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This groundbreaking collection of essays tells the surprising story of how the American Western has shaped world literature, fueling provocative novels and reflections about national identity, settler colonialism, and violence. Containing nineteen chapters spanning Asia, Africa, the Americas, Australia, Europe, Israel, and New Zealand, as well as a guiding, critical introduction, this book opens an exciting new chapter in the study of popular culture, literature, and globalization. Through this international lens, the literary Western casts off the categories of juvenilia and formula to come into focus as a vital and creative statement about identity, power, and history.

Contributors are: Zbigniew Białas, Manuela Borzone, Flavia Brizio-Skov, Alex Calder, Neil Campbell, Christopher Conway, Samir Dayal, Joel Deshaye, Johannes Fehrle, MaryEllen Higgins, Emily Hind, Shelly Jarenski, Rachel Leket-Mor, Warren Motte, Andrew Nette, Marek Paryż, David Rio, Steffen Wöll, and Sergei Zhuk
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The relationship between Conrad’s Malay fiction and colonialism is a prominent subject of commentary now, and has been for some time. Most scholars would point to Chinua Achebe’s important article “An Image of Africa” as the initiation into the interest in Conrad and colonialism, but if fact decades previously, Florence Clemens had begun this conversation in her ground-breaking commentary on Conrad’s Malay fiction. At the time Florence Clemens was writing, almost nothing had been written on the Conrad’s colonial world, and for many years her work thus was relatively unknown and relatively difficult to obtain. However, Clemens’ work is significant, and its appearance in Brill’s Conrad Studies series now makes this important study readily available to scholars.
The electronic version of the Cross/Cultures series.

Cross/Cultures covers the whole range of the colonial and post-colonial experience across the English-speaking world as well as the literatures and cultures of non-anglophone countries. The series accommodates both studies by single authors and edited critical collections.

The broad spectrum of Cross/Cultures can be illustrated by book topics as diverse as black South African autobiography, Kenyan settler writing, the African-Jamaican aesthetic, Australian and New Zealand poetry, Southeast Asian art after 1990, diasporic trauma in Caribbean writing and women’s fiction of the Sri Lankan diaspora. Cross/Cultures has also published monograph treatments of such writers as Chinua Achebe, J.M. Coetzee, Kate Grenville, Caryl Phillips, Raja Rao, Derek Walcott, and Patrick White.

Included in Cross/Cultures are collections of selected and revised papers from important conferences (ASNEL Papers = GAPS; ACLALS; EACLALS).
Postcolonial Literatures of Climate Change investigates the evolving nature of postcolonial literary criticism in response to global, regional, and local environmental transformations brought about by climate change. It builds upon, and extends, previous studies in postcolonial ecocriticism to demonstrate how the growing awareness of human-caused global warming has begun to permeate literary consciousness, praxis and analysis. The breadth of the volume’s coverage – the diversity of its focal locations, cultures, genres and texts – serves as a salient reminder that, while climate change is global, its impacts vary, effecting peoples from place to place unequally, and often in accordance with their particular historical experience of colonialism and neo-colonialism, as well as their ongoing marginalisations.

“Demonstrating the urgency of invoking novel epistemological approaches combining the scientific and the imaginative, this book is a “must read” for those concerned about the present and potential impacts of climate change on formerly colonised areas of the world. The comprehensive and illuminating Introduction offers a crucial history and current state of postcolonial ecocriticism as it has been and is addressing climate crises.”
- Helen Tiffin, University of Wollongong

“The broad focus on the polar regions, the Pacific and the Caribbean – with added essays on environmental justice/activism in India and Egypt – opens up rich terrain for examination under the rubric of postcolonial and ecocritical analysis, not only expanding recent studies in this field but also enabling new comparisons and conceptual linkages.” - Helen Gilbert, Royal Holloway, University of London

“The subject is topical and vital and will become even more so as the problem of how to reconcile the demands of climate change with the effects on regions and individual nations already damaged by the economic effects of colonisation and the subsequent inequalities resulting from neo-colonialism continues to grow.” - Gareth Griffiths, Em. Prof. University of Western Australia

A Postcolonial Re-envisioning
The Yeats -Tagore friendship and the eventual curious fallout between the two remain a mystery; the focus of this volume is a postcolonial reading of the two writers’ friendship, the critical reception of Tagore in 1912 England, and Tagore’s erasure from Western literary discourse. The essays in this volume take a decolonial turn to critically analyze the two writers in the discourse of power that is a part of their larger story.

The nuances that appear in the pages of this illuminating book explore the meaning of "the politics of friendship" and the sense of intercultural relationship marred by colonialism. The volume re-envisions what the "postcolonial" can mean, be, and do. We can learn from the two major figures and their work and create a new vision of that problematic preposition "post.<
- Professor Mieke Bal, ASCA (Amsterdam School of Cultural Analysis).

This volume offers a magnificent illustration of how to retell the story of a cross-cultural literary relationship from a decolonial perspective. Ghosh and Redwine’s edited collection exemplifies the need of the hour: to reassess the value of literary traditions, institutions, and relationships while illuminating the politics of colonialism and racism that compromises them.
- Deepika Bahri, Professor of English, Emory University; Author of Postcolonial Biology.
In this groundbreaking book, Andrey Makarychev approaches populism through a critical biopolitical lens and shows that populist narratives are grounded intrinsically in corporeality, sexuality, health, bodily life and religious practices. The author demonstrates that populism is a phenomenon deeply rooted in mass culture. He compares three countries -- Estonia, Ukraine and Russia--that all share post-Soviet experiences offering a broad spectrum of populist discourses. The three case studies display the interconnection between biopower and populism through references to culture, media, art, theatrical performances and literature, raising new questions and directions for understanding traditional accounts of populism.
Poverty and precarity are among the most pressing social issues of today and have become a significant thematic focus and analytical tool in the humanities in the last two decades. This volume brings together an international group of scholars who investigate conceptualisations of poverty and precarity from the perspective of literary and cultural studies as well as linguistics. Analysing literature, visual arts and news media from across the postcolonial world, they aim at exploring the frameworks of representation that impact affective and ethical responses to disenfranchised groups and precarious subjects. Case studies focus on intersections between precarity and race, class, and gender, institutional frameworks of publishing, environmental precarity, and the framing of refugees and migrants as precarious subjects.

Contributors: Clelia Clini, Geoffrey V. Davis, Dorothee Klein, Sue Kossew, Maryam Mirza, Anna Lienen, Julia Hoydis, Susan Nalugwa Kiguli, Sule Emmanuel Egya, Malcolm Sen, Jan Rupp, J.U. Jacobs, Julian Wacker, Andreas Musolff, Janet M. Wilson
Black Neo-Victoriana is the first book-length study on contemporary re-imaginations of Blackness in the long nineteenth century. Located at the intersections of postcolonial studies, Black studies, and neo-Victorian criticism, this interdisciplinary collection engages with the global trend to reimagine and rewrite Black Victorian subjectivities that have been continually marginalised in both historical and cultural discourses. Contributions cover a range of media, from novels and drama to film, television and material culture, and draw upon cultural formations such as Black fandom, Black dandyism, or steamfunk. The book evidences how neo-Victorian studies benefits from reading re-imaginations of the long nineteenth century vis-à-vis Black epistemologies, which unhinge neo-Victorianism’s dominant spatial and temporal axes and reroute them to conceive of the (neo-)Victorian through Blackness.