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Band III: Lyrik zwischen 1800 und 2010
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Was ist eigentlich moderne Lyrik? Wie und wo entsteht sie? Wie entfaltet sie sich weltweit zwischen ca. 1800 und heute? Wie verhält sie sich zu den traditionellen Lyriken, und inwiefern bilden funktional traditionell gestaltete und moderne Lyriken gemeinsam die ‚Weltsprache‘ der globalen Gegenwartslyrik? Solche und weitere Fragen untersucht der dritte Teil der Globalgeschichte der Lyrik. Indem er die Geschichten der Lyriken aller Kontinente, Sprachen und Schriften zu einer Globalgeschichte der Lyrik zusammenführt, erklärt der Band, wieso das Schreiben und Lesen von Lyrik heute eine weltweite, anthropologisch universale Kulturpraktik ist, mit der grundlegende poetische Dispositionen des Menschen erfüllt werden.
Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Published on behalf of the Association for the Study of the New Literatures in English (ASNEL/GNEL).

ASNEL Papers is a subseries of Cross/Cultures.
formerly Studies in Arabic Literature
This series aims to publish literary critical and historical studies on a broad range of literary materials: classical, modern and contemporary, written and oral, poetry and prose. It will also publish scholarly translations of major literary works. Studies that seek to integrate Middle Eastern literatures into the broader discourses of the humanities and the social sciences will take their place alongside works of a more technical and specialized nature. The series is open to monographs and edited volumes.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
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If you are working on a book that would be suitable for this series, please do not hesitate to get in touch with Acquisitions Editor Teddi Dols (Teddi.Dols@brill.com).
This series looks at the different literary traditions of the United States, including African American literature, Native American literature, Chicano and US latino literature, Asian American literature, as well as emergent literatures such as Indian or Arab American.
Although the series' focus is mostly comparative, multiethnic, and intercultural, it also welcomes feature analyses of single literary traditions.
Issues of race, ethnicity, class gender, and the interspace between the political and the aesthetic, among other possible topics, figure prominently in the series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Journal for African Culture and Society
Matatu is published as journal as of 2016. All back volumes are still available in print. Follow the link to the journal for current submissions and publications.

Matatu was a series on African literatures and societies dedicated to interdisciplinary dialogue between literary and cultural studies, historiography, the social sciences and cultural anthropology. As a series it has been discontinued, and has been continued as a dynamic journal.
Matatu is animated by a lively interest in African culture and literature (including the Afro-Caribbean) that moves beyond worn-out clichés of “cultural authenticity” and “national liberation” towards critical exploration of African modernities. The East African public transport vehicle from which Matatu takes its name is both a component and a symbol of these modernities: based on “Western” (these days usually Japanese) technology, it is a vigorously African institution; it is usually regarded with some anxiety by those travelling in it, but is often enough the only means of transport available; it creates temporary communicative communities and provides a transient site for the exchange of news, storytelling, and political debate.
Matatu is firmly committed to supporting democratic change in Africa, to providing a forum for interchanges between African and European critical debates, to overcoming notions of absolute cultural, ethnic, or religious alterity, and to promoting transnational discussion on the future of African societies in a wider world.
The Neo-Victorian Series aims to analyse the complex revival, re-vision and recycling of the long nineteenth century in the cultural imaginary. This contemporary phenomenon will be examined in its diverse British and worldwide, postcolonial and neo-colonial contexts, as well as its manifold forms, including literature, the arts, film, television, and virtual media. To assess such simultaneous artistic regeneration and retrogressive innovation and to tackle the ethical debate and ideological consequences of these re-appropriations will constitute the main challenges of this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.