly monographs and edited collections that consider its different aspects and implications.

Books in this series will explore PWL in antiquity, the renaissance, the early modern period, and up to the present, PWL as a methodological approach to the history of philosophy, the implications of PWL for understanding education and its history, the cross-cultural possibilities it opens up, the relationships between PWL, virtue ethics and philosophy of culture, and the different literary genres of PWL, including the way these genres impact the style and content of ancient, medieval and early modern philosophical works.
Volume Editors: and
This volume celebrates the scholarship of Professor Johan C. Thom by tackling various important topics relevant for the study of the New Testament, such as the intellectual environment of early Christianity, especially Greek, Latin, and early Jewish texts, New Testament apocrypha and other early Christian writings, as well as Greek grammar. The authors offer fresh insights on philosophical texts and traditions, the cultural repertoire of early Christian literature, critical editions, linguistics and interpretation, and comparative analyses of ancient writings.
Volume Editors: and
Sosipatra, Hypatia, Macrina: some of the most famous female philosophers of antiquity were connected to Neoplatonism. But what does it mean to be a woman philosopher in late antiquity? How is the inclusive nature of the Neoplatonic schools connected to their ethical, political, and metaphysical ideas? What role does the religious dimension of late Neoplatonism and the role of women as priestesses play in understanding Neoplatonic women philosophers?
This book offers thirteen essays that examine women and the female in Neoplatonism from a variety of perspectives, paying particular attention to the interactions between the metaphysics, psychology, and ethics.
Der Ausdruck „die goldene Mitte finden“ ist bekannt – aber wissen Sie auch, wer die Idee wesentlich geprägt hat? Kleiner Tipp: Es war der vielleicht wichtigste Philosoph der Antike. Aristoteles schuf mit seinen Ausführungen zur Angemessenheit gewissermaßen eine Leitlinie für’s Glücklichsein. Er plädierte dafür, sich stets zwischen einem „zu viel“ und einem „zu wenig“ zu bewegen. Sein Leitfaden zu einem glücklichen Leben war jedoch nur ein Aspekt eines schier unerschöpflichen philosophischen Werkes. Darüber hinaus verfasste Aristoteles eine Fülle an Schriften zur Logik, Metaphysik, politischen Philosophie und nicht zuletzt zur Zoologie. Der neue Comic aus der Reihe „Philosophische Einstiege“ macht den griechischen Philosophen auch für Anfänger:innen sehr gut verständlich und besticht dabei mit zahlreichen Illustrationen, die für Anschaulichkeit und Spaß am eigenen Philosophieren sorgen. So gelingt eine unkomplizierte Einführung in die wichtigsten Aristotelischen Werke und Gedanken.
Rawls and Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas
John Rawls is the most influential 20th century political philosopher, but critics have complained about the ahistorical character of his approach. The purpose of this book is to argue that these critics are, at best, only half correct.Pre-Liberal Political Philosophy concentrates on four pre-liberal thinkers who are major figures in the history of philosophy and who are surprisingly formative in the development of Rawls’s mature political philosophy: Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas.
Several illuminating connections are drawn between Rawls’s political liberalism and Plato’s contrasting appeal to the “noble lie” in politics, between Rawls’s overall method of reflective equilibrium and Aristotle’s dialectic, between Rawls’s opposition to merit in the distribution of wealth and Augustine’s similar anti-Pelagian stance, and between Rawls’s view of a just society as a common good of common goods and the natural law dimension of Aquinas’s philosophy. In general, the distance between Rawlsian abstraction and his historical embeddedness is lessened considerably.
Platons Antwort an Protagoras im ‘Theaitetos’ und im ‘Protagoras’
Protagoras beansprucht, die Jugend erziehen zu können. Warum nicht? Wenn «Mensch Maß aller Dinge» ist, kann jeder jeden ‘besser’ machen… Für Plato geht das nicht auf. Insofern Pädagogik Menschen dazu bringen will, ‘bessere’ Wesen zu werden, verlangt sie nach Plato ein gesundes Verständnis von ‘Sein’ überhaupt. Diese Studie untersucht die ontologischen Implikationen des Homo mensura-Satzes, Protagoras’ Prämisse, im ‘Theaitetos’ – einem Dialog, der selten ontologisch gelesen wird. Wenn der protagoräische Prämisse den pädagogischen Anspruch nicht trägt, dürfte der ‘Protagoras’ gar nicht eigentlich von den erzieherischen Fragen handeln, die diskutiert werden. Es könnte sich herausstellen, dass er einen ‘verborgenen’ Diskurs enthält…

Protagoras claims to be able to educate the young. If «Man is Measure of Everything», anybody can make everybody ‘better’… To Plato, this doesn't add up. Insofar as pedagogy aims at making humans become better beings, to Plato it supposes a sound conception of ‘being’ per se. This study explores the ontological implications of homo mensura, Protagoras’ premiss, in the ‘Theaetetus’ – a dialogue which is rarely read ontologically. If the Protagorean premiss doesn't support the pedagogical claim, the ‘Protagoras’ might not even be about the educational questions under discussion, but turn out to contain a ‘hidden’ discourse…